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1/23/2017 12:49:44 AM
Topic:
Modern China Assessments in SHEG format

ctsichlis
ctsichlis
Posts: 30
The following are two assessments that use Modern Chinese History content as opposed the the US content used by the Standford Reading Like a Historian site.

Portrait of Mao
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1n0dssYIe-_dYe-Q8kDZtPdGzpUUjRNXwjNRUJXvOvQE/edit?usp=sharing

Battle of Langfang
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1G8mglGNl6afR7DA126GNufaPWTzwZTA6gxL2oLoEu6I/edit?usp=sharing
1/23/2017 12:09:34 AM
Topic:
Art Imitates Life

ngilliam
ngilliam
Posts: 77
Attached, please find a copy of the unit.

Thank you for a wonderful experience!
1/22/2017 8:46:36 PM
Topic:
Film Review - "The Gate of Heavenly Peace"

ngilliam
ngilliam
Posts: 77
Ironically, the film, documentary really, is called "The Gate of Heavenly Peace", and it is anything but that. A[font=Roboto, arial, sans-serif] 1995 documentary film, produced by Richard Gordon and Carma Hinton, the documentary f[/font]ocuses on student led protests, particularly, the Protests in early June, 1989, the film has a tendency to be a little graphic. Documenting Tiananamen Square as the center of student protests, beginning with the May 4th Movement of 1919, the Square, once a field with waist high weeds, has come to be the center of student-led protests.

There are interviews, actual footage from the days leading up to June 5, and the infamous footage of "Tank Man" himself. There is also, however, footage of wounded students - blood, bandages, and all. Because the documentary is about 3 hours long (yikes!) I definitely would not try to sit and watch the entire thing in one sitting, partly because some of what seem to be the most important parts, interviews and the like, are not translated, making it very difficult to fit together the pieces of the puzzle.

One suggestion, because there is so much in the documentary that teachers can focus on, would be to only show selected parts, and show those parts as they relate to various literary works. The book Animal Farm comes to mind when the film discusses how Chairman Mao came to power. The very thing that he strived to fight against, was what he became. Some referred to him as being emperor- or god-like. In addition, Teachers could also juxtapose these student led protests to those in the United States during the Civil Rights Movement and the Freedom Rides, or even the protests regarding the Vietnam War.

There are several versions of the film available on YouTube, however the one with the most translated into English has been divided into two different parts. The links are as follows:
Part 1 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Gtt2JxmQtg
Part 2 - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o0lgc4fWkWI
1/22/2017 7:07:21 PM
Topic:
Economics: Great Leap Forward vs. SEZs

jdoll
jdoll
Posts: 35
Economics Lesson:
China’s Great Leap Forward vs. Special Economic Zones

Objectives: Students will study the differences between communism and capitalism through an examination of two famous and very different attempts at economic modernization in China. The focus of the lesson is a contrast between the Great Leap Forward and Special Economic Zones (SEZs).

CALIFORNIA ECONOMIC CONTENT STANDARDS:
12.1 Students understand common economic terms and concepts and economic reasoning.
12.2 Students analyze the elements of America’s market economy in a global setting.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY
RH.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
RH.11-12.9 Integrate information from diverse sources, both primary and secondary, into a coherent understanding of an idea or event, noting discrepancies among sources.

Continuum: This lesson will fall between a lesson contrasting Command and Market economies, and a lesson on mixed economies.

· This lesson will take 3-4 class periods depending on level of students.

Day 1: Great Leap Forward
· Students will watch video: Great Leap Forward Summary (6 min)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlbB3cmgPmo
· Students will close read “China's Great Famine: the true story,” answering 3 sets of questions on each consecutive read.
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/jan/01/china-great-famine-book-tombstone

Close Read Questions #1
1. Who is Yang Jisheng?
2. What year did the Communists take power in China?
3. What was the officials’ response to the head of the production brigade?
4. How many people does Yang believe died in the famine?
5. What is the name of Yang’s book?
Close Read Questions #2
1. Why did Yang feel the deaths were personal tragedies and not the fault of the government when he was 18?
2. How did Yang get access to official records to write his book?
3. How does the Communist party view the famine?
4. What is the official death toll of the famine?
5. What role did Mao play in the famine according to Yang?
Close Read Questions #3
1. Describe the famine that resulted from the Great Leap Forward, use details from the article.
2. Why do you think the Communist Party still refuses to take responsibility in the famine?
3. What makes Yang’s book so important to China and the rest of the world?
4. How was the Great Leap Forward possible in a command economy?

