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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Cheung - World Trade Center (Mon)

Movement in East Asia
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7/21/2016 8:33:22 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1920
Subject: Cheung - World Trade Center (Mon)
Two reports on foreign direct investment (FDI) from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corporation. Please take a look at the executive summary of the 2016 report. If you're interested, you may wish to look at the rest of the report and compare it to the 2009 report. (Reading the full reports is OPTIONAL.)

2016: http://laedc.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/WTCLA-FDI-FINAL-6.16.pdf

2009: http://laedc.org/reports/FDI-2009.pdf

Stephen mentioned the trip Mayor Garcetti took to East Asia. I happened to be in China at that time. I wrote an issue of Talking Points that looked at the history of LA mayors going or wanting to go to China. http://china.usc.edu/talking-points-november-24-december-5-2014 You can read about troubles the city government had with the China/Taiwan diplomatic rivalry and other challenges associated with seeking to foster business and cultural ties.

Here's another Talking Points about a 1979 visit to Los Angeles: http://china.usc.edu/talking-points-january-29-february-12-2014

To learn more about city and state diplomacy, please take a look at US-China Today's report on last year's climate change summit hosted by Mayor Garcetti.
http://www.uschina.usc.edu/w_usct/showarticle.aspx?articleID=20013&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

We have a database that includes sub-national diplomatic exchanges. You can search for various states.
http://uschinaexchange.usc.edu
edited by Clay Dube on 7/26/2016
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7/25/2016 1:07:59 PM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Foreign Owned Enterprise
In reading the first portion of this article on foreign investment I was very surprised to see how many foreign businesses there are in the United States and more specifically in Southern California. I am shocked that 10% of jobs in Southern California are a result of foreign business. In recent political conversation about jobs being sent overseas, it sounds like there are an awful lot of jobs that are being supplied as well and probably vice versa.
Question: With Japan being #1 for Foreign Owned Establishments, why is China so far down on the same list?

These articles and charts were worth the glance.
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7/25/2016 3:08:28 PM

jmallard
jmallard
Posts: 22
Subject:
The question posed about the educational system and being connected to helping our students falls into a long list of problems. Common Core has a lot of push back from teachers and parents, however it is needed because it truly helps students to think critically. Our educational structure is so in a box that we have trained our kids to think only one way to get an answer. Many teachers find it hard because its easier to simply teach that "one way" to solve a problem. It's up to teachers in the classroom and parents at home to allow our students to think outside of the box. We can set a bar such as a rubric, but still allow students to navigate their way to the top instead of telling them the one or maybe two ways to get there when in fact there can be multiple ways. Using career success as an analogy, and seeing Stephen and the way he navigated to the position he is at today is not the traditional way our mind is structured for a person to be hired or have the necessary experience for that position. So we have to start at the Pre- K level to have this type of open ended type of thinking and creativity and allow it to continue throughout for students. If we continue this as teachers in our educational system, I believe over time we can change the idealist type of thinking we have in mind for a person to reach multiple levels of success.
edited by jmallard on 7/25/2016
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7/25/2016 5:46:23 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject:
First of all, I'd like to thank Steven(or is it Stephen?) for taking the time to speak to us today. I was most impressed not by his knowledge of the subject, but by his genuine conviction in making a positive difference in the community. I can only imagine the frustrations he had to endure and the bureaucracy he had to weave through in order to get anything done.
Having said that, I'm concern about the housing affordability issue. While it is great that we can get more and more foreign companies to invest in our city, the side effect of that would be the rising cost of housing and living standards. There have been a growing trend of college graduates moving back to live with their parent, not because they want to but because they cannot afford to live on their own. It's becoming harder and harder for young couples to pursue the American dream of owning a home locally, especially when they have to compete against investors who can pay everything in cash.
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7/25/2016 5:48:16 PM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject:
Great presentation by Robert Cheung of the World Trade Center. Good to see that Los Angeles is being proactive in courting electric car investment in the area in light of Toyota pulling out of Torrance. My class while studying elements of art was looking at electric car designs for China for their innovative use of shape and form.
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7/25/2016 5:52:12 PM

juanae
juanae
Posts: 57
Subject:
Stephen Cheung, presentation about Los Angeles, blew my mind away. I lived in at least 6 different cities in the LA county, but never thought about how many cities are part of it, 88 to 100 with the incorporated cities. Also, the that LA's economy is larger that some European countries
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7/25/2016 6:05:02 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
It was a surprise to find out that Japan ranks the #1 for foreign owned establishments in the United States. Many people might think it is China. China sell a lot of products to the United States, but these products are not produced in the United States, so it won't create many jobs in the states. Also, Japan owns more prestigious manufacturing companies than China, such as Toyota, Honda, Sony, Nissan, etc. But it is hard to name even one prestigious Chinese manufacturing company. I only know TCL, Haier, and Lenovo. Not that famous as Toyota or sony. I hope you heard of them before.
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7/25/2016 8:32:14 PM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: Why students need to learn world history
First of all, I want to say thank you to Mr. Cheung for the fantastic presentation.


