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5/17/2017 1:32:53 PM
Topic:
Film Review

tphillips
tphillips
Posts: 25
The Karate Kid is a classic. I watched the 2010 version. My students can relate to it better than the original Karate Kid (1984). The students I teach have never been to China, so to engage them in China's setting, one activity required them to draw and label three different sceneries of China that stood out the most to them. They also I had a story map to identify the movies characters, plot, conflict, and resolution. After viewing the film, the students had to respond to a writing prompt. “Use details and facts from the movie to write a multi-paragraph essay explaining: What life lesson does this movie teach young children?” My students had so much to say about the main character (Dre) and his transition with moving to China. I observed many of the students placing themselves in the main characters position making statements on what they would do if they had to live in China. Many students were amazed with the scene of karate teaching. They made comments like: "I want to learn karate", "I can do karate, it's easy", and "karate can help me stand up to a bully." In my opinion, the movie's overall impact on the students focused on standing up for yourself by learning a new skill even if it is challenging. Many student's essays demonstrated their thoughts of the movie reflecting a kid who had to be determine to learn how to fight because that was his way to survive and fit in.
5/14/2017 5:20:56 PM
Topic:
Film Review of Kung Fu Hustle

thp2057
thp2057
Posts: 30
Kids love this movie at the middle school level. Some of the actors from this movie is also in "Shaolin Soccer".
5/10/2017 7:04:52 PM
Topic:
video game set during taiwan's white terror

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1917
Some seeking to teach about Taiwan during its martial law era (1949-1987) may find this video game of interest. I don't believe that you could assign it to students, though I have little doubt that they routinely consume equally or more gruesome films and games. Here's a couple of paragraphs from a South China Morning Post article about the game:
"Detention” was created by Taiwanese developers and takes place during the crackdown on opponents by the ruling nationalist Kuomintang, when the now democratic island was still under martial law.
"The nightmarish 2-D game starts with the disappearance of a teacher, with players acting as two high school students trying to solve the mystery."

The full article with screenshots, etc. is at:
http://www.scmp.com/news/china/policies-politics/article/2072635/game-set-during-taiwans-white-terror-garnering-rave

Though the game has proven popular in Taiwan, it's been well-received elsewhere as well. It seems able to let students get a sense of the period in which the Kuomintang established its control over Taiwan, which had been a Japanese colony from 1895-1945 and had not previously been governed by the KMT.

Here's a link to the game: http://store.steampowered.com/app/555220/agecheck I've not played the game and would be eager to hear what gamers and people from Taiwan think of it. On the download page, > 3,000 have judged the game to be an "overwhelmingly positive" experience. Even if you don't end up playing the game, you may find the sample snippets of interest.

Here's the description from the download site:
"Greenwood high school, located in a remote mountainous area, two students found themselves trapped and vulnerable. The place they once knew has changed in unsettling ways, haunted by evil creatures. To escape, they must explore the mysterious campus filled with ominous objects and puzzles. How will they survive in this ever threatening environment? Could they return to safety in one piece?

"Set in a fictitious world in the 1960s Taiwan under martial law, Detention, the story-driven atmospheric horror incorporated East Asian elements rarely used in games. Taoism, Buddhism, Chinese mythology, the game draws on local Taiwanese cultural references to tell an unique and terrifying story."
edited by Clay Dube on 5/10/2017
5/10/2017 6:24:32 PM
Topic:
become bilingual certified - mandarin or spanish

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1917
If you're proficient in Mandarin or in Spanish and already credentialed in something else, UCLA has a summer program to help you earn your bilingual credential.

