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4/23/2017 2:11:10 PM
Topic:
Tale of Genji Movie Lady Murasaki-Very Long Hair

thp2057
thp2057
Posts: 17
In preparation for Professor Miyake’s lecture on Literature from Japan’s Classical and Warrior Age, I watched a film from YouTube to have a better background to Murasaki Shikibu’s “The Tale of Genji”. The film is 2 hours and 16 minutes, “Tale of Genji Movie Lady Murasaki-Very Long Hair Lady from Japan” that can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXwSIE2cm88.
The film is about the 11th century love story centers on the life of Prince Genji through the eyes of his lovers and court artisans. Though I had doubts early on, the story is so interesting that I could not pause to see what happens next. Watching the film allowed me to have a better understanding of Japan’s aristocracy intrigues and rivalries of court life, and the importance of poetry literacy.
For secondary students, I would play certain clips along with the institute provided readings into the Japan unit. For instance, students will examine the scenes of the emperor’s court, the artisans, and the importance of poetry during this age.
4/22/2017 3:18:02 PM
Topic:
Confucius

jshen
jshen
Posts: 14
Yes, I agree with you that this could be a good movie to show the students about the life of Confucius. But I also can understand your concern of the students' attention span. This movie demands a lot of thinking and focus skills.
4/22/2017 1:22:05 PM
Topic:
Film Review - To Live

jshen
jshen
Posts: 14
As a Mandarin Teacher, I had watched this movie several times with my students, and in every post movie discussion, besides the different culture background, almost all the students could resonate the main theme of the movie and agreed that this is a very touching movie.
" To Live" is a simple title, but it conceals a universe. In Chinese, "活着“means more close to " To be living". The impression part of this movie is unlike other historical documentary movies, it reveals the historical events in China since 1940s by the end of the last dynasty-Qing, to the 8 years of China-Japan war, then the 10 years of Chinese Civil War, followed later on the 10 years of the Cultural Revolution. The movie shows how these big events affected a regular family, their fierce struggles with fate. their hope is basically summed up by the wife who loses wealth and position and children and who says," all I ask is a quiet life together."
Most of my students resonate that life is hard, yet it has to be going on, we are still struggling " To Live".
4/10/2017 7:30:16 PM
Topic:
focus on the qin and han dynasties

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
https://www.wsj.com/articles/age-of-empires-chinese-art-of-the-qin-and-han-dynasties-221-b-c-a-d-220-review-treasures-of-nation-building-1491735606

The Wall Street Journal article above discusses a new exhibition at NY's Metropolitan Museum of Art: Age of Empires. The exhibition runs through July 16. The article notes that this is the second such exhibition bringing to America some of the archeological discoveries of the past 50 years. The exhibition draws on more than 30 museums and institutions. And a third exhibition is scheduled for the China Institute later this year.

Museum website: http://www.metmuseum.org/press/exhibitions/2016/age-of-empires

Our generous supporter, the Freeman Foundation, underwrote the education programs the Met is planning.
edited by Clay Dube on 4/10/2017
4/7/2017 2:39:27 PM
Topic:
Immersive Int'l Studies Summer Institute at UCLA

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 149
UCLA is pleased to announce a new 1-week intensive summer program for high school students using "Defining a Nation: India on the Eve of Independence, 1945" from the Reacting to the Past series of immersive role-playing games. Students will be able to earn 2 college credits while learning about India at the end of British colonial rule. Students will take on roles as actual or fictional people living in India in 1945, and debate how to shape a postcolonial India.

More information is available at: http://summer.ucla.edu/institutes/ImmersiveInternationalStudies

This video shows the student perspective of the India game, as played with Barnard and Columbia students: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3uCVqqIuM4&feature=youtu.be

Please contact Jennifer Jung-Kim at jungkim@ucla.edu if you have questions.
edited by cgao on 4/7/2017
4/4/2017 9:59:13 AM
Topic:
Free books for classrooms

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 149
In the pursuit of making the Chinese Language teaching materials available in North America, the Hanban / Confucius Institute Headquarters is offering donation of Chinese Language Teaching Materials to benefit students under your jurisdiction, as well as to those schools / school districts that have a Chinese Language Program in place and to those that are interested in launching one in the near future.


