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3/27/2017 10:35:32 AM
Topic:
U.S.-China Relations through the Scope of History

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 142
U.S.-China Relations through the Scope of History

Date: Wednesday, April 26th
Time: 4:30 PM-7:30 PM
Location: Pacific Science Center

4:30-5:00 Introduction and curricular connections
5:00-6:00 Explore the Terracotta Warriors Exhibit
6:00-7:30 Program with John Pomfret

Registration fee: $30

Explore the one-of-a-kind Terracotta Warriors of the First Emperor exhibit and then join us for a conversation with John Pomfret, former Washington post bureau chief in Beijing, and the author of The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom. Mr. Pomfret will discuss U.S.-China relations in a new administration, thinking about the ways that history informs current politics.

The first 30 registrants will receive a free copy of John Pomfret’s book, The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: America and China, 1776 to the Present.

Our Featured Speaker:

Raised in New York City and educated at Stanford and Nanjing universities, John Pomfret is an award-winning journalist with The Washington Post. He has been a foreign correspondent for 15 years, covering big wars and small in Afghanistan, Bosnia, Congo, Sri Lanka, Iraq, southwestern Turkey and northeastern Iran. Pomfret has spent seven years covering China – one in the late 1980s during the Tiananmen Square protests and then from 1998 until the end of 2003 as the bureau chief for The Washington Post in Beijing. In 2003, Pomfret was awarded the Osborne Elliot Award for the best coverage of Asia by the Asia Society.

He is the author of the acclaimed book, Chinese Lessons, and has won several awards for his coverage of Asia, including the Osborne Elliot Prize. He holds a BA and MA from Stanford University and attended Singapore’s Institute of Southeast Asian Studies as a Fulbright Scholar. Pomfret speaks, reads and writes Mandarin, having spent two years at Nanjing University in the early 1980s as part of one of the first groups of American students to study in China.

Registration fee:

$30, includes resource packet, entrance to exhibit, light dinner, and three OSPI clock hours

You can find more details on the World Affairs Council website.

Register Now
3/23/2017 3:01:28 PM
Topic:
Neighborhoods in Japan, July 10 - 14, 2017

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 142
Neighborhoods in Japan:

Learning and Teaching about Community through Stories, Videos, and Images

An NCTA seminar for teachers of grades 2-8

July 10 - 14, 2017
8:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m. (Mon-Fri)
At the University of Washington in Seattle

Apply by March 31st

Seminar leader: Patricia Burleson with guest segments led by Professor Robert Pekannen and longtime EARC collaborator Oralee Kramer

Neighborhoods in Japan will use stories, videos, and images to build an understanding of community life in Japan today. The seminar’s guiding question will be “How can we introduce our students to diverse stories of life in Japan?” In addition to exploring a rich variety of resources, the week will focus on adapting content and materials for use in your grade 2-8 classroom. We'll use books such as I Live in Tokyo, The Wakame Gatherers, and the 2016 verse novel Up from the Sea, among others.

University of Washington Professor Robert Pekannen will join us to discuss his latest research on how strong neighborhood associations contribute to quality of life and effective governance in Japan.

Seminar goals:
• Learn about multiple characteristics and ways of life in a variety of Japanese neighborhoods.
• Encourage students to explore ways of living in neighborhoods in another country.
• Compare and contrast neighborhoods in Japan with your local neighborhoods through features such as police and fire departments, places of worship, and shops.
• Consider how neighborhoods contribute to a sense of identity and belonging.
• Discover common and unique neighborhood festivals.
• Study maps for hints about neighborhood characteristics and history.
Teachers will leave the seminar with:
• Reliable resources, including several books, and knowledge to support their teaching of Japanese culture in their curriculum
• Creative ideas, lessons, and activities ready to use in their classrooms
• An interest in learning more about life in Japan
• A framework for exploring neighborhoods in other countries

Please refer to the application for additional details and eligibility requirements.
3/22/2017 3:19:47 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1908
Many of you are already reading Education about Asia, but for those who aren't, this is a great opportunity to acquaint yourself with this tremendous resource. Be sure to sign up for email updates from the magazine. The links below are to articles from back issues of the magazine.

A review of one of my favorite films, To Live (book by Yu Hua, film directed by Zhang Yimou), a review of the book (which differs from the film in significant ways), an interview with author Yu Hua

A review of the SPICE unit on the Cultural Revolution (which won an award from the Association for Asian Studies); an excerpt from the unit is available here; the unit is available for purchase here.

A lesson plan about the Cultural Revolution by Deborah Pellikan

A review of a book on posters from the Cultural Revolution

A review of the Tim Cheek book, Mao Zedong and China's Revolutions

An article by Yihong Pan on "From Red Guards to Thinking Individuals: China's Youth in the Cultural Revolution"

A look at pre-collegiate US textbook treatments of Mao's rule by Philip Williams
edited by Clay Dube on 3/22/2017
3/22/2017 3:08:27 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1908
Stan Rosen will be speaking at the workshop about film during the Cultural Revolution and films about the Cultural Revolution.

