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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Yamashita - The Origins of Japanese Food (Tue)

Movement in East Asia
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7/21/2016 2:18:33 PM

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 152
Subject: Yamashita - The Origins of Japanese Food
Please download and read the attached documents before the Tuesday morning session.
edited by cgao on 7/22/2016

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7/26/2016 10:12:03 AM

rmcgill
rmcgill
Posts: 7
Subject:
Are there any aspects of the Japanese diet that are unhealthy and pose common afflictions in Japanese society?
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7/26/2016 10:35:40 AM

jmallard
jmallard
Posts: 22
Subject:
http://news.yale.edu/2006/06/01/green-tea-and-asian-paradox

I have always been intrigued with the benefits of green tea. Although scientists cannot fully explain the "Asian Paradox" which refers to the very low incidence of both heart disease and cancer in Asia, I believe that there has to be a assured link instead of just a theory to the "Asian Paradox" especially since cigarette consumption is so much higher. The life expectancy of Asians is so much higher than any other ethnicity and it just make me wonder if the foods and drinks that are apart of their culture play a factor here. I have started consuming more green tea and just like Mr. Yamashita stated, "It makes my mind sharp." Interestingly it also seems to have a different and less crash after effect on me than coffee does. There definitely needs to be more studies done here to help solidify if there is a correlation with green tea and the highest life span within the Asian culture.
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7/26/2016 10:47:06 AM

rmcgill
rmcgill
Posts: 7
Subject:
What are some of the challenges facing the Japanese fishing industry? Has the demand for delicacies such as shark fin soup resulted in ongoing conflicts related to international fishing and trade agreements?
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7/26/2016 10:54:05 AM

jmallard
jmallard
Posts: 22
Subject:
http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2005.html

I love and admire the Japanese table manners and the evidence of respect for family that occurs while eating. I am interested in learning how did some of the traditions begin such as taking off shoes, eating at a low table using cushions, etc.

I could definitely use the article to help me teach my 2nd graders Japanese table manners possibly in a small group of 5 at a time. Thanks for sparking my idea for a lesson plan! Different food cultures are always interesting and fun to learn more about!
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7/26/2016 10:58:07 AM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: Unhealthy Japanese Diet
This post is in response to the question regarding unhealthy Japanese diet; historically Japanese foods, like Professor Yamashita had introduced, are well-balanced with meats, proteins, vegetables, and rice. The portions were appropriately sized and and this created a healthy and long-living Japanese society. However, especially with the Westernization of Japan, more and more Japanese are suffering from health issues like high blood pressure and obesity. More and more of the foods being introduced into the markets are highly processed foods which are also very high in fats. A visit to any Japanese market today means you not only leave with a bag of rice, some fresh fish, and vegetables but also "cheese curls," potato chips, macha kitkats, and several bottles of extremely sweet drinks like "ramune" or "gokkuri" (citrus drink). Both Japanese and western restaurants, like Coco's and Denny's, are also beginning to serve large portions; at ramen restaurants in Japan, and also here in the US, you can ask for additional servings of ramen noodles ("kaedama"). For those on the run and in a rush, people can easily to go convenience stores, food kiosks, and even food vending machines to get decent, but very unhealthy, meals. I believe that all of these elements are contributing to the increasing unhealthiness of the Japanese diet.

Interesting article:

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2012/03/11/national/science-health/obesity-on-the-rise-as-japanese-eat-more-western-style-food/
edited by mhagiwara on 7/26/2016
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7/26/2016 11:48:02 AM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
My students always confuse Chinese food with Japanese food. Many Japanese food is originally from China, such baozi, jiaozi, ranmen, etc. But Japanese developed their own flavors and styles. I will definitely add one lesson into the unit of Chinese food to help students to identify the differences between Chinese food and Japanese food.
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7/26/2016 11:48:56 AM

iverdin
iverdin
Posts: 49
Subject:
Today’s lecture by Dr. Yamashita was enriching, interesting and engaging. Food is a great deal for all cultures, it’s an important element of cultural identity and including it in this sessions was a great idea. I always eat Japanese food and it never had crossed my mind where it all originated. What interested me the most was the fact that in modern Japan there were the four types of cuisines having the warriors leading the list. Dr. Yamashita’s presentation will help me create a lecture on primitive foods in specific countries in Latin America before colonization and after. It would be very interesting for the students to see how our ancestors fed themselves and what were their cooking procedures and original ingredients.
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7/26/2016 11:49:53 AM

kluna
kluna
Posts: 82
Subject:
The history of ramen was so interesting, especially the global consumption. According to the handout from professor Yamashita, within 12 years, we see a growth of instant ramen servings from 15 billion to 100 billion! I am really interested in seeing the demographic breakdown of consumption. I wonder if more men eat ramen than women and if it more popular amongst certain countries. According to the Huffington Post (link found below), it was a luxury item in Japanese stores because it was more expensive than regular udon. It is so interesting that now, it is one of the cheapest things you could eat. According to the Huffington post article, if you ate Cup Noodles for every meal for a day, it would cost you $150!!! Anyways, if you haven’t completed your ramen fix, here’s a fun read: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/09/10/ramen-facts_n_5784632.html
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7/26/2016 12:00:03 PM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Reflection/Reading: The Untold Story of Ramen
It was interesting to read the article on the history of ramen. Ramen having been introduced by the Chinese, perhaps coming through Korea, seems to have become a staple for blue collar workers in Japan. I liked reading about the history of the popularity, such as the 1920’s-30’s ramen was a significant food source for the working class. Ramen first appeared to be popular during Japan’s industrial period with the workers wanted something fast, cheap, and something that would make them feel full. Ramen lost popularity during WWII Japan as it was affected in terms of scarcity. In the years following the war there was an increase in the availability and popularity of ramen again. I like to teach my students about how major historical events can impact art, and fashion, and now I can also include food.

