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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Dube - East Asia and the West (Tuesday)

Movement in East Asia
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7/21/2016 8:39:36 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1921
Subject: Dube - tuesday afternoon
The documents here are primary source accounts and recent newspaper reports.

heaver -- about Chinese soldiers in the American civil war

I have attached my presentation. As before, I had to compress it and break it into smaller pieces. You may use it for your own reference and you are welcome to show it in your classroom. Do not otherwise share it or post it on the net. Thank you.

Please note that we did not see the full presentation. Some of the sections we didn't discuss include how Western countries forced China to open its doors, first through war and then through treaties. You'll see missionaries gain access to China, where they condemned foot-binding and expanded educational choices. Foreign governments compelled China to turn over its customs administration (import/export controls/taxation) to a foreigner. Foreigners enjoyed extraterritorial privileges, that is they were not subjected to Chinese law, even though they were in China. This process is referred to now in China as national humiliation and led to the description of 1839-1949 as a century of humiliation. This naturally generates resentment and is part of the context in which China and other countries interact. The official "national humiliation day" is September 18. In 2015, we took a group of teachers to the Never Forget National Humiliation Museum in Shenyang.
edited by Clay Dube on 7/27/2016
edited by Clay Dube on 7/27/2016

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7/25/2016 10:59:00 AM

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 152
Subject: Required readings
Please download and read the attached documents.

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7/25/2016 5:56:01 PM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Article: Chinese Soldiers in the American Civil War
There is a shocking number of Chinese who came to America during the period just prior to the Gold Rush and leading up to the American Civil War. It is surprising to hear about how many soldiers fought in this war only to be met with racial discrimination following the war. Something more surprising is that some of the Chinese who fought in the Civil War also struggled to gain naturalization and on top of that were prevented from participating in World War I as soldiers.
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7/25/2016 8:53:22 PM

cgonzalez
cgonzalez
Posts: 59
Subject: Land Without Gohsts
Land without gohsts was the insight of a chinese traveler writing about his experience in America. The way he explains how we "select" a "deputy leader" made me laugh a little because I pictured myself as a chinese trying to understand how Americans select their leader, I saw myself very confused. I can see this article being used in a history class and being analyzed up and down to help students understand how we actually select our president.
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7/25/2016 9:37:07 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: FUKUZAWA YUKICHI
Also coming from a culture with similar values to Japan, I can totally get where Fukuzawa is coming from. From his description of the vast amount of waste to what he had to pay for a bottle of oyster, "...and there where only twenty to thirty in a bottle at that" which by the way is exactly how I feel about Doritos... is very telling of the differences in world views.
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7/25/2016 10:44:59 PM

gmora
gmora
Posts: 23
Subject: Land without Ghosts
It is interesting to read Zhang’s observations of mundane events during his travels in the United States. His writing is detailed and engaging, especially when he is describing the landscape of Oakland. It is also funny to read what captures his attention, for example, he briefly refers to how women walk and talk or even his confusion between the terms “outhouse” and “whitehouse”. His description of New York is also very interesting.
I would use this resource in a point of view lesson plan. I would ask my students to consider how a native of the U.S. would write about what they see and hear on a daily basis compared to what a tourist would write about? What determines the focal point of the observation (class, gender, age, experience)?
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7/25/2016 10:52:17 PM

cgonzalez
cgonzalez
Posts: 59
Subject: From the Autobiography of Yukichi Fukuzawa 1898.pdf
I found this article really entertaining. Just the fact that a Japanese traveler coming to America knowing close to nothing about the culture and society is a frighting thought to me. Everything is so different in America for the most part. Every time I travel and come back here I get a sort of culture shock at how things work here.
This would also be a great article for students to dissect and put them selves in the shoes of someone who does not know the culture of other societies and how open minded you must be in order to get what you need to survive.
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7/25/2016 11:18:17 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject:
Tokyo's Disneyland is actually one of the cheaper ones internationally.
http://time.com/money/4368193/disney-theme-parks-admission-cost/
edited by hlien on 7/27/2016
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7/25/2016 11:22:51 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject:
Chinese fighting in American civil war, really? They didn't teach me this in my high school's American history class!
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7/25/2016 11:47:43 PM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: East Asians in the US - Civil War
Great article to engage students of Asian decent into Civil War lessons and follow up discussions on immigration policies of the US and East Asian nations. When students see faces from history that reflect what they see in the mirror it makes the experience personal and therefore interesting.
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7/26/2016 8:38:50 AM

gmora
gmora
Posts: 23
Subject: The Power and Threat of America
I was really struck at Liang's commentary on income disparity in the United States in the early 20th century. I believe if we were not aware of the time frame the same observations would be relevant today. Additionally, I think it interesting that an outsider was able to recognize the major fault in the United States during this timeframe and seems as a forecast of the Great Depression. Liang's travel provide him with the ability to judge this social and economic inequality as a symptom of all major cities during this time frame. Liang's unfiltered view of New York provides additional insight to the lives of immigrants living in poverty during this time frame.