Here are three articles about the topic:

Jin Feng, "Teaching China’s Cultural Revolution through Film: Blue Kite as a Case Study," Asian Network Exchange

May 15, 2016, Straits Times - "50 years on, Cultural Revolution still off limits in films, books in China"

Positions (academic journal) - "Disappearance of Animals in Animated Films of the Cultural Revolution"
edited by Clay Dube on 3/22/2017
3/22/2017 3:07:03 PM
Topic:
East Asian Philosophies and Religions

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 142
East Asian Philosophies and Religions:A Visual and Literary Introduction

An NCTA seminar for teachers of all grade levels

July 24 - 28, 2017
8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. (Mon-Thurs)
8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m (Fri)

Apply by March 31st

Seminar leader: Melanie King, Art History faculty at Seattle Central College

East Asian Philosophies and Religions: A Visual and Literary Introduction will explore the key philosophical and religious traditions that underlie East Asian belief systems, historically as well as in the present.

Our course of study will focus on the emergence of Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism, and Shinto within their original contexts, but will also consider how these traditions evolved as they moved across space and time. We will examine art and literature to familiarize ourselves with each tradition’s associated doctrines, objects and places of worship, and practices. As we analyze these sources, we will pay special attention to the impacts of cultural transmission, both on the traditions themselves and East Asian cultures they influenced.

By examining artworks and reading primary and secondary documents, we will also identify resources for inclusion in the classroom. No prior knowledge of the subject matter is required.


Topics covered will include:

Confucius and The Analects
Laozi and Daoism
Legalism and Qinshihuangdi’s Army
Emergence of Buddhism
Buddhism along the Silk Road
Transmission of Buddhism into Korea
Shinto
Chan (Zen) Buddhist traditions
20th Century East Asian Art

Please refer to the application for additional details and eligibility requirements.
edited by cgao on 3/22/2017
3/21/2017 1:56:41 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1908
Geremie Barmé's Shades of Mao includes examples of Maospeak, that strange language that was rapidly adopted and then dropped in China. The examples are from novelist Wang Shuo 王朔 and are found at the highly recommended Morning Sun website: http://www.morningsun.org/red/wangshuo.html

The Morning Sun library offers many primary sources as well as analytical pieces: http://www.morningsun.org/library/index.html

Among the items there is an article from China Reconstructs, a state publication, on how "The Red Guards Battle Song" was born:
http://www.morningsun.org/smash/cr_3_1968.html

You can hear the song (and watch Mao driving through Red Guard masses at Tiananmen Square) at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyTIamfYve0
3/21/2017 1:08:04 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1908
This is another reading that problematizes our understanding of the Cultural Revolution. In it Barbara Mittler discusses how and why propaganda posters, songs, and films from the Cultural Revolution remain popular among many. She notes that isn't the case for Nazi propaganda.

She writes, "at least to German ears, propaganda is evil. It amounts to nothing but blatant lies and false pretense. Propaganda is manipulated and manipulative. Whenever propaganda has an effect, this is bound to be negative; an enthusiastic recipient of propaganda cannot but be deluded. A system creating propaganda is to be despised; everybody hopes for it to end. The times in which propaganda flourishes are considered unhappy times, times that everybody hopes will pass very quickly."

How, Mittler asks, is it that propaganda from a time when many Chinese suffered is still attractive to many Chinese?

Download the article at: https://www.amphilsoc.org/sites/default/files/proceedings/1520404.pdf

And consider this cultural revolution parody. A mug sitting on my desk calls for us "to serve renminbi" (RMB, the currency), a play on Mao's dictate that all should strive to serve the people.
3/21/2017 12:02:42 PM
Topic:
teaching about the cultural revolution

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1908
Hi Folks,

Our workshop is Saturday, March 25. Have you signed up already? (details here) If you have, you've received access to special readings. Here I just want to share an issue of Peking Review (now published as Beijing Review). This is the August 16, 1968 issue. For the workshop, please read the article on pages 21-25, "Mao Tse-tung's Thought Directs Us in Battle: How we removed a 45 kg tumour." It includes,

"After more than a dozen hours of arduous work, the fighters boundlessly loyal to Chairman Mao's revolutionary line finally succeeded in wholly removing the 45-kg tumour from Chang Chiu'chu's body.

"After she regained consciousness, Chang Chiu-chu was extremely excited when she felt her abdomen. The very first words she uttered were: 'Long live Chairman Mao! Chairman Mao has saved me!' Mao Tse-tung's thought gave her boundless strength and vitality."

Read the attached story for details.

You may find other parts of this issue of the Peking Review of interest. See it at https://www.marxists.org/subject/china/peking-review/1968/PR1968-33.pdf The first pages are devoted to quotations from Mao, but also check out Mao's comments on and photos from the struggle of African Americans for justice.

Please comment on these materials. Peking Review issues from those days can't be found on the current Beijing Review website (http://bjreview.com). You can find them at: https://www.marxists.org/subject/china/peking-review/
edited by Clay Dube on 3/21/2017
3/13/2017 3:00:28 PM
Topic:
Graphic Novels and Cultural Authenticity

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 142
East Asian Literature in Your ClassroomGraphic Novels and Cultural Authenticity
Saturday, April 29, 2017
9:00 am - 4:00 pm
University of Washington in Seattle
Participants are invited to arrive as early as 8:30 am for coffee and conversation.