http://ucla.us2.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=f727eb7517c7e698c90bd9299&id=1eff839a0c
Why Earn a California Bilingual Authorization?
With a Bilingual Authorization K-12 educators can teach the subject area(s) covered by their primary credential (Single or Multiple Subject) in two languages. With growing research demonstrating the benefits of bilingual education, the number of immersion language classrooms is increasing nationwide. Teachers who are qualified to teach in two languages are now in high demand. As many states have reciprocity agreements with California, teachers holding California credentials can teach in K-12 schools in other states. Out-of-state teachers should check with their state's Department of Education to confirm if a CA credential is accepted.
Coursework
Students in the UCLA Summer Intensive for Bilingual Teachers (SIBT) are required to successfully complete (3.0+ GPA) the three courses below:
413A. Language and Culture: Mandarin | Language and Culture: Spanish (2 units): Focus on language of emphasis for bilingual teachers. Practice in listening, reading, speaking, and writing competencies required for bilingual classrooms. Assessment made at end of course to determine proficiency of Bilingual Authorization Program candidates.
413B. Methodology for Mandarin Language Instruction in a Bilingual Setting | Methodology for Spanish Language Instruction in a Bilingal Setting (2 units): Consideration of models for developing cultural and language skills of home speakers of language of emphasis; practice in use of activities to develop student ability to use language for real-world and academic purposes in culturally appropriate ways. Consideration of models for teaching academic content in primary language for delivery of core curriculum to bilingual students.
413C. Culture of Emphasis: Chinese in California | Culture of Emphasis: Spanish in California (2 units): Discussion of commonalities of culture of emphasis in its home country or countries; major historical periods and events; values, belief systems, and expectations; migration and immigration; historical and contemporary demography. Letter grading.*Language proficiency must be proven through personal interview and the successful passing of Test III of California CSET LOTE examination.
Program Structure and Coursework Requirements
Pre-Assignments (June 26 – July 21)
Prior to the beginning of the 8-day On-Campus Intensive (July 22-29) students will independently complete readings and reflections, as well as language development and assessment assignments for 413A.
8-Day On-Campus Intensive (July 22-29)
During the 8-day Intensive, which will take place on the UCLA campus and at Mark Twain Middle School, students will participate all day (approximately 8am - 5pm) in an integrated model delivered through a combination of lecture and classroom observations and a teaching practicum.
Final Assignments (July 30 – August 18)
Following the 8-day Intensive, students will independently complete and submit to the instructor final course assignments including development of an integrated bilingual unit of instruction, lesson plan portfolio, instructional materials resource binder, cultural mapping project, course readings, reflections and a final project. All assignments and evaluation of teaching practicum during the 8-day intensive will comprise the final grade.
Admission
The program is open to educators from across the US who possess strong English language skills and expertise in either Spanish or Mandarin.
Demonstrating Language Proficiency and Preliminary Registration
Mandarin

The California CTC requires candidates for the Mandarin authorization to prove language proficiency by passing the Subtest III of the CSET Mandarin examination. CSET dates, fees and sample tests can be found on the website. We recommend that SIBT participants take the Mandarin CSET before starting the program. To begin registration for the Mandarin Bilingual Authorization, please complete the Preliminary Registration Form.
Spanish
According to the California CTC, candidates seeking the Spanish Bilingual Authorization must demonstrate a range of language competence equivalent to passing the CSET. While passage of the CSET Spanish is not required for the UCLA SIBT program, candidates must provide evidence of advanced language proficiency. Before being admitted to the SIBT program in Spanish, candidates will therefore be asked to submit a speaking and writing sample. These samples will be evaluated by the instructors to determine eligibility. Demonstrating advanced proficiency is a pre-requisite to participation in the Bilingual Authorization in Spanish. See the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) Proficiency Standards Descriptions found in Appendix C. To begin registration for the Spanish Bilingual Authorization, please complete the Preliminary Registration Form. Once completed, information about the language proficiency evaluation process will be emailed to you.
Program Fees
Registration Fee: $350
Unit Fees: $2052 ($342/unit x 6 units)
Document Fee: $50
Total Program Cost: $2452
This fee information is only an estimate intended to help you plan. Please visit the UCLA Summer Sessions website for fee details, important policies, and deadlines.
5/10/2017 2:55:07 PM
Topic:
Tunnel (2016)

ehong
ehong
Posts: 25
I saw a Korean movie called Tunnel (2016). It was very successful at the Korean box office, which explains why it came to CGV Cinema in the U.S. The movie is about a car salesman (Jungsoo) who is driving home to his wife and kid to celebrate the kid’s birthday. He has a birthday cake and a couple of water bottles in his car. To head home, he drives through Hado Tunnel, but the tunnel collapses and traps him in his car. Eventually, after many weeks, Jungsoo is freed from the wreckage, barely alive. I think the reason this movie was so popular and well-received was because of the social and political commentary the movie was making toward Korean politicians and media in regards to how those two groups publicize tragic events or news stories to gain popularity. In the movie, the politicians and news crews were more concerned with playing up the tragic aspects of the accident, rather than focusing on saving Jungsoo.
I think I would show this movie to my students if we were critically analyzing how media can distort the truth. There have been a lot of “fake news” claims since the recent election, and showing my students the scene in this movie where the local news stations and politicians skew the actual story of Jungsoo, can be a stepping off point for us to have a discussion about how media and political agendas can affect news stories.
5/9/2017 5:09:22 PM
Topic:
world masters in language teaching