Day 2-3: Special Economic Zones (SEZs)
· Students will watch video: Special Economic Zones in China (2 min)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ND_Y4hfkesA
· Students will watch video: Econ 1.6- Economic Systems: Why is Communist China doing so well? (4 min)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KPpmAUk1olA
· Students will read “The Development of China’s Special Economic Zones,” answering 3 sets of questions on each consecutive read.
http://internshipschina.com/development-chinas-special-economic-zones/

Close Read Questions #1
1. What is a SEZ?
2. What is a Free Trade Zone (FTZ)?
3. What are Economic and Technological Development Zones (ETDZs)?
4. How do SEZs attract foreign investment?
Close Read Questions #2
1. What city will be the trial for FTZs?
2. How have SEZs opened China to ideas inherent with capitalism and the relaxation of government economic controls?
3. What kind of incentives are SEZs given in China?
Close Read Questions #3
1. How have SEZs acted as windows to foreign investment in China?
2. Describe how SEZs have acted as “radiators” to accelerated inland economic development?
3. Does the development of SEZs and FTZs mean China is no longer Communist? Explain?
Jigsaw activity: Students will get into groups and research one of the following SEZs: Shantou, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Xiamen, Dalian, Qinhuangdao, Tianjin, Yantai, Qingdao, Lianyungang, Nantong, Shanghai, Ningbo, Wenzhou, Fuzhou, Guangzhou, Zhanjiang, and Beihai.
Groups will become “experts on their SEZ and present their findings to the rest of the class. Information must include:
· Location on map of China
· Type of industries promoted
· Incentives given to foreign investors
· Effect of SEZ on local economy
Day 4: Assessment
Students will write a short essay with the following prompt: How did the Great Leap Forward affect economic policy in China?
1/22/2017 2:22:02 PM
Topic:
Film Review: China Blue (2005)

ctsichlis
ctsichlis
Posts: 30
Although it turned out to be a little older than I thought, I strongly recommend this film because I think it is very relatable and brings up a number of issues--ethics, economics, government responsibility, labor practices, globalization, etc.

China Blue is an independent film that masterfully shows how the global economy impacts individuals. Filmed without the approval of Chinese authorities, it follows a young girl who migrates from a countryside village where she takes a job at a blue jean factory. It films not only the lives of the workers, but also the pressure on the factory owner, and his deals with a variety of international buyers. It is a deeply fascinating film that puts a human face to globalization.

For students, it is a great way to view the other side of the economy that they participate in. After seeing this, I decided I would like to to use it for my Geography class and pair it with a discussion of ethics, the guiding question: Are we participating in unethical behavior when we buy outsourced materials? To help students, it would be good to front load them with some statistical facts about globalization and US-China trade relations. Also, I would like to create a viewers guide, that has questions to help students pay attention to certain actions as the watch the film. The ultimate goal would be an informed discussion, not only about the film, but their choices in the economy and its ethical implications, if any.




Movie Webpage
http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/chinablue/

Ethics & Economics Lesson Plan
http://www.pbs.org/pov/lasttrainhome/lesson-plan-1/

Study Guide by Eli D. Friedman at UC Berkeley
http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/guides/chinaguide.pdf
1/22/2017 10:59:08 AM
Topic:
Film Review - To Live

rcharles
rcharles
Posts: 35
Students will research and develop an understanding of the human experience in a culture that is in some ways the mirror opposite of their own. In a time in which capitalism in China bodes the same reaction socialists did in America, students will investigate the role of the government and how much control it should have on the lives of its citizens. Exploring a culture through the arts makes accessible qualities that cannot be quantified in the black and white texts of historical fact telling. The Film To Live was window into a world that is the mirror opposite of Western Culture at the time. It helps to not just understand the what but the why, the subjective and the visceral. This film is a great way for students to travel through the milestones that we will discuss in class such as The Great Leap Forward and The Cultural Revolution or even to look at ways being labeled a “capitalist” impacted citizens much in the same way being labeled a “communist” destroyed lives here in the U.S. The film really makes the hardships of The Cultural Revolution accessible to students who would otherwise not have a point of reference. Students will compare and contrast Zhang Yimou’s work in To Live to that in House of the Flying Daggers. These films are so visually different I think that its not only a testament to how he’s evolving as a filmmaker, but also how he is being shaped as a storyteller evolving as an artist within the confines of Chinese Censorship. We will also discuss media representations with discussion about the lead character Fugui (Ge You) who is not featured on the movie poster, but is replaced by his wife Jiazhen (Gong Li) who was also banned from making films as a result of her role in this film.
edited by rcharles on 1/22/2017
1/21/2017 11:07:23 PM
Topic:
Documentary Filmmaking - Video 1 - Asia

rcharles
rcharles
Posts: 35
VIDEO PRODUCTION 2 – DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING

Rationale: Students will broaden their social and cultural awareness by exploring media depictions, representations and identity. Students will identify how the professional elements of documentary filmmaking are used to create effective non-fiction human experiences by viewing a series of documentaries and journalistic programs centered around Asian culture over the course of two weeks. This unit is will be integral in helping students understand the differences between sympathy and empathy and how understanding that difference will allow students to effectively value the inclusion of the human experience (increasing the quality of the film) equally important to the quantifiable data and evidence necessary to complete the project.