This one-day workshop will give teachers the opportunity to think deeply about “picture telling” in the art forms of the picture book, manga/graphic literature, and anime. Mary Roberts will demonstrate ways to evaluate materials for accurate content and cultural authenticity. Then, using provided texts such as Are You An Echo?: The Lost Poetry of Misuzu Kaneko, American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang, and Pyongyang: A Journey to North Korea by Guy Delisle, you'll have a chance to practice these skills and discuss the implications of "picture telling" with other participants. Mary will also highlight a variety of other quality classroom instructional materials for children and young adults that contribute meaningfully to an understanding of China, Japan, and Korea.

Qualifications
This workshop is open to all current K12 educators. No prior knowledge of East Asian literature or familiarity with manga and graphic novels is assumed.

Benefits
  • 6 Washington State OSPI clock hours
  • Free copies of the workshop texts and handouts
  • Lunch provided
  • One-year subscription to Education about Asia

  • Registration info

  • There is a $30 registration fee.
  • Registrations will be accepted on a rolling basis until the workshop reaches capacity (20 participants).
  • This workshop is open to all current K12 educators. No prior knowledge of East Asian literature is assumed.

  • Registration fee

    After submitting the registration form below, send your $30 check payable to "University of Washington" to:
    East Asia Resource Center
    UW Box 353650
    Seattle, WA 98195

    Sponsorship
    This NCTA workshop is sponsored by the East Asia Resource Center with funding from a Freeman Foundation grant in support of the National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA).

    Register here.

    edited by cgao on 3/13/2017
    3/2/2017 2:00:31 PM
    Topic:
    Doors to the World: East Asia Summer Institute for Educators

    cgao
    cgao
    Administrator
    Posts: 142
    Doors to the World: East Asia Summer Institute for Educators

    Co-sponsored by the Five College Center for East Asian Studies and the Five College Doors to the World Project

    July 9-14, Hampshire College, Amherst, MA
    Priority application deadline: April 3, 2017

    This summer institute studies diversity and representation in global children’s literature about and/or from China, Japan, and Korea. Participants will consider the histories and cultures of these nations to contextualize selected children’s books. They also will engage in dialogue with children’s book authors and illustrators, and children’s literature, culture, and pedagogy specialists to design multimodal learning experiences offering opportunities for children to engage with the themes, words, and images of the books. The institute will culminate with teacher-designed mini-units to support classroom inquiry.

    PreK-grade 3 teachers, librarians and literacy coaches nationwide may apply. Grades 4-5 educators may be given consideration to the extent their application addresses how they use picture books in their grade level teaching. We welcome applications from educators who have previously participated in National Consortium for Teaching about Asia (NCTA) seminars, institutes, or other programs. Limited to 25 educators.

    Apply at http://fivecolleges.edu/partnership/doors-to-the-world
    For more information contact: doors2world@gmail.com
    edited by cgao on 3/2/2017
    1/23/2017 12:49:44 AM
    Topic:
    Modern China Assessments in SHEG format

    ctsichlis
    ctsichlis
    Posts: 31
    The following are two assessments that use Modern Chinese History content as opposed the the US content used by the Standford Reading Like a Historian site.

    Portrait of Mao
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1n0dssYIe-_dYe-Q8kDZtPdGzpUUjRNXwjNRUJXvOvQE/edit?usp=sharing

    Battle of Langfang
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1G8mglGNl6afR7DA126GNufaPWTzwZTA6gxL2oLoEu6I/edit?usp=sharing
    1/23/2017 12:09:34 AM
    Topic:
    Art Imitates Life

    ngilliam
    ngilliam
    Posts: 77
    Attached, please find a copy of the unit.

    Thank you for a wonderful experience!
    1/22/2017 8:46:36 PM
    Topic:
    Film Review - "The Gate of Heavenly Peace"

    ngilliam
    ngilliam
    Posts: 77
    Ironically, the film, documentary really, is called "The Gate of Heavenly Peace", and it is anything but that. A[font=Roboto, arial, sans-serif] 1995 documentary film, produced by Richard Gordon and Carma Hinton, the documentary f[/font]ocuses on student led protests, particularly, the Protests in early June, 1989, the film has a tendency to be a little graphic. Documenting Tiananamen Square as the center of student protests, beginning with the May 4th Movement of 1919, the Square, once a field with waist high weeds, has come to be the center of student-led protests.

    There are interviews, actual footage from the days leading up to June 5, and the infamous footage of "Tank Man" himself. There is also, however, footage of wounded students - blood, bandages, and all. Because the documentary is about 3 hours long (yikes!) I definitely would not try to sit and watch the entire thing in one sitting, partly because some of what seem to be the most important parts, interviews and the like, are not translated, making it very difficult to fit together the pieces of the puzzle.

    One suggestion, because there is so much in the documentary that teachers can focus on, would be to only show selected parts, and show those parts as they relate to various literary works. The book Animal Farm comes to mind when the film discusses how Chairman Mao came to power. The very thing that he strived to fight against, was what he became. Some referred to him as being emperor- or god-like. In addition, Teachers could also juxtapose these student led protests to those in the United States during the Civil Rights Movement and the Freedom Rides, or even the protests regarding the Vietnam War.