Although I am here in LA as a recent immigrant and I see people from different places of the world every day, I often forget that I am in the most globalized city in the world. Mr. Cheung's presentation reminded me of what kind of place I have lived, and I think history teachers must teach about this in the beginning of school year especially in California. I believe students can find history classes more interesting, if they know they will learn about the roots of their neighbors who are from different parts of the world.


By the way, I found a link to Mr. Cheung's presentation: https://prezi.com/dznkm4n2ailp/uli-presentation/ .
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7/25/2016 8:44:28 PM

ysun
ysun
Posts: 21
Subject:
I feel lucky to have this opportunity learn so many information related to L.A from Stephen Cheung. Many times we hear people talk about the economic issues about U.S, or Los Angeles but never have chance to learn exactly the basic information of this city.
From the number of the incorporate cities, the percentage of different industries in L. A, the impact from the foreign owned companies, to how the education system for the new job market. Stephen is really opened our view to the new trend of trading in Los Angles.
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7/25/2016 9:06:49 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject: Stephen Cheung: Los Angeles World Trade Center (non-profit)
Aside from the interesting data presented by Stephen, what resonated with me, as both a teacher and as a father of two young people, was the idea that we as consumers have a lot of power over the ups and downs of our economy, including the trade deficit. However, we can only wield this "power" if we're informed and educated about all sides of the proverbial coin so we can make educated and calculated decisions with our resources. I think it's important for our young people to understand the ripple effects of our spending has on the local economy and thus quality of life for ourselves and others. Problem solving and critical thinking as skills should be at the forefront of all that we do as educators. Jmallard hit the nail on the head, so to speak, when it was mentioned that open ended thinking in Pre-K should be the standard. If this type of thinking was developed throughout K-12 (or possibly shake up the system entirely and make it a Pre-K - College/Trade curriculum) then our kids would organically find their individual niches because they would be given time to think, communicate and collaborate to solve real problems, together. Seeing any topic/issue "globally" is key, but it has to start "locally" so as to not overwhelm the mind. I felt the Hot Pockets to Dumpling story was just brilliant! Thanks for that! I'm going to use a lot of what was shared today in my World Cultures: Pacific Rim class.
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7/25/2016 9:12:47 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject: Open Ended thinking
As an educator and father of a 5 and 2 year old, I have to wholeheartedly agree with the open ended thinking idea. I have had the good fortune to have taught in Pre-K, K, elementary, middle and now high school, not to mention coached high school football, for over 15 years. The absolute best, most resonant and valuable learning that I've ever observed were "ah ha" moments where the students problem solve for themselves using the structures we (as teachers) create around them to support their collaborations. If we give too many "rules" we train our young people to be rigid and not flexible. We need just enough rules to keep them alive/safe, but allow for risks to be taken without fear of judgement because fear of judgement is what paralyzes all kids, young and old. Thanks for that comment, jmallard.
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7/25/2016 10:14:22 PM