At the moment, there are only 30 parcels (500 books in each parcel) of materials left. We encourage you to further share the books with your local schools / school districts that have a Chinese Language Program. Each parcel includes: textbooks, multi-media DVDs, CDs and a host of reading materials, which adds up to a generous grant of USD 5,000 for each recipient. Over the years, a total of more than 1,700 US schools had adopted our teaching materials.


Please take advantage of this offer. If any of you are interested, simply apply online at: http://hanban.ca/donation. Donation is on first-come-first-served basis.


For more information, please contact info@hanban.ca or (604) 662-8498.
edited by cgao on 4/4/2017
3/30/2017 10:46:12 AM
Topic:
Film Review - "The Gate of Heavenly Peace"

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Outstanding recommendations. I like Nikki's suggestion of pairing this discussion with Animal Farm (see Chinese editions: https://twitter.com/claydube/status/824333295005511680 ). There is an educational version that schools/districts may wish to purchase:

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Gate-Heavenly-Peace-Tiananmen-Square/dp/1463103743

Center for Asian American Media http://caamedia.org/films/gate-of-heavenly-peace/

The main website for the documentary is at: http://www.tsquare.tv/ It includes a lot of useful resources for teachers.

Two other films about the Tiananmen demonstrations are: part 3 "Born under the Red Flag" of the China: A Century of Revolution Series
https://zeitgeistfilms.com/film/chinaacenturyofrevolution

And our film on media coverage of the demonstrations: http://china.usc.edu/assignment-china-tiananmen-square
also at our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ho8vAFlCeFQ&index=8&list=PLZoSvm2n7tkcHkxfcRuu0B5N0QSnBfzSd

Finally, you may find this talk about suppression of the history of Tiananmen of use: http://china.usc.edu/video-tiananmen-revisited-louisa-lim

A collection of resources: http://china.usc.edu/tags/tiananmen
3/27/2017 10:35:32 AM
Topic:
U.S.-China Relations through the Scope of History

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 149
U.S.-China Relations through the Scope of History

Date: Wednesday, April 26th
Time: 4:30 PM-7:30 PM
Location: Pacific Science Center

4:30-5:00 Introduction and curricular connections
5:00-6:00 Explore the Terracotta Warriors Exhibit
6:00-7:30 Program with John Pomfret

Registration fee: $30

Explore the one-of-a-kind Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor exhibit and then join us for a conversation with John Pomfret, former Washington post bureau chief in Beijing, and the author of The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom. Mr. Pomfret will discuss U.S.-China relations in a new administration, thinking about the ways that history informs current politics.

The first 30 registrants will receive a free copy of John Pomfret’s book, The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: America and China, 1776 to the Present.

Our Featured Speaker:

Raised in New York City and educated at Stanford and Nanjing universities, John Pomfret is an award-winning journalist with The Washington Post. He has been a foreign correspondent for 15 years, covering big wars and small in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Congo, Sri Lanka, Iraq, southwestern Turkey and northeastern Iran. Pomfret has spent seven years covering China – one in the late 1980s during the Tiananmen Square protests and then from 1998 until the end of 2003 as the bureau chief for The Washington Post in Beijing. In 2003, Pomfret was awarded the Osborne Elliot Award for the best coverage of Asia by the Asia Society.

He is the author of the acclaimed book, Chinese Lessons, and has won several awards for his coverage of Asia, including the Osborne Elliot Prize. He holds a BA and MA from Stanford University and attended Singapore’s Institute of Southeast Asian Studies as a Fulbright Scholar. Pomfret speaks, reads and writes Mandarin, having spent two years at Nanjing University in the early 1980s as part of one of the first groups of American students to study in China.

Registration fee:

$30, includes resource packet, entrance to exhibit, light dinner, and three OSPI clock hours

You can find more details on the World Affairs Council website.

Register Now
3/23/2017 3:01:28 PM
Topic:
Neighborhoods in Japan, July 10 - 14, 2017

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 149
Neighborhoods in Japan:

Learning and Teaching about Community through Stories, Videos, and Images

An NCTA seminar for teachers of grades 2-8

July 10 - 14, 2017
8:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. (Mon-Fri)
At the University of Washington in Seattle

Apply by March 31st

Seminar leader: Patricia Burleson with guest segments led by Professor Robert Pekannen and longtime EARC collaborator Oralee Kramer

Neighborhoods in Japan will use stories, videos, and images to build an understanding of community life in Japan today. The seminar’s guiding question will be “How can we introduce our students to diverse stories of life in Japan?” In addition to exploring a rich variety of resources, the week will focus on adapting content and materials for use in your grade 2-8 classroom. We'll use books such as I Live in Tokyo, The Wakame Gatherers, and the 2016 verse novel Up from the Sea, among others.