    There are several versions of the film available on YouTube, however the one with the most translated into English has been divided into two different parts. The links are as follows:
    Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Gtt2JxmQtg
    Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0lgc4fWkWI
    1/22/2017 7:07:21 PM
    Topic:
    Economics: Great Leap Forward vs. SEZs

    jdoll
    jdoll
    Posts: 39
    Economics Lesson:
    China’s Great Leap Forward vs. Special Economic Zones

    Objectives: Students will study the differences between communism and capitalism through an examination of two famous and very different attempts at economic modernization in China. The focus of the lesson is a contrast between the Great Leap Forward and Special Economic Zones (SEZs).

    CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC CONTENT STANDARDS:
    12.1 Students understand common economic terms and concepts and economic reasoning.
    12.2 Students analyze the elements of America’s market economy in a global setting.
    CCSS.ELA-LITERACY
    RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
    RH.11-12.9 Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

    Continuum: This lesson will fall between a lesson contrasting Command and Market economies, and a lesson on mixed economies.

    · This lesson will take 3-4 class periods depending on level of students.

    Day 1: Great Leap Forward
    · Students will watch video: Great Leap Forward Summary (6 min)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlbB3cmgPmo
    · Students will close read “China's Great Famine: the true story,” answering 3 sets of questions on each consecutive read.
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jan/01/china-great-famine-book-tombstone

    Close Read Questions #1
    1. Who is Yang Jisheng?
    2. What year did the Communists take power in China?
    3. What was the officials’ response to the head of the production brigade?
    4. How many people does Yang believe died in the famine?
    5. What is the name of Yang’s book?
    Close Read Questions #2
    1. Why did Yang feel the deaths were personal tragedies and not the fault of the government when he was 18?
    2. How did Yang get access to official records to write his book?
    3. How does the Communist party view the famine?
    4. What is the official death toll of the famine?
    5. What role did Mao play in the famine according to Yang?
    Close Read Questions #3
    1. Describe the famine that resulted from the Great Leap Forward, use details from the article.
    2. Why do you think the Communist Party still refuses to take responsibility in the famine?
    3. What makes Yang’s book so important to China and the rest of the world?
    4. How was the Great Leap Forward possible in a command economy?

    Day 2-3: Special Economic Zones (SEZs)
    · Students will watch video: Special Economic Zones in China (2 min)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND_Y4hfkesA
    · Students will watch video: Econ 1.6- Economic Systems: Why is Communist China doing so well? (4 min)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPpmAUk1olA
    · Students will read “The Development of China’s Special Economic Zones,” answering 3 sets of questions on each consecutive read.
    http://internshipschina.com/development-chinas-special-economic-zones/

    Close Read Questions #1
    1. What is a SEZ?
    2. What is a Free Trade Zone (FTZ)?
    3. What are Economic and Technological Development Zones (ETDZs)?
    4. How do SEZs attract foreign investment?
    Close Read Questions #2
    1. What city will be the trial for FTZs?
    2. How have SEZs opened China to ideas inherent with capitalism and the relaxation of government economic controls?
    3. What kind of incentives are SEZs given in China?
    Close Read Questions #3
    1. How have SEZs acted as windows to foreign investment in China?
    2. Describe how SEZs have acted as “radiators” to accelerated inland economic development?
    3. Does the development of SEZs and FTZs mean China is no longer Communist? Explain?
    Jigsaw activity: Students will get into groups and research one of the following SEZs: Shantou, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Xiamen, Dalian, Qinhuangdao, Tianjin, Yantai, Qingdao, Lianyungang, Nantong, Shanghai, Ningbo, Wenzhou, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Zhanjiang, and Beihai.
    Groups will become “experts on their SEZ and present their findings to the rest of the class. Information must include:
    · Location on map of China
    · Type of industries promoted
    · Incentives given to foreign investors
    · Effect of SEZ on local economy
    Day 4: Assessment
    Students will write a short essay with the following prompt: How did the Great Leap Forward affect economic policy in China?
    1/22/2017 2:22:02 PM
    Topic:
    Film Review: China Blue (2005)

    ctsichlis
    ctsichlis
    Posts: 31
    Although it turned out to be a little older than I thought, I strongly recommend this film because I think it is very relatable and brings up a number of issues--ethics, economics, government responsibility, labor practices, globalization, etc.

    China Blue is an independent film that masterfully shows how the global economy impacts individuals. Filmed without the approval of Chinese authorities, it follows a young girl who migrates from a countryside village where she takes a job at a blue jean factory. It films not only the lives of the workers, but also the pressure on the factory owner, and his deals with a variety of international buyers. It is a deeply fascinating film that puts a human face to globalization.

    For students, it is a great way to view the other side of the economy that they participate in. After seeing this, I decided I would like to to use it for my Geography class and pair it with a discussion of ethics, the guiding question: Are we participating in unethical behavior when we buy outsourced materials? To help students, it would be good to front load them with some statistical facts about globalization and US-China trade relations. Also, I would like to create a viewers guide, that has questions to help students pay attention to certain actions as the watch the film. The ultimate goal would be an informed discussion, not only about the film, but their choices in the economy and its ethical implications, if any.