njimenez
njimenez
Posts: 58
Subject: Response to Cheung's lecture
Stephen Cheung’s lecture was very fascinating to hear. Learned how important LA county is when compared to the rest of the earths international trade and how it is considered the number one trade center in the world. His lecture was very much and eye opener for me because I have to admit that I am one of the drivers that hates going to Long Beach because of the pollution I see near the ports. I also hate to see so many trucks driving by me in the mornings because of the pollution they emit. After his lecture it helped me appreciate how much LA county does for the US. I now understand why China and the USA work so close to together because of the trade and commerce they produce which leads to economic growth. Now this would be a great introduction to any lesson that teaches about China. This can get students to become more engaged in the topic and understand the importance LA county does for the USA and not just California. I definitely plan on using the resources provided.
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7/25/2016 10:47:26 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: Stephen Cheung
While Stephen's report, without question, serves as a invaluable resource for the international business community seeking to do business in the region and for those scholars and academics studying the movement of people, goods and ideas, his personal story and the work that he does through the non-profit is just as compelling if not inspiring. In addition, I learned a few things about the Ports of L.A. and Long Beach today, satisfying my some of my curiosity that is pique every time I drive past those behemoth superstructures. I have a greater appreciation for the role that trade plays in the exchange of ideas, and the complex web of interconnectivity.
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7/26/2016 12:00:53 AM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: Stephen Cheung - World Trade Center LA-Long Beach
Great presentation from Robert Cheung of the World Trade Center. Appreciate hearing the story of his personal background. Nice to see such talented sincere local grown leadership. Really a testament to why as an area of immigration we become stronger. These are not just benefits for us but lessons for nations like Japan that are struggling to find their own way. As long as individuals like Stephen remain positive and optimistic we all benefit from their experiences. Do really hope he considers higher office some day individuals like this will get my vote. Would be nice to have electric car investment from China to replace Toyota.
edited by rbrady on 7/26/2016
edited by rbrady on 7/26/2016
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7/26/2016 12:11:15 AM

nminassian
nminassian
Posts: 23
Subject: Stephen Cheung
Amazing man, awesome presentation, unbelievable life... I enjoyed every second of his presentation. The numbers he was talking about were hard to understand. While I felt great learning that LA is #1 in many aspects, it was also scary learning that we are loosing major companies to places with less regulations and cheaper work force. I can't believe that Mr. Cheung was a social worker before becoming the President of World Trade Center in LA. I have learned a lot from his presentation and appreciate all his hard work. It was obvious he enjoys everything he does, and he should be a role model to our future generation.
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7/26/2016 7:14:26 AM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1920
Subject:
Quick reply to Yan. Japanese investment in LA is no. 1, but in the US as a whole the UK is the top cumulative investor.
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7/26/2016 11:15:18 AM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject:
Stephen was a great speaker. I am so happy that he and his mother survived and he became such a knowledgeable and caring individual. This country has many immigrants the have and will contribute to the wellness of America. We all must make our opinions heard about the need to take care of the immigration issues in this country. Our students must be made aware of the fact that they must get involved in the solutions.
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7/26/2016 9:16:38 PM

gmora
gmora
Posts: 23
Subject: Stephen Cheung
As Stephen was presenting I thought about the switch to common core and how critical it is to make sure our students can compete to meet the needs of the transitioning work environment. As Stephen mentioned, investors/companies come to L.A. because of the talent pool and labor force that exists in the region. If we can ensure our students our prepared for 21st century jobs than the more attractive the region will be to investors.

On another note, driving through LA its hard not to notice the run down streets and neglected neighborhoods. I find it amazing to hear about the amount of money produced by LA/LA county region (I believe Stephen said it was the 20th largest economy in the world) yet the city of LA has problems with homelessness, promoting affordable housing and maintaining its infrastructure. How is it possible that the city/region can create such wealth yet not provide suitable living environment for its residents? I am sure the answer is complex, much like the concept of trying to figure out which cities are part of LA proper.
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7/26/2016 11:45:09 PM

victoriachan
victoriachan
Posts: 27
Subject: Cheung - World Trade Center
One of the things that most surprised me about this presentation was that LA does have a lot of industries that I was unaware of. The main one of interest to me were the Ports of LA and Long Beach partially because they explain why there is so much traffic and so many trucks on the road. As a science teacher, I worry about the environmental impact that this has not just on our region but also the entire planet. I am glad to know that there are regulations in place to make sure we do our part to curb climate change as much as possible.
However, one of the things that I would like to have elaborated on is an outline of which places in LA are part of LA county, unincorporated cities, etc. Is there a resource out there that would be useful?
edited by victoriachan on 7/26/2016
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7/27/2016 2:09:12 AM

yreynoso
yreynoso
Posts: 23
Subject: WTC: Steven Chaung
Steven's presentation was incredibly captivating, full of statistics, and eye opening facts about how the economy of Los Angeles is highly impacted by East Asia powerful investors. I had no idea how much money is "moved" around the metropolitan area of Los Angeles, but the data presented blew my mind. This young man is a world of knowledge and incredible talent. It was very interesting to learn that many of the new building projects are devoted to international commerce and the preservation and extension of jobs for the community. I am very proud to live in Los Angeles and to be a witness of the wonderful economical power that Los Angles represent to the world as an ideal place to import and export goods and services.
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