Skill and Content Objectives [font=" lato="" light","serif"]CCSS.ELA-Literacy.rh.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.[/font]

POINT OF VIEW

Lesson 1 – Understanding the Role of Documentaries
Role #1 - CHALLENGE belief systems in order to CHANGE point of view. Students will explore how the filmmaker’s point of view can influence the audience’s point of view.

Pre Screening Exercise
Write two paragraphs (1) for and (2) against the existence the pursuit of money and power.
Students have to challenge their own biases on capitalism to provide an argument on both sides.

Watch Iron Moon [screened in class]
[Worksheet #1] - Describe how this documentary uses beliefs/values (on the subject of wealth) to challenge perception and change point of view?

Discussion
Evidence – Proof: what we hear and see as evidence.

Experts – Who are they? How do they influence the audience? Are they qualified? Who were not included?

Purpose – What is the goal of this documentary? What does it want to accomplish?

Appeal – How does the video appeal to your emotions? Logic? How was it visually appealing?

Target Audience – Who was the video made for? If you change the target audience, how would it change the video?

VALIDITY OF TESTIMONY - A

Lesson 2 – Testimony part 1

Evaluating the validity of testimony and the faultiness of memory.

Watch In Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan, director Megumi Nishikura [screened in class]

[Worksheet #2] Students evaluate the reliability of memory and critically analyzing the motivations of the interviewees.

Discussion
Evidence – Proof: what we hear and see as evidence.

Experts – Who are they? How do they influence the audience? Are they qualified? Who were not included?

Purpose – What is the goal of this documentary? What does it want to accomplish?


Target Audience – Who was the video made for? If you change the target audience, how would it change the video?

In the video, what may be some reasons the people chose to do the show.

In the video, the interviewers based their claims on their memory of the events and how they believed they experienced them. What’s wrong with relying on memory?

In the video, what forms of persuasion did the video use to convince you of the events?

VALIDITY OF TESTIMONY - B

Lesson 3 – Testimony part 2 (The Value of Memory/Testimony)

Evaluating the value of testimony and the impact of emotional memory. The differences between Sympathy and Empathy: sympathy is feeling compassion, sorrow, or pity for the hardships that another person encounters, while empathy is putting yourself in the shoes of another. Students will explore how documentaries activate empathy to appeal to audiences with reenactments, emotional testimonies through the function of memory.
[Worksheet #3, 4 & 5]

Students will write a paragraph detailing their 1st memory and discuss the challenges of the exercise.

Students will complete a roll play memory exercise reenacting the details of Rebecca Chan’s account [SEE ATTACHED] with the use of visuals and audio.

Students will read her actual account and compare and contrast the exercise to her memory. We will then discuss the value of her memory.

Discussion Part A will center around these questions:
Do you think Rebecca Chan’s memory is faulty? Why or why not?
Do you think your first memory is faulty? Why or why not?
What value does memory have in documentaries if memories can be faulty?
What value does your memory have to you and why might that be important to an audience?

Discussion Part B The differences between Sympathy and Empathy. Sympathy is feeling compassion, sorrow, or pity for the hardships that another person encounters, while empathy is putting yourself in the shoes of another.
How does testimony and memory create empathy?
Did you sympathize with Rebecca Chan or empathize with her, and why?
How does testimony and memory create empathy during emotional interviews?
How would it make you feel for people to question the integrity of your first memory, and why?
How does testimony and memory create empathy with re-enactments?


Evidence of Achievement
[font=Times]After forming groups, students will create a presentation pitch of their documentary topic to dissect the appeal (emotional vs. logical), type of experts and evidence that may be used, as well as the purpose (who is their target audience and what do they want the viewer to do/understand) before filming begins. 10 points extra credit will be award if students incorporate an Asian element into their topic and/or material presented in the documentary.[/font]
edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017
edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017
1/21/2017 10:00:33 PM
Topic:
Film Review

rcharles
rcharles
Posts: 35
Students will research and develop an understanding of the human experience in a culture that is the mirror opposite of their own. In a time in which capitalism in China bodes the same reaction socialists did in America, students will investigate the role of the government and how much control it should have on the lives of its citizens. Exploring a culture through the arts makes accessible qualities that cannot be quantified in the black and white texts of historical fact telling. The Film To Live was window into a world that is the mirror opposite of Western Culture. It helps to not just understand the what but the why, the subjective and the visceral. This film is a great way for students to travel through the milestones that we will discuss in class such as The Great Leap Forward and The Cultural Revolution or even to look at ways being labeled a “capitalist” impacted citizens much in the same way being labeled a “communist” destroyed lives here in the U.S. The film really makes the hardships of The Cultural Revolution accessible to students who would otherwise not have a point of reference. Students will compare and contrast Zhang Yimou’s work in To Live to that in House of the Flying Daggers. These films are so visually different I think that its not only a testament to how he’s evolving as a filmmaker, but also how he is being shaped as a storyteller evolving as an artist within the confines of Chinese Censorship. We will also discuss media representations with discussion about the lead character Fugui (Ge You) who is not featured on the movie poster, but is replaced by his wife Jiazhen (Gong Li) who was also banned from making films as a result of her role in this film.
edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017
1/19/2017 9:32:16 PM
Topic:
Ties that bind, Ties that break novel study

cmorgan
cmorgan
Posts: 63
I have chosen to submit a lesson plan for the novel Ties that Bind, Ties that break by Lensey Namioka. This novel explores the issue of foot binding.