    Movie Webpage
    http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/chinablue/

    Ethics & Economics Lesson Plan
    http://www.pbs.org/pov/lasttrainhome/lesson-plan-1/

    Study Guide by Eli D. Friedman at UC Berkeley
    http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/guides/chinaguide.pdf
    1/22/2017 10:59:08 AM
    Topic:
    Film Review - To Live

    rcharles
    rcharles
    Posts: 35
    Students will research and develop an understanding of the human experience in a culture that is in some ways the mirror opposite of their own. In a time in which capitalism in China bodes the same reaction socialists did in America, students will investigate the role of the government and how much control it should have on the lives of its citizens. Exploring a culture through the arts makes accessible qualities that cannot be quantified in the black and white texts of historical fact telling. The Film To Live was window into a world that is the mirror opposite of Western Culture at the time. It helps to not just understand the what but the why, the subjective and the visceral. This film is a great way for students to travel through the milestones that we will discuss in class such as The Great Leap Forward and The Cultural Revolution or even to look at ways being labeled a “capitalist” impacted citizens much in the same way being labeled a “communist” destroyed lives here in the U.S. The film really makes the hardships of The Cultural Revolution accessible to students who would otherwise not have a point of reference. Students will compare and contrast Zhang Yimou’s work in To Live to that in House of the Flying Daggers. These films are so visually different I think that its not only a testament to how he’s evolving as a filmmaker, but also how he is being shaped as a storyteller evolving as an artist within the confines of Chinese Censorship. We will also discuss media representations with discussion about the lead character Fugui (Ge You) who is not featured on the movie poster, but is replaced by his wife Jiazhen (Gong Li) who was also banned from making films as a result of her role in this film.
    edited by rcharles on 1/22/2017
    1/21/2017 11:07:23 PM
    Topic:
    Documentary Filmmaking - Video 1 - Asia

    rcharles
    rcharles
    Posts: 35
    VIDEO PRODUCTION 2 – DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING

    Rationale: Students will broaden their social and cultural awareness by exploring media depictions, representations and identity. Students will identify how the professional elements of documentary filmmaking are used to create effective non-fiction human experiences by viewing a series of documentaries and journalistic programs centered around Asian culture over the course of two weeks. This unit is will be integral in helping students understand the differences between sympathy and empathy and how understanding that difference will allow students to effectively value the inclusion of the human experience (increasing the quality of the film) equally important to the quantifiable data and evidence necessary to complete the project.

    Skill and Content Objectives [font=" lato="" light","serif"]CCSS.ELA-Literacy.rh.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.[/font]

    POINT OF VIEW

    Lesson 1 – Understanding the Role of Documentaries
    Role #1 - CHALLENGE belief systems in order to CHANGE point of view. Students will explore how the filmmaker’s point of view can influence the audience’s point of view.

    Pre Screening Exercise
    Write two paragraphs (1) for and (2) against the existence the pursuit of money and power.
    Students have to challenge their own biases on capitalism to provide an argument on both sides.

    Watch Iron Moon [screened in class]
    [Worksheet #1] - Describe how this documentary uses beliefs/values (on the subject of wealth) to challenge perception and change point of view?

    Discussion
    Evidence – Proof: what we hear and see as evidence.

    Experts – Who are they? How do they influence the audience? Are they qualified? Who were not included?

    Purpose – What is the goal of this documentary? What does it want to accomplish?

    Appeal – How does the video appeal to your emotions? Logic? How was it visually appealing?

    Target Audience – Who was the video made for? If you change the target audience, how would it change the video?

    VALIDITY OF TESTIMONY - A

    Lesson 2 – Testimony part 1

    Evaluating the validity of testimony and the faultiness of memory.

    Watch In Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan, director Megumi Nishikura [screened in class]

    [Worksheet #2] Students evaluate the reliability of memory and critically analyzing the motivations of the interviewees.

    Discussion
    Evidence – Proof: what we hear and see as evidence.

    Experts – Who are they? How do they influence the audience? Are they qualified? Who were not included?

    Purpose – What is the goal of this documentary? What does it want to accomplish?


    Target Audience – Who was the video made for? If you change the target audience, how would it change the video?

    In the video, what may be some reasons the people chose to do the show.

    In the video, the interviewers based their claims on their memory of the events and how they believed they experienced them. What’s wrong with relying on memory?

    In the video, what forms of persuasion did the video use to convince you of the events?

    VALIDITY OF TESTIMONY - B

    Lesson 3 – Testimony part 2 (The Value of Memory/Testimony)

    Evaluating the value of testimony and the impact of emotional memory. The differences between Sympathy and Empathy: sympathy is feeling compassion, sorrow, or pity for the hardships that another person encounters, while empathy is putting yourself in the shoes of another. Students will explore how documentaries activate empathy to appeal to audiences with reenactments, emotional testimonies through the function of memory.
    [Worksheet #3, 4 & 5]

    Students will write a paragraph detailing their 1st memory and discuss the challenges of the exercise.

    Students will complete a roll play memory exercise reenacting the details of Rebecca Chan’s account [SEE ATTACHED] with the use of visuals and audio.

    Students will read her actual account and compare and contrast the exercise to her memory. We will then discuss the value of her memory.