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1917
Hi Folks,
Some may be interested in this new USC program. Info sessions are this week!

A recent news release shared the official launch of USC's World Masters in Language Teaching program, a dynamic dual degree program that prepares students to teach English and other languages to a variety of learners in multilingual and multicultural settings around the world. During the program, students spend part of their time at USC in Los Angeles and part of their time at a premier partner university in Hong Kong or South Korea.

The World Masters program will provide language professionals with an international study experience that will deepen their knowledge of language, education, culture and social context. The students you currently work with are especially qualified and competitive for this program, and I welcome you to learn more about this graduate school opportunity.

Higher education professionals and prospective graduate students in the Southern California area are invited to learn more about the program at an upcoming information session this month. Please pass this email invitation along to your own network of colleagues and students:

Wednesday, May 10th at 3:00 PM PST: Online info session Wednesday, May 17th at 12 PM PST: USC on-campus info session (location TBA), we will also be live streaming this info session for those who would like to join remotely RSVP here for further details: https://goo.gl/forms/OydJGEiiYepxEE4A2
5/3/2017 10:39:23 AM
Topic:
Two Free Webinars on East Asian Texts

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 152
Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor's Story
with author Caren Stelson
7-8 p.m. EDT
Young Adult/High School Freeman Book Award honrable mention!
Register here: https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/156825922730581761


Midnight in Broad Daylight
with author Pamela Rotner Sakamoto
7-8 p.m. EDT
Register Here: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/921063470282094851
edited by cgao on 5/3/2017
5/1/2017 9:29:17 PM
Topic:
Japanese Warriors & Food

auroraguzman
auroraguzman
Posts: 11
I felt inspired with all the cuisine history he shared, which left me wanting to know more. I can't wait to share this with my students and maybe make some sushi if it's not to difficult. I have read and seen movies on the 47 Ronin and it has always intrigued me how loyalty and honor can go far. It was surprising to know that they had to register who they were going to kill before they did it and get it approved.
5/1/2017 9:29:17 PM
Topic:
Japanese Warriors & Food

auroraguzman
auroraguzman
Posts: 11
I felt inspired with all the cuisine history he shared, which left me wanting to know more. I can't wait to share this with my students and maybe make some sushi if it's not to difficult. I have read and seen movies on the 47 Ronin and it has always intrigued me how loyalty and honor can go far. It was surprising to know that they had to register who they were going to kill before they did it and get it approved.
5/1/2017 6:42:38 PM
Topic:
Lesson Plan-Legends of Chinese New Year

jshen
jshen
Posts: 19
Chinese New year is also called the Spring Festival, it is the largest festival among Chinese. It has also many legends associated with the customs nowadays. I am attaching the lesson plan for two of the customs: the legend of Nian and the Spring Festival.
5/1/2017 3:02:00 PM
Topic:
Lesson Plan-1st Grade

auroraguzman
auroraguzman
Posts: 11
In celebration of the New Year I had my first grade students learn about Chinese Calligraphy and the importance of Bamboo in the Chinese Culture.
Students watched a video on how to paint bamboo's.
https://ilookchina.com/tag/the-importance-of-bamboo-to-the-chinese/
5/1/2017 11:43:50 AM
Topic:
was korea part of china?