University of Washington Professor Robert Pekannen will join us to discuss his latest research on how strong neighborhood associations contribute to quality of life and effective governance in Japan.

Seminar goals:
• Learn about multiple characteristics and ways of life in a variety of Japanese neighborhoods.
• Encourage students to explore ways of living in neighborhoods in another country.
• Compare and contrast neighborhoods in Japan with your local neighborhoods through features such as police and fire departments, places of worship, and shops.
• Consider how neighborhoods contribute to a sense of identity and belonging.
• Discover common and unique neighborhood festivals.
• Study maps for hints about neighborhood characteristics and history.
Teachers will leave the seminar with:
• Reliable resources, including several books, and knowledge to support their teaching of Japanese culture in their curriculum
• Creative ideas, lessons, and activities ready to use in their classrooms
• An interest in learning more about life in Japan
• A framework for exploring neighborhoods in other countries

Please refer to the application for additional details and eligibility requirements.
3/22/2017 3:19:47 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Many of you are already reading Education about Asia, but for those who aren't, this is a great opportunity to acquaint yourself with this tremendous resource. Be sure to sign up for email updates from the magazine. The links below are to articles from back issues of the magazine.

A review of one of my favorite films, To Live (book by Yu Hua, film directed by Zhang Yimou), a review of the book (which differs from the film in significant ways), an interview with author Yu Hua

A review of the SPICE unit on the Cultural Revolution (which won an award from the Association for Asian Studies); an excerpt from the unit is available here; the unit is available for purchase here.

A lesson plan about the Cultural Revolution by Deborah Pellikan

A review of a book on posters from the Cultural Revolution

A review of the Tim Cheek book, Mao Zedong and China's Revolutions

An article by Yihong Pan on "From Red Guards to Thinking Individuals: China's Youth in the Cultural Revolution"

A look at pre-collegiate US textbook treatments of Mao's rule by Philip Williams
edited by Clay Dube on 3/22/2017
3/22/2017 3:08:27 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Stan Rosen will be speaking at the workshop about film during the Cultural Revolution and films about the Cultural Revolution.

Here are three articles about the topic:

Jin Feng, "Teaching China’s Cultural Revolution through Film: Blue Kite as a Case Study," Asian Network Exchange

May 15, 2016, Straits Times - "50 years on, Cultural Revolution still off limits in films, books in China"

Positions (academic journal) - "Disappearance of Animals in Animated Films of the Cultural Revolution"
edited by Clay Dube on 3/22/2017
3/22/2017 3:07:03 PM
Topic:
East Asian Philosophies and Religions

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 149
East Asian Philosophies and Religions:A Visual and Literary Introduction

An NCTA seminar for teachers of all grade levels

July 24 - 28, 2017
8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. (Mon-Thurs)
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m (Fri)

Apply by March 31st

Seminar leader: Melanie King, Art History faculty at Seattle Central College

East Asian Philosophies and Religions: A Visual and Literary Introduction will explore the key philosophical and religious traditions that underlie East Asian belief systems, historically as well as in the present.

Our course of study will focus on the emergence of Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto within their original contexts, but will also consider how these traditions evolved as they moved across space and time. We will examine art and literature to familiarize ourselves with each tradition’s associated doctrines, objects and places of worship, and practices. As we analyze these sources, we will pay special attention to the impacts of cultural transmission, both on the traditions themselves and East Asian cultures they influenced.

By examining artworks and reading primary and secondary documents, we will also identify resources for inclusion in the classroom. No prior knowledge of the subject matter is required.