In going to the many ramen restaurants that are popping up all over Los Angeles and Pasadena it is interesting that most ramen shops mention on the menu something in regard to the “affordability” and the significance of ramen. I guess sushi does have a different stigma or even social class target that is different from ramen.


I also thought the information presented by Sam Yamashita was interesting. I did not realize that there was a purpose to the presentation or display of a meal. After showing us the presentation and the rituals for a meal presented to a warrior, this prompted some questions for me.
Questions:
Did warriors and middle to lower class citizens in Japan eat in the same restaurants?
How does presentation and ritual differ from a warrior to the middle and lower classes?
Is there a reason for the Japanese eating 2 times per day 10am and 4pm?
Are there any particular traditions based on holidays such as the New Year?
Are there any significant differences between Chinese, Korean, and Japanese ramen?
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7/26/2016 12:02:10 PM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: The Origins of Japanese Food
Fascinating ideas for using food and culinary culture to teach history, geography and social studies. Using the history of Ramen to explain the history of 20th century Japan is a great example of how to teach. Great articles and talk on food. Many ideas on how to teach several standards using the history of food. Great lessons on fusion cuisines. Would love to read the Untold Story of Ramen
edited by rbrady on 7/26/2016
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7/26/2016 12:55:41 PM

cgonzalez
cgonzalez
Posts: 59
Subject: Japanese food
Talking about all that food made me really hungry! [font=Times, " times="" new="" roman",="" serif]Dr. Yamashita did a great job explaining where all that yummy food came from. It's really interesting that there are ceremonial ways of eating dinner, I wonder what would students say would be their ceremony if they were to have one. I think that would open up a great conversation in the class room. [/font]
edited by cgonzalez on 7/26/2016
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7/26/2016 1:00:07 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject:
One of the more interesting points (brief as it was) was the idea of transnational history as a discipline. As a non-history major, it really made sense to me to approach history thematically and away from the traditional chronologies and histories of conflict. The study of food is a great way to embody this. The idea of "warrior envy" was also interesting to me with its potential ties to coming of age for adolescents; it could be a great discussion starter.

One question I did have was about the function of the presentation of food (including writing about food). Did the powers that be use it as a means of control? OR was it purely aesthetic?

Most definitely, the history of ramen is something that I will use as a unit because of the layered history and cultural ties found within it.
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7/26/2016 1:06:16 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject: Honzen Dining
One thing I found interesting about reading the Honzen Dining article was how much detail was spent describing the food and preparation of food, but not necessarily the reasons behind such choices. The end of the excerpt basically said a lot of people couldn't eat in the manner described but still enjoyed reading about it. This reminded me of our culture's fascination with cooking shows and documentaries about food/chefs.

I still want to know more about the "why", however.
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7/26/2016 1:25:19 PM

nminassian
nminassian
Posts: 23
Subject: The beginings of Japanese Food
I really enjoyed Mr. Yamashita's presentation. As a middle eastern woman I was constantly trying to find some similarities in both cuisines. Well, I couldn't find any, and learning something so different was fascinating. In our culture it is as many fresh ingredients as possible, and we use excessive amount of red meat. We also use one tray of humongous portion of food for the whole family, while in Japanese culture everything was in tiny portions and in numerous trays. I still can't see the necessity of using so many trays and so many dishes. It was surprising to learn that a lot of Japanese food had Chinese and Portuguese origins. I have learned about 4 basic Japanese cooking techniques, and how the amount or ingredients of the tray content were changing from imperial, Buddhist, tea ceremony and warrior status. Learning about the beginning of Ramen noodles was very interesting.
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7/26/2016 6:36:36 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1920
Subject: paul solt -
Some who were interested in the Paul Solt book on the invention and spread of instant ramen may wish to read this article he wrote on how perceptions of it changed in a rising Japan:
http://ijaps.usm.my/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/GeorgeSolt-InstantRamen.pdf
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7/26/2016 9:09:25 PM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject: Yamashito and Liza Dalby website
It was very interesting reading and hearing that the term for chef literally means "knife wielder" and that sometimes prepared food in front of guests sounds like the precursor to restaurants like Beni Hanna. I never knew that sashimi means "raw flesh" which doesn't sound too appetizing. This information about Japanese food would be a great lesson for students.
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7/26/2016 9:41:20 PM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: In between
While listening to Pf. Yamashita's lecture, I was wondering how exactly NE Asian cuisines have influenced each other in the 20th century. Korea's modern cuisine had definitely been influenced by Japan during colonial period yet it still maintains its own style.
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7/26/2016 9:57:02 PM

ysun
ysun
Posts: 21
Subject:
I just found there are Ramen Burger in "H mart" this weekend. How interesting.
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7/26/2016 9:58:42 PM

ysun
ysun
Posts: 21
Subject: Instant Ramen
I thought the ramen was invented by Japanese, and surprised that it was invented by a Taiwanese. When Mr.Yamashita showed us picture of the first “chikin ramen”, it brings so many memories from elementary school days. It was new to us, and not that cheap for just a noodle, but my next seat boy had them twice a week, I was so jealous of him.
Thanks to Mr. Yamashita gave us so much interesting information about Ramen. It is not only a noodle soup anymore , it is a popular food worldwide. It is fun to know there are top 10 popular been selected every year, I wish I can try them all.
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