Day One: Introduce what foot binding is by showing them pictures of women that have their feet bound. You can find them on Google under images on footbinding. I brought up images that were not super graphic, but conveyed the practice of foot binding. I also have a discussion about why they practiced footbinding and what it meant. The class distinction and the government at the time. Quick write for this day is : “ Would you be willing to give up opportunities to marry and lead a life like everyone else your age? Could you stand up for what you believed or wanted, even though everyone was against you?”

Day Two: Pass out study guides (see attached) and begin instructing the students as to how you want them filled out. Remind them that the test will be just like the study guide. Begin chapter one. You can choose to have them read or you can read. I like to play the novel on audiobook, and they have this book on Audible, Amazon’s sight. The lady reading it has a great voice and is easy to understand. I fill out the study guide with them after each chapter and discuss as we go. Quick Write: “ Why was footbinding first started and why do you think that more women didn’t protest the practice?”

Day three-? I continue on with the chapters reading and discussing and filling out the study guides.

Final days… I allow the students to work in groups to study and prepare for the test. I also take this opportunity for a rich discussion of the students feelings and thoughts on family influence, foot binding and any other topics they come up with. I also tie it back in with the original anchor unit of Conformity versus Individuality. I would then give the final test after study time. Attached are the study guide and test. They were not created by me but on teachers pay teachers by Angela Bihn.















Ties that Bind, Ties that Break Study Guide

Name________________________________ Date_____________________ Class_____________________

Prologue
1. In what year does this book begin?
2. Who does Ailin run into in the restaurant at the beginning of the story? How do they know each other?
3. What does Ailin’s husband do for a living?


Chapter One
4. Describe the house the Taos live in.
5. How did Ailin feel about her amah?
6. Why was Ailin’s presence requested by her Grandmother?
7. What was Mrs. Liu’s biggest concern with Ailin?
8. Describe Hanwei.
9. Describe the public school Hanwei attended.


Chapter Two
10. What reasons does Ailin’s mother give for binding her feet?
11. How does Second Sister try to prepare Ailin for foot binding?
12. Describe Big Uncle.
13. What doe Big Uncle and Father disagree on?
14. Describe Second Sister’s feet as she removes the cloth as Ailin watches.

Chapter Three
15. What is Ailin’s favorite part of her home schooling?
16. How does Ailin get out of having her feet bound?
17. Why was Second Sister punished?
18. What does Ailin’s mother mean when she says, “My poor little girl, you’re beautiful, and you’re clever. But you are too headstrong. Someday you will have to pay a price for that.”
19. How is Grandmother different toward Ailin when she is summoned once again? What effect does this have on Ailin?
20. How did Ailin get out of binding her feet this time? What were the immediate consequences for this?


Chapter Four
21. What announcement does Father make about Ailin? How do the other family members respond?
22. What must Ailin do before she is accepted into the school?
23. Why was Ailin so happy at the MacIntosh school?
24. Who is Xueyan? What is she like?
25. What is Ailin’s best subject?
26. Explain the importance of the following quote: “I personally like the colored cocoons,” said Second Sister, “but the silk weavers hate them because they spoil the uniformity. Whenever they see a colored one, they immediately take it out and burn it. Remember this.”
Chapter Five
27. What happened to Grandmother?
28. What does Mrs. Liu say to Ailin at the funeral?
29. What is wrong with Father?
30. What is Ailin’s name at school?
31. Who does Ailin run into on the way home one day?
32. Describe Ailin and Xueyan’s conversation about foot binding.


Chapter Six
33. What warning does Second Sister give Ailin?
34. What affect does Father’s death have on Ailin?
35. Do you think that Big Uncle is more harsh toward Ailin now that Father is dead? Why or why not?
36. What does Ms. Gilbertson offer to do in order to help Ailin?
Chapter Seven
37. What are the three options Big Uncle gives Ailin for her future?
38. Why does Ailin feel that her life would not be better had she bound her feet?
39. How does Ms. Gilbertson help Ailin?
Chapter Eight
40. What was Big Uncle’s reaction to the news that Ailin would be leaving?

