USC
University of Southern California
Forum Recent Topics Recent Posts Search USCI K-12
Messages in this topic - RSS

Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Yamashita - The Origins of Japanese Food (Tue)

Movement in East Asia
pages: 1 2 3 |
8/12/2016 11:01:50 AM

jschilp
jschilp
Posts: 24
Subject:
So instead of post during the presentations on the first few days, I was listening carefully to the presentations and, at least for this one, getting very hungry. I've taken the new knowledge give us here and mixed it into my own culinary fun. With the new Ramen craze that's sprung up over the last year or so, I am now ready to move past the salty, starchy stuff from college years to some new ideas & tastes. One of the best surprises to me was the customs and traditions regarding the depiction of dining in film & television as well as how formal dining habits are.
permalink
8/13/2016 5:02:31 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: The untold story of ramen
This reading gave me some great ideas on some activities to do with a club that my students and I are thinking about starting this year to develop their appreciation and knowledge of the various cultures around Alhambra. Many of my students feel like they are living in a foreign country at times, which can be both good and bad. Good in that they are being exposed to other ways of living, but bad because of the sense of the defensiveness that comes about from the feeling of alienation. They never go into the restaurants or stores (unless it's a Korean own liquor store) and they feel cut off the an entire segment of their own community. I want to link to what they already experience (i.e. cup noodles) as a spring board into a deeper transformative cultural experience.
permalink
8/29/2016 7:10:38 PM

ndaza
ndaza
Posts: 20
Subject: Japaese Food
It was so interesting to hear professor Yamashita's lecture on the origins of Japanese food. I have always been fascinated by all the rituals at the table. It reminded me when I used to go visit my grandparents' house. we used to dress up for dinner and it was served in a very orderly manner. All courses were served on individual plates the only difference was that you got one plate at a time.
permalink
8/29/2016 7:15:05 PM

ndaza
ndaza
Posts: 20
Subject: Ramen Noodles
The history of the origins of the Ramen Noodles was very educational. I was surprised to find out that a Taiwanese was responsible for this invention that has broken all borders from Japan to the rest of the world, the masses LOVE LOVE LOVE instant Ramen noodles.
permalink
8/29/2016 7:23:04 PM

ndaza
ndaza
Posts: 20
Subject: More Ramen Noodles
I also love eating instant ramen noodles but I stopped eating them because of the very little nutritional value and high sodium. As I was listening to the lecture, I kept thinking to myself. This will make a very good lesson on nutrition. Let's make the instant ramen noodles a healthier meal. Ask students to come up with a good balance meal using instant ramen noodles.
permalink
8/29/2016 9:48:06 PM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: Food lesson plan?
If there was a golden key to entice students with history class, it would be a 'food' talk. I am not sure whether I can hand out the recipes to students but I can vision myself using pictures from PF. Yamashita's presentation to hook students. Especially my 7th graders love Samurai stuff so I can use this topic as a hook.
permalink
8/30/2016 6:59:00 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject: Japanese food
I have always been curious why Japanese restaurants always serve their food in a Bento tray. Now it all seems to makes sense.
permalink
8/31/2016 9:18:58 PM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject: Japanese food
This would be a great lesson for students in trying foods from other cultures. At my school we used to have a cultural faire where students/parents/teachers of different cultures would bring food to share with the all the staff and students. This would be a great addition to this event. I would like to bring back this tradition to include Japanese food and its origins.
permalink
9/1/2016 7:16:57 PM

victoriachan
victoriachan
Posts: 27
Subject: The Untold Story of Ramen
This article was fascinating because I didn’t know that ramen started as a mean for the working class. I just thought it was ubiquitous throughout Japan for centuries. I think this quote sums it up for me how ramen is seen in Japan: “Its preeminent role in the postwar Japanese diet can perhaps be understood as similar to the role of pizza in American food practices.” Pizza is ubiquitous in the U.S., and by comparing ramen to pizza in this way helps to solidify exactly how ramen has influenced Japanese cuisine.

I think students would benefit from learning about how there are different types of ramen. I eat Japanese ramen often (specifically from Shin Sen Gumi), and sometimes when I talk to my students about eating it, they think I’m eating Cup O Noodles most of the time. Only the students who are consumers of Japanese culture understand what I am talking about, but it’s not many of them. It’s sad, too, because my students live so close to Little Tokyo so it’s a short bus ride away. I would think about using ramen as a way to get them out of their bubbles.
permalink
9/1/2016 7:18:24 PM

victoriachan
victoriachan
Posts: 27
Subject: Japanese table manners
@jmallard
I could definitely use the article to help me teach my 2nd graders Japanese table manners possibly in a small group of 5 at a time. Thanks for sparking my idea for a lesson plan! Different food cultures are always interesting and fun to learn more about!


I would love to see this lesson in action. I am curious if you will also teach about the table manners of other cultures for comparison or if they are to think about the table manners that are expected in their own homes. Would you think about having a sort of “International Day” event as well?
permalink
9/1/2016 11:37:27 PM

yreynoso
yreynoso
Posts: 23
Subject: Road to multicultural gastronomy
file:///C:/Users/Owner/Downloads/3.%20Road%20to%20Multicultural%20Gastronomy%20(1).pdf

This story on Food, Power and Identity by Katarzyna J. Cwiertka describes a period in history where trading was flourishing between western and Asian countries. At this time, according to the story Westerners demonstrated evident resistance to Japanese and Chinese food, even though the choices available were mainly based on tea, rice, and vegetables, which were far more nutritive than the so called western food based on lard, meat, poultry, and bread. However and throughout means of international trading, foods, adaptations to the Japanese gastronomy was slowly adopted even though resistance from both cultures had some clashing moments. Some foreigners described Japanese /Chinese food as fishy, and abominable tasteless..", which only worsened their misery when their "delicious European food" was not available in the local markets for months.

I really would like to plan a lesson on Asian gastronomy where my students could observe and analyze how during the 1800s western food was scarce in Japan and China; they should be able to discriminate how during these years of transition between both cultures, a lot of changes had to occur for the British and other investors in order to flourish as business people. My students should be able to appreciate through research, videos, and geography, how the ports of Yokohama, Nagasaki, and others, grew as the main sites for international trading. Students will identify the social and economical factors that catapulted the development of the restaurant and hotels industry that generated the economical and cultural expansion of western and Asian as a byproduct of international trading in Asia.

This topic is so rich that will require various days to explore and understand how the evolution of Japanese and Chinese food took several years to be accepted and digested by westerners. This would open a discussion session where a multi-cultural culinary appreciation will take place in small groups. I will assign a each group with some countries in East Asia to investigate the story of typical dishes and to present their outcomes to the class. Another day, they should bring the ingredients to prepare a meal in class, and have an Asian food festival. As a variation, I would take them into a field trip to a Chinese or Japanese restaurant/ or as a homework assignment to observe the menu, explore foods, tastes, table manners, in order to identify and report differences and similarities between own native culture and Asian foods, and table manners.
permalink
9/3/2016 11:53:58 AM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: One more thing to add
I think Japanese people slurp while drinking tea as well. I am a heavy tea drinker and slurps tea because I can actually taste my tea better. However, it is kind of rude in Korea and in the US so I do it just at home.
permalink

Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Yamashita - The Origins of Japanese Food (Tue)





Powered by Forum 6.9.4.0 © 2006-2011 USC US-China Institute