    Discussion Part A will center around these questions:
    Do you think Rebecca Chan’s memory is faulty? Why or why not?
    Do you think your first memory is faulty? Why or why not?
    What value does memory have in documentaries if memories can be faulty?
    What value does your memory have to you and why might that be important to an audience?

    Discussion Part B The differences between Sympathy and Empathy. Sympathy is feeling compassion, sorrow, or pity for the hardships that another person encounters, while empathy is putting yourself in the shoes of another.
    How does testimony and memory create empathy?
    Did you sympathize with Rebecca Chan or empathize with her, and why?
    How does testimony and memory create empathy during emotional interviews?
    How would it make you feel for people to question the integrity of your first memory, and why?
    How does testimony and memory create empathy with re-enactments?


    Evidence of Achievement
    [font=Times]After forming groups, students will create a presentation pitch of their documentary topic to dissect the appeal (emotional vs. logical), type of experts and evidence that may be used, as well as the purpose (who is their target audience and what do they want the viewer to do/understand) before filming begins. 10 points extra credit will be award if students incorporate an Asian element into their topic and/or material presented in the documentary.[/font]
    edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017
    edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017
    1/21/2017 10:00:33 PM
    Topic:
    Film Review

    rcharles
    rcharles
    Posts: 35
    Students will research and develop an understanding of the human experience in a culture that is the mirror opposite of their own. In a time in which capitalism in China bodes the same reaction socialists did in America, students will investigate the role of the government and how much control it should have on the lives of its citizens. Exploring a culture through the arts makes accessible qualities that cannot be quantified in the black and white texts of historical fact telling. The Film To Live was window into a world that is the mirror opposite of Western Culture. It helps to not just understand the what but the why, the subjective and the visceral. This film is a great way for students to travel through the milestones that we will discuss in class such as The Great Leap Forward and The Cultural Revolution or even to look at ways being labeled a “capitalist” impacted citizens much in the same way being labeled a “communist” destroyed lives here in the U.S. The film really makes the hardships of The Cultural Revolution accessible to students who would otherwise not have a point of reference. Students will compare and contrast Zhang Yimou’s work in To Live to that in House of the Flying Daggers. These films are so visually different I think that its not only a testament to how he’s evolving as a filmmaker, but also how he is being shaped as a storyteller evolving as an artist within the confines of Chinese Censorship. We will also discuss media representations with discussion about the lead character Fugui (Ge You) who is not featured on the movie poster, but is replaced by his wife Jiazhen (Gong Li) who was also banned from making films as a result of her role in this film.
    edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017
    1/19/2017 9:32:16 PM
    Topic:
    Ties that bind, Ties that break novel study

    cmorgan
    cmorgan
    Posts: 63
    I have chosen to submit a lesson plan for the novel Ties that Bind, Ties that break by Lensey Namioka. This novel explores the issue of foot binding.

    Day One: Introduce what foot binding is by showing them pictures of women that have their feet bound. You can find them on Google under images on footbinding. I brought up images that were not super graphic, but conveyed the practice of foot binding. I also have a discussion about why they practiced footbinding and what it meant. The class distinction and the government at the time. Quick write for this day is : “ Would you be willing to give up opportunities to marry and lead a life like everyone else your age? Could you stand up for what you believed or wanted, even though everyone was against you?”

    Day Two: Pass out study guides (see attached) and begin instructing the students as to how you want them filled out. Remind them that the test will be just like the study guide. Begin chapter one. You can choose to have them read or you can read. I like to play the novel on audiobook, and they have this book on Audible, Amazon’s sight. The lady reading it has a great voice and is easy to understand. I fill out the study guide with them after each chapter and discuss as we go. Quick Write: “ Why was footbinding first started and why do you think that more women didn’t protest the practice?”

    Day three-? I continue on with the chapters reading and discussing and filling out the study guides.

    Final days… I allow the students to work in groups to study and prepare for the test. I also take this opportunity for a rich discussion of the students feelings and thoughts on family influence, foot binding and any other topics they come up with. I also tie it back in with the original anchor unit of Conformity versus Individuality. I would then give the final test after study time. Attached are the study guide and test. They were not created by me but on teachers pay teachers by Angela Bihn.















    Ties that Bind, Ties that Break Study Guide

    Name________________________________ Date_____________________ Class_____________________

    Prologue
    1. In what year does this book begin?
    2. Who does Ailin run into in the restaurant at the beginning of the story? How do they know each other?
    3. What does Ailin’s husband do for a living?


    Chapter One
    4. Describe the house the Taos live in.
    5. How did Ailin feel about her amah?
    6. Why was Ailin’s presence requested by her Grandmother?
    7. What was Mrs. Liu’s biggest concern with Ailin?
    8. Describe Hanwei.
    9. Describe the public school Hanwei attended.


    Chapter Two
    10. What reasons does Ailin’s mother give for binding her feet?
    11. How does Second Sister try to prepare Ailin for foot binding?
    12. Describe Big Uncle.
    13. What doe Big Uncle and Father disagree on?
    14. Describe Second Sister’s feet as she removes the cloth as Ailin watches.