41. How does the Warner’s house boy treat Ailin initially?
42. What were Ailin’s responsibilities at the Warners?
43. What challenges did Ailin face at the Warners?
44. Why was Ailin criticized by Mr. Warner?

Chapter Nine
45. How did Mr. and Mrs. Warner prove that they trusted her?
46. What happened to Billy? How did Ailin try to solve the problem?
47. How has the house boy’s opinion of Ailin changed?
48. What did Mr. Warner ask Ailin to do?
49. What were Ailin’s family members reactions to her news?
Chapter Ten
50. Who came to see Ailin off? What did she give Ailin?
51. Who is James Chew and how did Ailin meet him?
52. Why does James not want to work for his brother?
Chapter Eleven
53. How was life in San Francisco different for the Warners than life in China?
54. How does Ailin take over the cooking for the Warners?
55. Who does Ailin run into in Chinatown? What does she inspire him to do?
56. Why does Ailin stay in America?
Epilogue
57. Why did Hanwei say Ailin should have waited for him? Do you agree or disagree?

Name__________________________________________ Class____________________ Date______________

Directions: Complete the chart for each quote. Use complete sentences in the boxes.


Quote
Why it’s Important to the Text My Reaction


"I personally like the colored cocoons, but silk weavers hate them because they spoil the white uniformity. Whenever they see a colored one, they immediately take it out and burn it. Remember this."




“At school I was Eileen, speaking English and learning about galaxies and far away countries. at home I was Ailin, a naughty girl whose engagement had been broken.”



“Eileen, you’re the best student I’ve ever had in my English class. You have a very good ear, and your pronunciation is almost perfect. All you need is a bigger vocabulary. I know you won’t be able to return to school nest year, but I am willing to give you free tutoring at my home. I can’t bear to see this talent for languages being wasted.”




“I’ve decided to go and work as an amah for an American missionary family,” I announced baldly. “I will be living with them from now on.”





Ties that Bind, Ties that Break

Directions: for each of the following questions choose the best answer. Bubble the answer you choose in on your answer form. DO NOT WRITE ON THIS TEST.



1. In what decade does this book mostly take place?
a. 1910s
b. 1920s
c. 1930s
d. 1940s

2. Who does Ailin run into in the restaurant at the beginning of the story?
a. Hanwei
b. Xueyan
c. Second Sister
d. Big Uncle

3. What does Ailin’s husband do for a living?
a. Doctor
b. Store Manager
c. Chef
d. Restaurant Owner

4. What was Mrs. Liu’s biggest concern with Ailin?
a. Her untidy hair
b. Her aggressive manner
c. Her unbound feet
d. Her shy attitude

5. How does Second Sister try to prepare Ailin for foot binding?
a. She shows Ailin her own bound feet
b. She tells Ailin all of the steps in the process
c. She complains about the pain of having bound feet
d. She tells Ailin she doesn’t have a choice

6. Big Uncle is best described as:
a. Firm but kind leader
b. Aggressive and intimating
c. Generous and supportive
d. Weak and nervous

7. What do Big Uncle and Father disagree on?
a. Who Ailin should marry
b. China’s future
c. How the Tao household should be run
d. Whether they should hire a new tutor for their children

8. Which character does Ailin most closely relate to?
a. Mother
b. Amah
c. Big Uncle
d. Father

9. What is Ailin’s favorite part of her home schooling?
a. Reading
b. Math
c. Brush writing
d. Being with her cousins

10. How did Ailin get out of binding her feet?
a. Her grandmother came to her rescue
b. Her sister convinced her mother it was wrong
c. Her Father and Big Uncle decided that times were changing
d. Ailin broke free from the maids and ran away

11. Which of the following was ultimately not a negative consequence for having unbound feet?
a. Being teased at school
b. Loosing the respect of her family
c. Having to work outside of the home
d. The cancelation of engagement to Hanwei

12. How do Ailin’s family members respond to Father’s announcement that Ailin would be attending public school?
a. Happy and supportive
b. Angry and bitter
c. Jealous
d. Concerned

13. Why was Ailin so happy at the McIntosh school?
a. She loved learning
b. Highly respected for her English ability
c. Easier than being home
d. All of the above

14. Which of the following best describes Xueyan?
a. Friendly and shares Ailin’s beliefs
b. Stubborn and unlikable
c. Trouble maker
d. Courageous and adventurous

15. Which of the following best explains the importance of the following quote:
“I personally like the colored cocoons,” said Second Sister, “but the silk weavers hate them becasue they spoil the uniformity. Whenever they see a colored one, they immediately take it out and burn it. Remember this.”
a. The Taos rely on the silkworms for income
b. Silk worms are an important part of the lives of all Chinese
c. This statement is a metaphor Second Sister uses to warn Ailin
d. Second Sister enjoys talking with Ailin and their discussion included the opinions of bother characters about the silkworms