In world history, I would provide this as a primary source for my students and conduct a close reading activity. The goal would be to highlight income disparity during this time frame which ultimately was a contributing factor to the Great Depression.
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7/26/2016 8:50:30 AM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: Bwana Mickey
Interesting reading on something that American children would be very familiar with Disneyland and its interpretation in Japan. The Japanese have a unique way of incorporating something foreign and making it their own.
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7/26/2016 8:58:36 AM

gmora
gmora
Posts: 23
Subject: Chinese Soldiers During the American Civil War
I was surprised to read about Chinese participating as soldiers in the civil war. I think this is a great aspect of history that should be included in lesson plans regarding the civil war. However, I am not surprised to read about the mistreatment of soldiers. The U.S. has a history of reneging on its obligations to its soldiers (most notable after WWI - bonus army protest). In the 40s and 50s it was mistreatment of minority soldiers during and after WWII. In our modern time frame we have witnessed the lack of medical services provided to soldiers dealing with PTSD and other war related disabilities by VA hospitals.
edited by gmora on 7/26/2016
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7/26/2016 9:13:10 AM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject:
It is not too shocking that the Chinese soldier was not allowed land because he was not a citizen even though he fought in the war and was supposed to have been given citizenship. This is not unlike what also happened to black and Hispanic Americans after WWII.
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7/26/2016 12:58:56 PM

cindyn
cindyn
Posts: 33
Subject: Chinese
I find it sad that this story is not uncommon. Many minorities have fought in wars and received recognition for their bravery and heroics but faced discrimination and racism by the very same people they were fighting for. These men and women are the forgotten ones. Ones who are left out of textbooks and sadly in our lectures. I will hopefully be able to change this practice with stories like this and others that give a voice for "non citizens".
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7/26/2016 1:09:17 PM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: Bwana Mickey
This read was definitely an interesting one. Even though Japanese society, especially youth, enjoy most things that are "American." Disney, being one of the most successful imports, has taken over so many areas of Japanese life including entertainment and fashion. Many Japanese know Disney characters like Mickey Mouse and Lilo & Stitch and also make Disney part of their everyday fashion, including eyewear. However, even these characters, just like Tokyo Disneyland have a dual identity. Even though they developed in the US, they have evolved to also become uniquely Japanese. As the article states, "...Japanese owners wanted an exact copy and think of it as an exact copy...Ultimately, it is the Japanese, not the Americans, who have defined Tokyo Disneyland." In order for any western corporation/company to work, in my opinion, in Japan they must be willing to adapt to the different consumer needs. Tokyo Disneyland, Universal Studios Japan, and even Coco's Restaurants have done a good job of adapting which has led to their success in Japan.
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7/26/2016 1:16:50 PM

cindyn
cindyn
Posts: 33
Subject: Strange Customs
This article is an easy read and would be a great resource for students to analyze. I would introduce this article early in the semester when students are not so overwhelmed with historical information. The main purpose of the activity is to look through the eyes of a foreigner and see their perspective of American culture. Many of my ELD students would be interested in this story too since its very similar to their own experiences coming to America.
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7/26/2016 1:46:40 PM

cindyn
cindyn
Posts: 33
Subject: Diary of a Voyage Aboard
To add on to my previous comment, this article can also used in the classroom. It gives a difference perspective from the typical commentaries or stories in the school textbook. I would only select certain diary entry for my students since I want to to be engaged and to keep it simple. I really like the part where he meets the president and was shocked at the lack of ceremonial rituals in receiving an important document. This could be really interesting topic for a class discussion because many of my students experienced similar culture shock when they arrived in America.
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7/26/2016 1:48:54 PM

rmcgill
rmcgill
Posts: 7
Subject:
I am perplexed that so many Chinese people are immigrating to the U.S. with enough money to make cash purchases of homes. How did so many people coming from a classless Marxists communist country acquire as so much money? Has all this money been recently acquired wealth resulting from China's embrace of capitalism or was there previously existing wealthy class of people within the Chinese communist society.
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7/26/2016 1:57:41 PM

rmcgill
rmcgill
Posts: 7
Subject:
Although China has undergone an economic transformation in the post-Maoist era of the past 35 years, it remains a socialist country, and I would like to know something about the Chinese tax system and wealth distribution to provide safety nets for the poor.
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