    Chapter Three
    15. What is Ailin’s favorite part of her home schooling?
    16. How does Ailin get out of having her feet bound?
    17. Why was Second Sister punished?
    18. What does Ailin’s mother mean when she says, “My poor little girl, you’re beautiful, and you’re clever. But you are too headstrong. Someday you will have to pay a price for that.”
    19. How is Grandmother different toward Ailin when she is summoned once again? What effect does this have on Ailin?
    20. How did Ailin get out of binding her feet this time? What were the immediate consequences for this?


    Chapter Four
    21. What announcement does Father make about Ailin? How do the other family members respond?
    22. What must Ailin do before she is accepted into the school?
    23. Why was Ailin so happy at the MacIntosh school?
    24. Who is Xueyan? What is she like?
    25. What is Ailin’s best subject?
    26. Explain the importance of the following quote: “I personally like the colored cocoons,” said Second Sister, “but the silk weavers hate them because they spoil the uniformity. Whenever they see a colored one, they immediately take it out and burn it. Remember this.”
    Chapter Five
    27. What happened to Grandmother?
    28. What does Mrs. Liu say to Ailin at the funeral?
    29. What is wrong with Father?
    30. What is Ailin’s name at school?
    31. Who does Ailin run into on the way home one day?
    32. Describe Ailin and Xueyan’s conversation about foot binding.


    Chapter Six
    33. What warning does Second Sister give Ailin?
    34. What affect does Father’s death have on Ailin?
    35. Do you think that Big Uncle is more harsh toward Ailin now that Father is dead? Why or why not?
    36. What does Ms. Gilbertson offer to do in order to help Ailin?
    Chapter Seven
    37. What are the three options Big Uncle gives Ailin for her future?
    38. Why does Ailin feel that her life would not be better had she bound her feet?
    39. How does Ms. Gilbertson help Ailin?
    Chapter Eight
    40. What was Big Uncle’s reaction to the news that Ailin would be leaving?

    41. How does the Warner’s house boy treat Ailin initially?
    42. What were Ailin’s responsibilities at the Warners?
    43. What challenges did Ailin face at the Warners?
    44. Why was Ailin criticized by Mr. Warner?

    Chapter Nine
    45. How did Mr. and Mrs. Warner prove that they trusted her?
    46. What happened to Billy? How did Ailin try to solve the problem?
    47. How has the house boy’s opinion of Ailin changed?
    48. What did Mr. Warner ask Ailin to do?
    49. What were Ailin’s family members reactions to her news?
    Chapter Ten
    50. Who came to see Ailin off? What did she give Ailin?
    51. Who is James Chew and how did Ailin meet him?
    52. Why does James not want to work for his brother?
    Chapter Eleven
    53. How was life in San Francisco different for the Warners than life in China?
    54. How does Ailin take over the cooking for the Warners?
    55. Who does Ailin run into in Chinatown? What does she inspire him to do?
    56. Why does Ailin stay in America?
    Epilogue
    57. Why did Hanwei say Ailin should have waited for him? Do you agree or disagree?

    Name__________________________________________ Class____________________ Date______________

    Directions: Complete the chart for each quote. Use complete sentences in the boxes.


    Quote
    Why it’s Important to the Text My Reaction


    "I personally like the colored cocoons, but silk weavers hate them because they spoil the white uniformity. Whenever they see a colored one, they immediately take it out and burn it. Remember this."




    “At school I was Eileen, speaking English and learning about galaxies and far away countries. at home I was Ailin, a naughty girl whose engagement had been broken.”



    “Eileen, you’re the best student I’ve ever had in my English class. You have a very good ear, and your pronunciation is almost perfect. All you need is a bigger vocabulary. I know you won’t be able to return to school nest year, but I am willing to give you free tutoring at my home. I can’t bear to see this talent for languages being wasted.”




    “I’ve decided to go and work as an amah for an American missionary family,” I announced baldly. “I will be living with them from now on.”





    Ties that Bind, Ties that Break

    Directions: for each of the following questions choose the best answer. Bubble the answer you choose in on your answer form. DO NOT WRITE ON THIS TEST.



    1. In what decade does this book mostly take place?
    a. 1910s
    b. 1920s
    c. 1930s
    d. 1940s

    2. Who does Ailin run into in the restaurant at the beginning of the story?
    a. Hanwei
    b. Xueyan
    c. Second Sister
    d. Big Uncle

    3. What does Ailin’s husband do for a living?
    a. Doctor
    b. Store Manager
    c. Chef
    d. Restaurant Owner

    4. What was Mrs. Liu’s biggest concern with Ailin?
    a. Her untidy hair
    b. Her aggressive manner
    c. Her unbound feet
    d. Her shy attitude

    5. How does Second Sister try to prepare Ailin for foot binding?
    a. She shows Ailin her own bound feet
    b. She tells Ailin all of the steps in the process
    c. She complains about the pain of having bound feet
    d. She tells Ailin she doesn’t have a choice

    6. Big Uncle is best described as:
    a. Firm but kind leader
    b. Aggressive and intimating
    c. Generous and supportive
    d. Weak and nervous

    7. What do Big Uncle and Father disagree on?
    a. Who Ailin should marry
    b. China’s future
    c. How the Tao household should be run
    d. Whether they should hire a new tutor for their children