16. What does Mrs. Liu say to Ailin at her grandmother’s funeral?
a. She’s glad she broke off the engagement
b. She and Hanwei would never have gotten along
c. It was very difficult to break off the engagement
d. Ailin will suffer many more consequences because of her stubborn behavior

17. What is Ailin’s name at school?
a. Miss Tao
b. Ellen
c. Eileen
d. Alana

18. What affect does Father’s death have on Ailin?
a. Ailin’s life is now completely hopeless
b. Everyone at home now ignores her
c. She is forced to stay locked in her room and stay out of Big Uncle’s way
d. Big Uncle now tries harder to control Ailin and her life

19. What does Ms. Gilbertson offer to do to help Ailin?
a. Tutor Ailin
b. Get Ailin a job
c. Let Ailin live with her
d. Sneak Ailin into the school and pay her tuition

20. Which was not one of the options Big Uncle gave Ailin for her future?
a. Marry a farmer
b. Move to America
c. Become a nun
d. Become a concubine

21. Which is not part of Ailin’s responsibilities at the Warners?
a. Doing dishes
b. Taking care of the children
c. Teaching the children
d. Telling the children stories

22. Why was Ailin criticized by Mr. Warner?
a. Telling dangerous folktales
b. Ignoring her duties
c. Not seeing her familly
d. Teaching the children brush writing

23. What did Mr. Warner ask Ailin to do?
a. Take on more teaching responsibility
b. Go to America with them
c. To go visit her family
d. Become a missionary

24. Who came to see Ailin off? What did she give Ailin?
a. Hanwei and a letter from her mother
b. Big Uncle and some money
c. Xueyan and the money Ailin left with Big Uncle
d. Her mother and a locket

25. How was life in San Francisco different for the Warners?
a. They were much wealthier than they were in China
b. They were expected to work much harder in the states
c. They could no longer afford the luxuries they had in China
d. They were not respected in their American society because they were missionaries

26. Why does Ailin stay in America?
a. To marry Hanwei
b. To go to college
c. To marry James Chew
d. To work for another family



Essay: Answer the following questions using essay format- complete sentences, proper grammar, paragraphs, and supporting evidence from the text.

27. Explain how the setting has influenced the plot of the story. How would Ailin’s experiences have been different in a different time or place? Use details from the novel to support your beliefs.



28. Determine if Ailin made the right decision to not have her feet bound. Consider both the positive and negative consequences this had on her life. Use details from the story to support your answer.
1/19/2017 8:41:27 PM
Topic:
Ip Man 2

cmorgan
cmorgan
Posts: 63
Ip man 2 is an amazing movie filled with lots of martial arts and action. Last semester I submitted a review of Ip Man 1. In this movie he was fighting the Japanese during the war. He helped overtake them and gain back China. In Ip Man 2 the big showdown is between China and the British which had occupied Hong Kong. It is set in 1949. The “bad guy” in this is representing the British with a boxer called “The Twister”. The boxer represents the British force. The fighting of Ip Man was of the Wing Chun School. The boxer of course uses only his hands, however Ip Man uses feet, hands and martial arts moves. At one point during the fight however the referee does not allow any kicking. Of course this favors the boxer. Ip Man is still a family man with a second child on the way in this story. Another cool thing is Bruce Lee coming in at the end of the movie at the age of 5. Great movie to show in a history class when you are teaching about British rule in Hong Kong.
1/19/2017 4:06:11 PM
Topic:
Work Skills- High School Special Education

tvancuren
tvancuren
Posts: 71
Chops and Hukou Residency Cards
· Name of the Lesson: Hukou and California IDs
· Grade Level: 9th -12th grade Special Education
· Overview and Purpose: I teach a Work Skills class to high school students who have deficits in the areas of social skills, self-advocacy, and basic transition skills.
· Educational Standard: ELA Standards, Reading Information Text, Grade 9, 1; Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
· Objectives: Students will read Chops and Hukou Residency Cards- Facts and Details http://factsanddetails.com/china/cat11/sub72/entry-4469, which gives information about Chinese stamps and Hukou Residency Cards. Students will understand why Chinese citizens need to have these and what areas of life they cover by making personal cards and designing their own Chop (stamp). Students will compare why a person would need one of these cards with The Californian ID Card. Students will present their Cards and Chop to the class.
· Materials needed: Chops and Hukou Residency Cards; California ID Information, card stock, cork, ink
· Lesson: This will be a multi-day lesson. With students in special education, it is difficult to give time limits on projects- sometimes students may need extended time.
Day 1- Students will brain storm and come up with the importance of having a California ID or Driver’s License. Guided reading- students will read the information about the Hukou Card and make comparisons with the California ID and why it is important to obtain and have.
Day 2- As a class, we will review from the day before and discuss the importance of the Hukou Card and why they will need a California ID or License. I will show pictures of different Hukou cards and pass out samples. Students will gather information that is needed for their Hukou Card and will use card stock to create their own.
Day 3- Students will review the importance of Hukou Cards and why every Chinese Citizen needs one. Students will design their own Chop on a separate piece of paper. Students will use a piece of cork and create their own Chop to stamp their Hukou Card.
Day 4- Students will present their Hukou Cards to the class and articulate why they chose the symbol on their Chop.
Assessment- Students will be graded using a standard rubric for this project. I also like to use what students have learned as we move forward and explore other topics. Another opportunity for students to demonstrate skills and knowledge in this area is by taking them on a field trip to the DMV and becoming familiar with the process of obtaining an appropriate identification for work and leisure.
Tracy VanCuren
1/17/2017 8:29:57 PM
Topic:
Film Review

