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7/19/2017 8:35:39 PM
Topic:
human rights in the curriculum

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1921
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo passed away last week. Below are some questions and resources that might be useful in teaching about Liu, his decades devoted to promoting democracy in China, and how the Chinese state responded to those efforts.

Possible organizing questions:

1. What did Liu Xiaobo advocate as a cultural critic and as a political activist?
2. What did Liu Xiaobo do to make his views heard and to mobilize others to his side?
3. What laws did the Chinese state decide Liu Xiaobo had violated? How did it punish those violations?
4. At the time of his last conviction, Liu argued he was merely using every Chinese citizen’s right to free speech. What rights does the Chinese constitution promise it citizens?
5. Liu Xiaobo was detained for the last time in December 2008. He was convicted in 2009. They next year he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. Liu remained in jail and his essays supporting democracy are easily circulated within China today. Still, the Chinese state sought to limit discussion about his passing on social media. His incarceration and his passing, however, were widely noted outside of China. What do you think the case of Liu Xiaobo teaches?

Possible readings:

Obituaries
Clayton Dube, Liu Xiaobo, 1955-2017, July 13, 2017
Obituaries
Clayton Dube, Liu Xiaobo, 1955-2017, July 13, 2017
http://www.china.usc.edu/liu-xiaobo-1955-2017
(includes links to his writings, to the 2009 court verdict against him, to the 2010 Nobel decision and the award speeches)
Chris Buckley, “Liu Xiaobo, Chinese Dissident Who Won Nobel While Jailed, Dies at 61,” New York Times, July 13, 2017.
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/13/world/asia/liu-xiaobo-dead.html
Remembrance
Perry Link, “The Passion of Liu Xiaobo,” New York Review of Books, July 13, 2017.
http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2017/07/13/the-passion-of-liu-xiaobo/
Criticism
Barry Sautman and Yan Hairong, “Do supporters of Nobel winner Liu Xiaobo really know what he stands for?” The Guardian, December 15, 2010.
https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/dec/15/nobel-winner-liu-xiaobo-chinese-dissident
and a longer piece in Positions, (2011)19:2, 581-613.
http://positions.dukejournals.org/content/19/2/581.full.pdf+html
“Who is Liu Xiaobo?” China Daily, October 27, 2010.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2010-10/27/content_11465957.htm
Xinhua, “Some foreign media misunderstand Liu Xiaobo’s case: criminal law expert,” PRC Embassy in Washington, November 5, 2010.
http://www.china-embassy.org/eng/gdxw/t766972.htm
Coverage of how his death was handled
Jonathan Kaiman, “Chinese Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo's death sparked an outpouring of grief online. Then came the censors,” July, 14, 2017.
http://www.latimes.com/world/asia/la-fg-china-liu-xiaobo-censors-20170714-story.html
Associated Press, “How Beijing controls the Liu Xiaobo story,” July 13, 2017.

https://yp.scmp.com/news/international/article/106769/how-beijing-controls-liu-xiaobo-story
Supplementary materials
Chinese constitution
http://china.usc.edu/constitution-peoples-republic-china-1982
Dualing human rights reports

US looking at China
http://china.usc.edu/us-department-state-2015-human-rights-china-april-13-2016
China looking at the US
http://china.usc.edu/prc-state-council-human-rights-record-united-states-2015-april-14-2016
7/15/2017 11:04:32 PM
Topic:
T'ang Poems with Art

jshen
jshen
Posts: 35
Thank you so much for your lesson plan. I will modify it for my high school Mandarin classroom. I will have my students to read some poems in both Chinese and English and according to their understanding, draw a picture following the Chinese painting rules.
You inspired me so much.
7/15/2017 10:56:39 PM
Topic:
Chinese Inventions Yesterday, Today, & in the Futu

jshen
jshen
Posts: 35
Thanks you so much for your resources posted here. I would definitely quote some from your posting. For example, the 20 inventions. It will be really useful for my high school students to know that besides the top 4 ancient inventions, Chinese also invented the tooth brush, the kites, the paper money and many others as well.
6/25/2017 10:07:40 PM
Topic:
T'ang Poems with Art

ctsichlis
ctsichlis
Posts: 60
This was a great lesson idea/plan. I may try to modify it for 9th Graders. Thanks!
6/25/2017 9:56:40 PM
Topic:
Economics: Great Leap Forward vs. SEZs

ctsichlis
ctsichlis
Posts: 60
I just wanted to thank you for this lesson. It was fascinating and I think it is a great assignment.
6/25/2017 9:49:15 PM
Topic:
Confucius