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1917
US Pres. Trump's comments that Chinese President Xi Jinping told him that Korea had been part of China stimulated quick and negative reaction in South Korea (radio report: https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-04-20/trump-outraged-south-koreans-saying-korea-used-be-part-china-he-right; HK newspaper: http://www.scmp.com/news/china/diplomacy-defence/article/2089788/south-koreans-protest-after-trump-says-peninsula-was; Korean paper:http://english.hani.co.kr/arti/english_edition/e_national/791556.html). USC Korea historian Kyung Moon Hwang writes that the problem doesn't start there, but rather with how Chinese history is presented in China, essentially overlooking the messiness of long and complex interactions among the peoples of East Asia, interactions that eventually produced the still-in-flux Chinese, Mongolian, Korean, Japanese, Vietnamese, and other cultures of the region. Read his column here: http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/opinion/2017/04/633_228372.html .
4/23/2017 2:11:10 PM
Topic:
Tale of Genji Movie Lady Murasaki-Very Long Hair

thp2057
thp2057
Posts: 30
In preparation for Professor Miyake’s lecture on Literature from Japan’s Classical and Warrior Age, I watched a film from YouTube to have a better background to Murasaki Shikibu’s “The Tale of Genji”. The film is 2 hours and 16 minutes, “Tale of Genji Movie Lady Murasaki-Very Long Hair Lady from Japan” that can be found at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXwSIE2cm88.
The film is about the 11th century love story centers on the life of Prince Genji through the eyes of his lovers and court artisans. Though I had doubts early on, the story is so interesting that I could not pause to see what happens next. Watching the film allowed me to have a better understanding of Japan’s aristocracy intrigues and rivalries of court life, and the importance of poetry literacy.
For secondary students, I would play certain clips along with the institute provided readings into the Japan unit. For instance, students will examine the scenes of the emperor’s court, the artisans, and the importance of poetry during this age.
4/22/2017 3:18:02 PM
Topic:
Confucius

jshen
jshen
Posts: 19
Yes, I agree with you that this could be a good movie to show the students about the life of Confucius. But I also can understand your concern of the students' attention span. This movie demands a lot of thinking and focus skills.
4/22/2017 1:22:05 PM
Topic:
Film Review - To Live

jshen
jshen
Posts: 19
As a Mandarin Teacher, I had watched this movie several times with my students, and in every post movie discussion, besides the different culture background, almost all the students could resonate the main theme of the movie and agreed that this is a very touching movie.
" To Live" is a simple title, but it conceals a universe. In Chinese, "活着“means more close to " To be living". The impression part of this movie is unlike other historical documentary movies, it reveals the historical events in China since 1940s by the end of the last dynasty-Qing, to the 8 years of China-Japan war, then the 10 years of Chinese Civil War, followed later on the 10 years of the Cultural Revolution. The movie shows how these big events affected a regular family, their fierce struggles with fate. their hope is basically summed up by the wife who loses wealth and position and children and who says," all I ask is a quiet life together."
Most of my students resonate that life is hard, yet it has to be going on, we are still struggling " To Live".
4/10/2017 7:30:16 PM
Topic:
focus on the qin and han dynasties

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1917
https://www.wsj.com/articles/age-of-empires-chinese-art-of-the-qin-and-han-dynasties-221-b-c-a-d-220-review-treasures-of-nation-building-1491735606

The Wall Street Journal article above discusses a new exhibition at NY's Metropolitan Museum of Art: Age of Empires. The exhibition runs through July 16. The article notes that this is the second such exhibition bringing to America some of the archeological discoveries of the past 50 years. The exhibition draws on more than 30 museums and institutions. And a third exhibition is scheduled for the China Institute later this year.

Museum website: http://www.metmuseum.org/press/exhibitions/2016/age-of-empires

Our generous supporter, the Freeman Foundation, underwrote the education programs the Met is planning.
edited by Clay Dube on 4/10/2017
4/7/2017 2:39:27 PM
Topic:
Immersive Int'l Studies Summer Institute at UCLA

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 152
UCLA is pleased to announce a new 1-week intensive summer program for high school students using "Defining a Nation: India on the Eve of Independence, 1945" from the Reacting to the Past series of immersive role-playing games. Students will be able to earn 2 college credits while learning about India at the end of British colonial rule. Students will take on roles as actual or fictional people living in India in 1945, and debate how to shape a postcolonial India.