elizabethr
elizabethr
Posts: 36
I happened to see this film after Christmas, not knowing that it depicted a portion of the Tokugawa Shogunate period that we learned about in Session 4. (I cannot show this film to my students, so I will look for something else for them.) This film is based on the novel "Silence", by Endo Shusaku. Mr. Shusaku said that he saw a (fumie) crucifix in a museum in Nagasaki that was well-worn, he surmised, from many Christians stamping their foot on it to denounce their belief in Christ. He understood how they must have felt, and said that he (as a Catholic) most likely would have done the same, rather than face persecution or death. It made him curious, and so he researched Jesuit archives and found a story of a man named Giuseppe Chiara, which abruptly ended in 1630. He created a possible scenario of what happened to him for his novel. The film changes the story slightly, depicting Portuguese priests, rather than Italian.
This could be a great film for high school. Portions are even suitable for junior high.

Although I cannot show the film 'Silence" to third grade students, I can show a portion of it to illustrate what life was like in Japan during the 1600's, and how it is different now by showing them a film my daughter made on her trip to Japan in 2015. She traveled there with her choir from California Baptist University and pieced together her footage and photographs set to music. If you would like to see it, please email me at elizabethrosales@me.com. I'm sure she wouldn't mind sharing. It occurred to me as I watched it how much Japan has changed. It was quite a contrast.
edited by elizabethr on 1/22/2017
1/17/2017 8:04:02 PM
Topic:
Film Review

jdoll
jdoll
Posts: 35
As Roger Ebert described it, “‘To Live’ is a simple title, but it conceals a universe.” Indeed, “To Live” is a remarkable movie in that it deftly balances the complexity of interpersonal relationships with an epic span of intense historical change. It is all the more remarkable when we understand the constraints and risks the filmmaker, Zhang Yimou, faced in order to make it. The film ran afoul of China’s State Administration of Radio, Film, and Television (SARFT), who banned Yimou and lead actress Gong Li from working for two years. This movie could be used to convey a sort of compressed timeline of Chinese History from the period spanning the triumph of the communists in the Chinese Civil War to the ill-fated Cultural Revolution. Although the film is not explicit in its history, the story and the portrayal of the characters packs an emotional punch that profoundly affects the viewer. Because they will care about the characters, students will naturally want to learn more about this period of Chinese history. The film revolves around Fugui, his wife Jiazhen, and their children, and spans a period of nearly four decades. The film takes them through the communist victory in the Chinese Civil War and several other important events in modern Chinese history. Fugui begins as a wealthy layabout with a gambling problem. When he loses everything in a dice game, his pregnant wife leaves him and he is forced to make a living as a puppeteer. He plies his craft, first with the Kuomintang (he is conscripted) and then with the communists (liberated? conscripted?), and is finally reunited with his wife and children. Fugui’s “riches to rags” experience proves to be a blessing in disguise as the landlord class falls prey to the revolution (as is played out by the unfortunate winner of Fugui’s house and possessions). From there the family experiences the Great Leap Forward (1958-1961) and the Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), each period bringing with it profound joy, uncertainty, and loss. In each of these epochs Fugui and Jiazhen endure personal tragedies that are a subtext for the greater calamities endured by the Chinese people. The Great Leap forward is portrayed as a time of blind optimism, showing communist party members urging citizens to ever greater efforts to meet quotas and surpass the productivity of their enemies. In a heartbreaking scene, Fugui and Jiazhen’s son is killed in an accident, an avoidable tragedy and a microcosm of the reckless policies that would leave millions of Chinese dead from starvation. Later, Fugui and Jiazhen lose their daughter during childbirth because there are no experienced doctors to assist her when she begins hemorrhaging. The tragedy is foreshadowed when they are told by a cheery young “Red Guard” nurse that all the doctors had been “sent away” because they were “reactionaries.” This criticism of the Cultural Revolution is what invoked the ire of Chinese censors and the reason ZhangYimou and Gong Li were banned. The film ends on a happy note, however, as Fugui and Jiazhen enter their elder years, they have their grandson and son-in-law to comfort them. Although life has been hard they have survived with their humanity and dignity intact.
1/16/2017 9:13:52 PM
Topic:
Chabuduo Lesson Additional Files