Topics covered will include:

Confucius and The Analects
Laozi and Daoism
Legalism and Qinshihuangdi’s Army
Emergence of Buddhism
Buddhism along the Silk Road
Transmission of Buddhism into Korea
Shinto
Chan (Zen) Buddhist traditions
20th Century East Asian Art

Please refer to the application for additional details and eligibility requirements.
edited by cgao on 3/22/2017
3/21/2017 1:56:41 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Geremie Barmé's Shades of Mao includes examples of Maospeak, that strange language that was rapidly adopted and then dropped in China. The examples are from novelist Wang Shuo 王朔 and are found at the highly recommended Morning Sun website: http://www.morningsun.org/red/wangshuo.html

The Morning Sun library offers many primary sources as well as analytical pieces: http://www.morningsun.org/library/index.html

Among the items there is an article from China Reconstructs, a state publication, on how "The Red Guards Battle Song" was born:
http://www.morningsun.org/smash/cr_3_1968.html

You can hear the song (and watch Mao driving through Red Guard masses at Tiananmen Square) at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyTIamfYve0
3/21/2017 1:08:04 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
This is another reading that problematizes our understanding of the Cultural Revolution. In it Barbara Mittler discusses how and why propaganda posters, songs, and films from the Cultural Revolution remain popular among many. She notes that isn't the case for Nazi propaganda.

She writes, "at least to German ears, propaganda is evil. It amounts to nothing but blatant lies and false pretense. Propaganda is manipulated and manipulative. Whenever propaganda has an effect, this is bound to be negative; an enthusiastic recipient of propaganda cannot but be deluded. A system creating propaganda is to be despised; everybody hopes for it to end. The times in which propaganda flourishes are considered unhappy times, times that everybody hopes will pass very quickly."

How, Mittler asks, is it that propaganda from a time when many Chinese suffered is still attractive to many Chinese?

Download the article at: https://www.amphilsoc.org/sites/default/files/proceedings/1520404.pdf

And consider this cultural revolution parody. A mug sitting on my desk calls for us "to serve renminbi" (RMB, the currency), a play on Mao's dictate that all should strive to serve the people.
3/21/2017 12:02:42 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Hi Folks,

Our workshop is Saturday, March 25. Have you signed up already? (details here) If you have, you've received access to special readings. Here I just want to share an issue of Peking Review (now published as Beijing Review). This is the August 16, 1968 issue. For the workshop, please read the article on pages 21-25, "Mao Tse-tung's Thought Directs Us in Battle: How we removed a 45 kg tumour." It includes,

"After more than a dozen hours of arduous work, the fighters boundlessly loyal to Chairman Mao's revolutionary line finally succeeded in wholly removing the 45-kg tumour from Chang Chiu'chu's body.

"After she regained consciousness, Chang Chiu-chu was extremely excited when she felt her abdomen. The very first words she uttered were: 'Long live Chairman Mao! Chairman Mao has saved me!' Mao Tse-tung's thought gave her boundless strength and vitality."

Read the attached story for details.

You may find other parts of this issue of the Peking Review of interest. See it at https://www.marxists.org/subject/china/peking-review/1968/PR1968-33.pdf The first pages are devoted to quotations from Mao, but also check out Mao's comments on and photos from the struggle of African Americans for justice.

Please comment on these materials. Peking Review issues from those days can't be found on the current Beijing Review website (http://bjreview.com). You can find them at: https://www.marxists.org/subject/china/peking-review/
edited by Clay Dube on 3/21/2017
3/13/2017 3:00:28 PM
Topic:
Graphic Novels and Cultural Authenticity

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 149
East Asian Literature in Your ClassroomGraphic Novels and Cultural Authenticity
Saturday, April 29, 2017
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
University of Washington in Seattle
Participants are invited to arrive as early as 8:30 am for coffee and conversation.

This one-day workshop will give teachers the opportunity to think deeply about “picture telling” in the art forms of the picture book, manga/graphic literature, and anime. Mary Roberts will demonstrate ways to evaluate materials for accurate content and cultural authenticity. Then, using provided texts such as Are You An Echo?: The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko, American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang, and Pyongyang: A Journey to North Korea by Guy Delisle, you'll have a chance to practice these skills and discuss the implications of "picture telling" with other participants. Mary will also highlight a variety of other quality classroom instructional materials for children and young adults that contribute meaningfully to an understanding of China, Japan, and Korea.

Qualifications
This workshop is open to all current K12 educators. No prior knowledge of East Asian literature or familiarity with manga and graphic novels is assumed.

Benefits
  • 6 Washington State OSPI clock hours
  • Free copies of the workshop texts and handouts
  • Lunch provided
  • One-year subscription to Education about Asia

  • Registration info

  • There is a $30 registration fee.
  • Registrations will be accepted on a rolling basis until the workshop reaches capacity (20 participants).
  • This workshop is open to all current K12 educators. No prior knowledge of East Asian literature is assumed.