Lin ZD
Lin ZD
Posts: 38
Thanks for posting. I'm looking for a film about confucianism for education purpose. I'll see the movie.
6/25/2017 3:24:49 PM
Topic:
Film Review of Kung Fu Hustle

Lin ZD
Lin ZD
Posts: 38
I agree. Students would have lots of fun watching this movie and enjoy learning Chinese cultures and traditions from it.
6/25/2017 2:59:25 PM
Topic:
T'ang Poems with Art

elizabethr
elizabethr
Posts: 76
See attached lesson
6/25/2017 2:17:06 PM
Topic:
Review of Mulan, a Disney movie

Lin ZD
Lin ZD
Posts: 38
Kung-Fu Panda is a good animated film to entertain young students. They could certainly get to know some Asian and Chinese traditions from it, such as family values and martial arts.
6/24/2017 10:48:27 PM
Topic:
Chinese Inventions Yesterday, Today, & in the Futu

ctsichlis
ctsichlis
Posts: 60
The goal of this lesson plan is to meet 7th grade CA History standards concerning China's contributions to the world. In short, this lesson has students investigate Ancient Chinese inventions and create a poster in which they show what this invention was in Ancient China, what it looks like today, and what it will look like in the future. They have the opportunity to become inventors and tap into the creative process.

Below are all the components. The Chinese Inventions PDF, which lists 20 inventions and has text next to them was taken from:
https://www.davis.k12.ut.us/cms/lib09/UT01001306/Centricity/Domain/329/Chinese%20Inventions%20Article.pdf

Hope you enjoy!
edited by ctsichlis on 6/24/2017
6/23/2017 11:34:29 PM
Topic:
Film Review: Beginning of the Great Revival

ctsichlis
ctsichlis
Posts: 60
I was hoping to watch Confucius on Netflix, however, it wasn't there. Suggested to me was the film, Beginning of the Great Revival. The film was created to celebrate the founding of the Communist Party and covers the development of the party for 10 years, from 1911 to 1921. Theoretically, a film on the development of the Communist party would be great for students--it simplifies the History, shows the major characters, and gives a solid visual. However, there are several issues that must be solved before students could watch this film.

1. It is clearly a propaganda film. So blatantly at times that it is hard to imagine it even works as propaganda. There is a "yeah right" feeling that you get as you watch the film and even I could predict what the characters will say or do. Any viewing of this film should come with counter-views or correctives.


2. The film is impossible to understand without some background. I stopped and Googled almost every character that appeared--and it is in the dozens--as well as some scenes. Most of the characters explicitly named have only a few minutes here or there on the screen before the historical events push on and they are forgotten. This works fine when they are people and stories that everybody in China knows, but unfortunately, it won't be for students.


Despite these caveats, I still think this would be a good film to show, particularly in a History through Film class. I would give a lecture, using the film to guide my lecture and knowing that students would see the film after the lecture. In this way students would be given the background needed. Furthermore, I would have questions during the film about various events and the motives of individuals in the film. Then after the film, I might give students alternative historical interpretations and we can have a discussion of historical motivations.


I really think that this film, with scaffolding, is an excellent way for students to get an "inside" look at the Chinese Communist Revolution, that counters American views. Moreover, I think after the lecture, the film will help the events sink into their memories.
6/23/2017 10:43:04 PM
Topic:
Film Review of Ip Man

cgarcia
cgarcia
Posts: 30
The film I watched for this assignment was Ip Man. The film focuses on the life of Ip Man and his family during the late 1930s. Ip Man and his family were highly respected in his community of Fo Shan, China. It was obvious too that his family was well off compared to those in his community, despite this the people respect him because he is portrayed to be honorable. This soon changes once Japan takes over Fo Shan, and Ip Man and his family are forced to leave their home and their belongings behind. Due to his abilities as a Wing Chung Kung Fu master, he quickly gains the attention of the Japanese.
I would use this film with my 10th grade class or 11th grade class as we cover World War II. We could look at clips of this film as we explore the reasons for Japan’s aggression before and after World War II; ideology, racism, domestic politics and economic background. The story of Ip Man would captivate the attention of my students.
6/23/2017 4:13:07 PM
Topic:
World Lit Lesson Plan: Classical Japan

bmitchell
bmitchell
Posts: 32
This is really great. You cover a lot of time in a few lessons! One thing I think you may find useful during the samurai lesson is this neat tale I found about the Samurai and the Tea Master. There are many versions but this one is pretty short and to the point. I've attached it. It's from a larger group of lessons here.