Mayw
Mayw
Posts: 30
Shocking how the article on China’s cram schools shows images of students with intravenous drips to keep them alert while studying. They are forced to study and the system at Maotanchang prohibits leisure time. It’s quite disturbing to place so much military pressure on students to live up to high expectations and pass the exams. Their mental health is at jeopardy to the point where some students even committed suicide. Most Chinese parents sacrifice a great deal for the future of their only child. Sad to learn of a family’s heartbreak when Cao failed the exam. His father worked overtime just to pay for his Maotanchang costs. Cao’s only other option would be manual labor in the construction site. Hopefully the government establishes laws to protect these students and adds counseling services to support their overall well-being.
1/16/2017 9:13:34 PM
Topic:
Chabuduo Lesson Additional Files

Mayw
Mayw
Posts: 30
Mr. Chabuduo’s story portrays an opposite version of how westerners would view “the most famous person in China”. Funny how “he casually strolled to the station” when the current images of train stations in Asia are viewed as a crowded fast paced race with rude passengers shoving each other and cutting in line to cheat for a front space. Perhaps Chinese people would dream of the casual life style of Mr. Chabuduo for having the freedom of flexibility.
1/16/2017 5:48:58 PM
Topic:
Lesson Plan - 10th Grade World History

Mayw
Mayw
Posts: 30
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1/16/2017 3:12:26 PM
Topic:
ncta summer 2017 study tour to south korea

ngilliam
ngilliam
Posts: 77
If we went to China, are we not allowed to apply for this one? This sounds pretty cool.
1/16/2017 9:26:34 AM
Topic:
ncta summer 2017 study tour to south korea

elizabethr
elizabethr
Posts: 36
Thank you for the info. I'm thinking about it...
1/11/2017 3:29:15 PM
Topic:
free summer study program at shanghai theater acad

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1897
This looks like a wonderful opportunity. I believe that music, dance, and theater students and teachers might benefit from it. Note that they may fill the program with university students. Their big aim is to increase international awareness and appreciation of Chinese opera. Teachers could certainly help with that. If you're interested, don't hesitate to apply.

Free Summer School at Shanghai Theater Academy, 2017
Brief introduction:
The students will study three courses: Chinese opera, Chinese culture, Chinese language. The main course is the traditional Chinese opera, which is composed of the learning of Chinese opera steps and movements, water sleeve routines, spear and sword routines, and selected scene work. Chinese culture and language are supporting courses for students to better understand the essence of traditional Chinese culture. During the program, the students will have the opportunity to see traditional Chinese opera shows and take field trips.

Time:
June 15– July 6, 2017
Chinese opera: 64 lessons
Chinese culture: 9 lessons
Chinese Opera Introduction: 16 lessons
Chinese languages: 16 lessons

Application deadline:
April 15 2017

Assessment:
The attendance rate over 90% is required for the program. At the end of the program, the students will be assessed in the form of a reporting performance. The certificate of completion will be issued on passing the assessment and getting the required attendance rate.

Expense:
Tuition fee: free
International flight expenses: to be borne by the students
Lodging: free, provided by Shanghai Theatre Academy
Living subsidy: 50 yuan/day, provided by Shanghai Theatre Academy
Deposit:40 USD. Student who has been enrolled should transfer 40USD to STA as deposit .The deposit will be returned on the registration day by RMB.
Bank information:
Name:SHANGHAI THEATRE ACADEMY
Account:31001539700050012523
Bank:China Construction Bank, Shanghai Yanan Road Branch
Bank Add:200 Zhen Ning Road, Shanghai, China
Post code:200040
Tel:0086-21-62498831
Swift Code:PCBCCNBJSHX

Requirements:
1. Foreign students between 16 and 30 years old. University students preferred.
2. Interested in Chinese culture, and willing to learn China opera
3. Priority is given to students focusing on Chinese studies or with art background like acting and dancing .
4. Students from non-English speaking country should be able to communicate in English fluently and need to provide some certificate which can prove your English level when you apply.

Application materials:
1. Passport copy;
2. 2 photos of 2 inches and one ordinary life photo
3. Application form (available via the below contact)
4. University certificate;
5. Resume and other materials related to the application.

Please send the above materials to:
Shirley Zou
Foreign Students Office
Shanghai Theatre Academy
630 Huashan Road, Shanghai, China
200040
Tel:0086-21-62485215 Fax:0086-21-62485596
Email:micgirl@126.com

Visa:
Students shall apply for and receive the visa with at least one-month stay in China in their own countries.

Medical Insurance:
Students shall take care of their own personal accident insurance for the stay in Chin
edited by Clay Dube on 1/11/2017
1/10/2017 5:48:10 PM
Topic:
Lesson Plan - 10th Grade World History

jhayden
jhayden
Posts: 33
3-4 Session Lesson Plan

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