  • Registration fee

    After submitting the registration form below, send your $30 check payable to "University of Washington" to:
    East Asia Resource Center
    UW Box 353650
    Seattle, WA 98195

    Sponsorship
    This NCTA workshop is sponsored by the East Asia Resource Center with funding from a Freeman Foundation grant in support of the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA).

    Register here.

    edited by cgao on 3/13/2017
    3/2/2017 2:00:31 PM
    Topic:
    Doors to the World: East Asia Summer Institute for Educators

    cgao
    cgao
    Administrator
    Posts: 149
    Doors to the World: East Asia Summer Institute for Educators

    Co-sponsored by the Five College Center for East Asian Studies and the Five College Doors to the World Project

    July 9-14, Hampshire College, Amherst, MA
    Priority application deadline: April 3, 2017

    This summer institute studies diversity and representation in global children’s literature about and/or from China, Japan, and Korea. Participants will consider the histories and cultures of these nations to contextualize selected children’s books. They also will engage in dialogue with children’s book authors and illustrators, and children’s literature, culture, and pedagogy specialists to design multimodal learning experiences offering opportunities for children to engage with the themes, words, and images of the books. The institute will culminate with teacher-designed mini-units to support classroom inquiry.

    PreK-grade 3 teachers, librarians and literacy coaches nationwide may apply. Grades 4-5 educators may be given consideration to the extent their application addresses how they use picture books in their grade level teaching. We welcome applications from educators who have previously participated in National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA) seminars, institutes, or other programs. Limited to 25 educators.

    Apply at http://fivecolleges.edu/partnership/doors-to-the-world
    For more information contact: doors2world@gmail.com
    edited by cgao on 3/2/2017
    1/23/2017 12:49:44 AM
    Topic:
    Modern China Assessments in SHEG format

    ctsichlis
    ctsichlis
    Posts: 31
    The following are two assessments that use Modern Chinese History content as opposed the the US content used by the Standford Reading Like a Historian site.

    Portrait of Mao
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1n0dssYIe-_dYe-Q8kDZtPdGzpUUjRNXwjNRUJXvOvQE/edit?usp=sharing

    Battle of Langfang
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1G8mglGNl6afR7DA126GNufaPWTzwZTA6gxL2oLoEu6I/edit?usp=sharing
    1/23/2017 12:09:34 AM
    Topic:
    Art Imitates Life

    ngilliam
    ngilliam
    Posts: 77
    Attached, please find a copy of the unit.

    Thank you for a wonderful experience!
    1/22/2017 8:46:36 PM
    Topic:
    Film Review - "The Gate of Heavenly Peace"

    ngilliam
    ngilliam
    Posts: 77
    Ironically, the film, documentary really, is called "The Gate of Heavenly Peace", and it is anything but that. A[font=Roboto, arial, sans-serif] 1995 documentary film, produced by Richard Gordon and Carma Hinton, the documentary f[/font]ocuses on student led protests, particularly, the Protests in early June, 1989, the film has a tendency to be a little graphic. Documenting Tiananamen Square as the center of student protests, beginning with the May 4th Movement of 1919, the Square, once a field with waist high weeds, has come to be the center of student-led protests.

    There are interviews, actual footage from the days leading up to June 5, and the infamous footage of "Tank Man" himself. There is also, however, footage of wounded students - blood, bandages, and all. Because the documentary is about 3 hours long (yikes!) I definitely would not try to sit and watch the entire thing in one sitting, partly because some of what seem to be the most important parts, interviews and the like, are not translated, making it very difficult to fit together the pieces of the puzzle.

    One suggestion, because there is so much in the documentary that teachers can focus on, would be to only show selected parts, and show those parts as they relate to various literary works. The book Animal Farm comes to mind when the film discusses how Chairman Mao came to power. The very thing that he strived to fight against, was what he became. Some referred to him as being emperor- or god-like. In addition, Teachers could also juxtapose these student led protests to those in the United States during the Civil Rights Movement and the Freedom Rides, or even the protests regarding the Vietnam War.

    There are several versions of the film available on YouTube, however the one with the most translated into English has been divided into two different parts. The links are as follows:
    Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Gtt2JxmQtg
    Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0lgc4fWkWI

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