    8. Which character does Ailin most closely relate to?
    a. Mother
    b. Amah
    c. Big Uncle
    d. Father

    9. What is Ailin’s favorite part of her home schooling?
    a. Reading
    b. Math
    c. Brush writing
    d. Being with her cousins

    10. How did Ailin get out of binding her feet?
    a. Her grandmother came to her rescue
    b. Her sister convinced her mother it was wrong
    c. Her Father and Big Uncle decided that times were changing
    d. Ailin broke free from the maids and ran away

    11. Which of the following was ultimately not a negative consequence for having unbound feet?
    a. Being teased at school
    b. Loosing the respect of her family
    c. Having to work outside of the home
    d. The cancelation of engagement to Hanwei

    12. How do Ailin’s family members respond to Father’s announcement that Ailin would be attending public school?
    a. Happy and supportive
    b. Angry and bitter
    c. Jealous
    d. Concerned

    13. Why was Ailin so happy at the McIntosh school?
    a. She loved learning
    b. Highly respected for her English ability
    c. Easier than being home
    d. All of the above

    14. Which of the following best describes Xueyan?
    a. Friendly and shares Ailin’s beliefs
    b. Stubborn and unlikable
    c. Trouble maker
    d. Courageous and adventurous

    15. Which of the following best explains the importance of the following quote:
    “I personally like the colored cocoons,” said Second Sister, “but the silk weavers hate them becasue they spoil the uniformity. Whenever they see a colored one, they immediately take it out and burn it. Remember this.”
    a. The Taos rely on the silkworms for income
    b. Silk worms are an important part of the lives of all Chinese
    c. This statement is a metaphor Second Sister uses to warn Ailin
    d. Second Sister enjoys talking with Ailin and their discussion included the opinions of bother characters about the silkworms

    16. What does Mrs. Liu say to Ailin at her grandmother’s funeral?
    a. She’s glad she broke off the engagement
    b. She and Hanwei would never have gotten along
    c. It was very difficult to break off the engagement
    d. Ailin will suffer many more consequences because of her stubborn behavior

    17. What is Ailin’s name at school?
    a. Miss Tao
    b. Ellen
    c. Eileen
    d. Alana

    18. What affect does Father’s death have on Ailin?
    a. Ailin’s life is now completely hopeless
    b. Everyone at home now ignores her
    c. She is forced to stay locked in her room and stay out of Big Uncle’s way
    d. Big Uncle now tries harder to control Ailin and her life

    19. What does Ms. Gilbertson offer to do to help Ailin?
    a. Tutor Ailin
    b. Get Ailin a job
    c. Let Ailin live with her
    d. Sneak Ailin into the school and pay her tuition

    20. Which was not one of the options Big Uncle gave Ailin for her future?
    a. Marry a farmer
    b. Move to America
    c. Become a nun
    d. Become a concubine

    21. Which is not part of Ailin’s responsibilities at the Warners?
    a. Doing dishes
    b. Taking care of the children
    c. Teaching the children
    d. Telling the children stories

    22. Why was Ailin criticized by Mr. Warner?
    a. Telling dangerous folktales
    b. Ignoring her duties
    c. Not seeing her familly
    d. Teaching the children brush writing

    23. What did Mr. Warner ask Ailin to do?
    a. Take on more teaching responsibility
    b. Go to America with them
    c. To go visit her family
    d. Become a missionary

    24. Who came to see Ailin off? What did she give Ailin?
    a. Hanwei and a letter from her mother
    b. Big Uncle and some money
    c. Xueyan and the money Ailin left with Big Uncle
    d. Her mother and a locket

    25. How was life in San Francisco different for the Warners?
    a. They were much wealthier than they were in China
    b. They were expected to work much harder in the states
    c. They could no longer afford the luxuries they had in China
    d. They were not respected in their American society because they were missionaries

    26. Why does Ailin stay in America?
    a. To marry Hanwei
    b. To go to college
    c. To marry James Chew
    d. To work for another family



    Essay: Answer the following questions using essay format- complete sentences, proper grammar, paragraphs, and supporting evidence from the text.

    27. Explain how the setting has influenced the plot of the story. How would Ailin’s experiences have been different in a different time or place? Use details from the novel to support your beliefs.



    28. Determine if Ailin made the right decision to not have her feet bound. Consider both the positive and negative consequences this had on her life. Use details from the story to support your answer.
    1/19/2017 8:41:27 PM
    Topic:
    Ip Man 2

    cmorgan
    cmorgan
    Posts: 63
    Ip man 2 is an amazing movie filled with lots of martial arts and action. Last semester I submitted a review of Ip Man 1. In this movie he was fighting the Japanese during the war. He helped overtake them and gain back China. In Ip Man 2 the big showdown is between China and the British which had occupied Hong Kong. It is set in 1949. The “bad guy” in this is representing the British with a boxer called “The Twister”. The boxer represents the British force. The fighting of Ip Man was of the Wing Chun School. The boxer of course uses only his hands, however Ip Man uses feet, hands and martial arts moves. At one point during the fight however the referee does not allow any kicking. Of course this favors the boxer. Ip Man is still a family man with a second child on the way in this story. Another cool thing is Bruce Lee coming in at the end of the movie at the age of 5. Great movie to show in a history class when you are teaching about British rule in Hong Kong.

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