http://asia.isp.msu.edu/files/8214/6220/7255/japanculture.pdf

Enjoy!
6/23/2017 4:01:27 PM
Topic:
Curriculum Project - the Heian period

bmitchell
bmitchell
Posts: 32
Oh man, so much good material out there for lesson plans!

Here's mine, if anyone's interested!
6/23/2017 3:50:17 PM
Topic:
Review of Mulan, a Disney movie

ssaeed
ssaeed
Posts: 31
just curious, do you guys recommend any other movies that would be good for younger students (1st grade). I was thinking Kung-Fu panda... Although I haven't seen it yet, it seems high interest, its popular, and I'm sure students can learn many things about ancient China from it.
6/23/2017 2:19:28 PM
Topic:
Review of Mulan, a Disney movie

Lin ZD
Lin ZD
Posts: 38
Thank you!
6/23/2017 1:52:47 PM
Topic:
CONFUCIUS (2010) 2 hr MOVIE REVIEW

kjones
kjones
Posts: 36
I teach Middle School, 6th grade English/History-Ancient Civilizations/ELD in an inner city low economic neighborhood. It has been challenging to teach children to respect the cultures that are different from their own. However, in this past year experience I have found that teaching history from a biographical and invention/art perspective to be the most succesful and engaging for my students.

I chose this film because I think it is a great way to culminate a unit on Confucius and Ancient China. It would be a great incentive to inform the students that as they finish all their learning on Ancient China that they will have the opportunity to enjoy an authentic but recent film on Confucius.The film would be shown over a week's time. Students would take cornell notes as they watch the movie.Students would also identify the G.R.A.P.E.S.-Geography, Religion, Accomplishments, Economy, and Social Structures found within the movie. I would create a GRAPES handout so that they could identify the different components with specific examples from the movie. Students would discuss the movie in a group discussion as well as socratic seminar. Questions would be teacher and student generated.

Students would have great success because the movie viewing would be a review of what they have learned about Confucius and Ancient China. They will experience a sense of accomplishment and understanding as they easily apply the concepts to the Ancient China Civilization. This movie will bring even more clarity, experience, understanding and enrichment as they watch the acient culture come alive through film. The best thing is the movie can be viewed on youtube for free. Additionally, the movie opens with a boy in the students' age group escaping an ancient ritual of a slave burial which will be highly engaging for students to relate to.
6/23/2017 1:45:08 PM
Topic:
Review of Mulan, a Disney movie

ssaeed
ssaeed
Posts: 31
I teach first grade and I think Mulan would be a great choice to show students the history and culture of China. I would add this to my curriculum project of an introduction lesson for East Asia. Your questions are spot on for raising discussion with young students.
6/23/2017 1:38:16 PM
Topic:
Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower (Netflix)

ssaeed
ssaeed
Posts: 31
Joshua: Teenager vs. Superpower (Netflix Documentary)
This documentary is about the young citizens of Hong Kong protesting to defend their autonomy from China. These protests are lead by a young teenager activist named Joshua Wong, who started the student movement called “Scholarism” when he was 14 years old. He fights for democracy, demanding freedom of mind and freedom of speech. The people protest “National Education” which would require students to develop emotional attachment to China and promote nationalism. They believe it would be the next step in communist China to take over Hong Kong.
The most interesting thing about this is the fact that Hong Kong was under British rule up to 1997, when it was handed back to communist China. This documentary was an eye opener and very inspirational to see young students, especially Joshua, the young leader, paving the way for democracy, and encouraging people of Hong Kong to stand up for what they believe in.
This would be more appropriate for older students- for teenagers to see what they can accomplish and produce change!
edited by ssaeed on 6/23/2017
edited by ssaeed on 6/23/2017
6/23/2017 11:59:07 AM
Topic:
Japanese Festival

scoffey
scoffey
Posts: 46
This sounds amazing! What are some of the games that the students play?

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