More information is available at: http://summer.ucla.edu/institutes/ImmersiveInternationalStudies

This video shows the student perspective of the India game, as played with Barnard and Columbia students: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3uCVqqIuM4&feature=youtu.be

Please contact Jennifer Jung-Kim at jungkim@ucla.edu if you have questions.
edited by cgao on 4/7/2017
4/4/2017 9:59:13 AM
Topic:
Free books for classrooms

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 152
In the pursuit of making the Chinese Language teaching materials available in North America, the Hanban / Confucius Institute Headquarters is offering donation of Chinese Language Teaching Materials to benefit students under your jurisdiction, as well as to those schools / school districts that have a Chinese Language Program in place and to those that are interested in launching one in the near future.


At the moment, there are only 30 parcels (500 books in each parcel) of materials left. We encourage you to further share the books with your local schools / school districts that have a Chinese Language Program. Each parcel includes: textbooks, multi-media DVDs, CDs and a host of reading materials, which adds up to a generous grant of USD 5,000 for each recipient. Over the years, a total of more than 1,700 US schools had adopted our teaching materials.


Please take advantage of this offer. If any of you are interested, simply apply online at: http://hanban.ca/donation. Donation is on first-come-first-served basis.


For more information, please contact info@hanban.ca or (604) 662-8498.
edited by cgao on 4/4/2017
3/30/2017 10:46:12 AM
Topic:
Film Review - "The Gate of Heavenly Peace"

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1917
Outstanding recommendations. I like Nikki's suggestion of pairing this discussion with Animal Farm (see Chinese editions: https://twitter.com/claydube/status/824333295005511680 ). There is an educational version that schools/districts may wish to purchase:

Amazon https://www.amazon.com/Gate-Heavenly-Peace-Tiananmen-Square/dp/1463103743

Center for Asian American Media http://caamedia.org/films/gate-of-heavenly-peace/

The main website for the documentary is at: http://www.tsquare.tv/ It includes a lot of useful resources for teachers.

Two other films about the Tiananmen demonstrations are: part 3 "Born under the Red Flag" of the China: A Century of Revolution Series
https://zeitgeistfilms.com/film/chinaacenturyofrevolution

And our film on media coverage of the demonstrations: http://china.usc.edu/assignment-china-tiananmen-square
also at our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ho8vAFlCeFQ&index=8&list=PLZoSvm2n7tkcHkxfcRuu0B5N0QSnBfzSd

Finally, you may find this talk about suppression of the history of Tiananmen of use: http://china.usc.edu/video-tiananmen-revisited-louisa-lim

A collection of resources: http://china.usc.edu/tags/tiananmen
3/27/2017 10:35:32 AM
Topic:
U.S.-China Relations through the Scope of History

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 152
U.S.-China Relations through the Scope of History

Date: Wednesday, April 26th
Time: 4:30 PM-7:30 PM
Location: Pacific Science Center

4:30-5:00 Introduction and curricular connections
5:00-6:00 Explore the Terracotta Warriors Exhibit
6:00-7:30 Program with John Pomfret

Registration fee: $30

Explore the one-of-a-kind Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor exhibit and then join us for a conversation with John Pomfret, former Washington post bureau chief in Beijing, and the author of The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom. Mr. Pomfret will discuss U.S.-China relations in a new administration, thinking about the ways that history informs current politics.

The first 30 registrants will receive a free copy of John Pomfret’s book, The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: America and China, 1776 to the Present.

Our Featured Speaker:

Raised in New York City and educated at Stanford and Nanjing universities, John Pomfret is an award-winning journalist with The Washington Post. He has been a foreign correspondent for 15 years, covering big wars and small in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Congo, Sri Lanka, Iraq, southwestern Turkey and northeastern Iran. Pomfret has spent seven years covering China – one in the late 1980s during the Tiananmen Square protests and then from 1998 until the end of 2003 as the bureau chief for The Washington Post in Beijing. In 2003, Pomfret was awarded the Osborne Elliot Award for the best coverage of Asia by the Asia Society.

He is the author of the acclaimed book, Chinese Lessons, and has won several awards for his coverage of Asia, including the Osborne Elliot Prize. He holds a BA and MA from Stanford University and attended Singapore’s Institute of Southeast Asian Studies as a Fulbright Scholar. Pomfret speaks, reads and writes Mandarin, having spent two years at Nanjing University in the early 1980s as part of one of the first groups of American students to study in China.

Registration fee:

$30, includes resource packet, entrance to exhibit, light dinner, and three OSPI clock hours

You can find more details on the World Affairs Council website.

Register Now

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