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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Dube - East Asia and the West (Tuesday)

Movement in East Asia
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7/26/2016 2:21:21 PM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: Chinese Investments
If so many Chinese investors are coming into areas like Southern California and purchasing homes in cash, driving prices up, and creating issues for homebuyers here in California, is there anything that they state/city governments can do to curb this trend? I understand that "money talks" but it seems so unfair for homebuyers here. It feels as if areas like Arcadia, San Marino, and South Pasadena are being inundated by Chinese investors who are buying in bulk and driving first time homebuyers further out of the city and serving as an obstacle for growth.

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/29/business/international/chinese-cash-floods-us-real-estate-market.html?_r=0
edited by mhagiwara on 7/26/2016
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7/26/2016 2:22:49 PM

kluna
kluna
Posts: 82
Subject:
I think it is interesting that Clay stated that the United States and China are the 2 most economically divided countries in the world. While I was in China, I tried to understand and identify any remanence of communist ideologies but it was hard for me to see the differences from the U.S. I saw poverty as well as wealth there in all three of the cities I visited. One of the nights, I went to a street where the locals eat, and the image that comes to my mind when I think about this place is people begging on the street and a lady cleaning the restaurant dishes in buckets on the street, next to a BMW with flashy lights. I am wondering how what people and the government identify as noteworthy markers of communism in China, considering that these two nations with opposing economic ideologies have the same outcomes.
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7/26/2016 2:25:25 PM

rmcgill
rmcgill
Posts: 7
Subject:
It sounds to me like a new wealthy class is emerging in China that is connected to the Chinese Communist Party which could emerge as the same sort of elitist that have inspired revolutions in the past if wealth distribution is not equitable enough to provide adequate safety nets for the larger population.
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7/26/2016 2:35:19 PM

cindyn
cindyn
Posts: 33
Subject: Autobiography
I really liked this article because it compares two distinctive cultures during the early 1900s. Norimasa was very descriptive in his observation of American customs and how it differs from his own. There's a part that Norimasa explained his incident with a cigarette and his sleeve. I was able to relate to this part because I myself am a smoker, who visited Japan and was at a lost of the smoker culture. It took me at least a few hours and a trip to Daiso, to assimilate into Japanese smoking community.
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7/26/2016 2:49:17 PM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Chinese Trade and Investment
Chinese Investment in the US
In viewing the map showing investments of the Chinese worldwide I was surprised to see the lack of investment by China in the United States in comparison to Africa, the Middle East, and other parts of Asia.
Why is it that the US is behind in Chinese investment?
Why are the Chinese investing in US housing? Is the mortgage crisis to blame for the interest in housing?

In viewing the Charts uploaded for the World Trade Center, it is surprising to see that China is #13 for investments in California. China falls behind countries like Japan, Germany, France, and Britain.
Again, why is that?

Trade: Containers
http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-21432226
I was also interested in the talk about the limitations of the ship sizes coming through the Panama Canal. Apparently according the news article above from the BBC, it’s been 25 years since the Panama Canal became too small with ships carrying 4300 containers. The ships today, including the ones being constructed hold between 16,000 and upwards of 18,000 containers.
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7/26/2016 3:06:16 PM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: Chinese in the Civil War
Throughout our studies we were taught that the American Civil War was fought between the north and south with white and black soldiers. It seemed hard enough to get people to understand that there were African Americans who fought in the war (e.g., 54th Mass.), now we must not forget the sacrifices made by the Chinese who also fought. If/when I teach about the Civil War I will no longer just talk about the Chinese community as being based on the West coast mining for gold and opening shops for the miners. I must also introduce to the students the fact that several Chinese fought in the war itself, giving their lives for a war that did not necessarily impact them.
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7/26/2016 3:29:08 PM

cgonzalez
cgonzalez
Posts: 59
Subject:
Wood block prints influenced many great painters in the Western world like Monet and Van Gogh. It's interesting to see how the influence of Japanese culture around the started in the 1800's.
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7/26/2016 3:43:05 PM

kluna
kluna
Posts: 82
Subject:
Clay mentioned that there were satellite towns outside of Shanghai that were themed according to Western cities. This is amazing to me! I think the interest in the West is a bit strange, but I guess this is the effects of imperialism. I wonder who can afford to live in these satellite cities and how they are advertised in China? Who is investing in the creation of these cities and what is their vision? I also wonder how many foreigners from the original cities visit these places and how they feel about these satellite cities? If you are interested in a visual tour, here’s a link: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/14/fake-english-town-in-china_n_3907820.html
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7/26/2016 5:00:29 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
Tokyo Disneyland has been a great success. Shanghai Disneyland just opened for business a month ago. I haven't gotten a chance to visit it yet, but I heard people had complained on the long waiting lines for each game by internet and newspapers. Chinese are obsessed with American cultures too. In cities of China, you can see McDonalds, KFC, Papa John's, Starbucks , 7 eleven everywhere. Young generations like to watch American TV shows and buy American brands, such Nike, Adidas, Apple. I think American culture is still the dominant culture in the world. I believe it would be fun to ask students to find American brands in the photos shot in China and figure out the Chinese names of those brands by themselves.
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7/26/2016 5:26:06 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject: Arcadia - AKA "Chinese Beverly Hills" or "Mistress city"
These are some interesting articles in regard to the city:
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-cm-arcadia-immigration-architecture-20140511-story.html
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-12-05/welcome-arcadia-ca-chinese-billionaires-mistress-city
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7/26/2016 5:54:18 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject:
This was a fascinating read. I had no idea how the Chinese in America participated in the Civil War prior to reading this. Their treatment afterward was an unfortunate precursor to the way many Japanese Americans were treated during and after WWII, despite service. This article totally sparked my interest in learning more about ethnic Asian people's participation in historic events in the history of the U.S. I would challenge my students to take on mini-research projects about these sort of stories. Also, I wonder about whether there are stories of westerners who played roles in historic Asian events, but not necessarily as representatives of their native countries but rather participants on the same level as the locals (of a given Asian country).
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7/26/2016 6:52:59 PM

juanae
juanae
Posts: 57
Subject:
Today's presentation on the origins of Japanese food, was really interesting. Especially the argument about that tempura was brought by the Portuguese in the 1500s. Also, I was made aware that not all Japanese ate rice, I thought it was common practice all over Asia.
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7/26/2016 6:58:00 PM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: Power and Threat of America -
Very interesting article about Liang, China's first modern intellectual regarding his visiting of turn of the century America. Interesting observation that our national federal republic would not work in China because of its lack of spirited civic representation at the local level. In reflection perhaps the communist party has brought this component to the China in that generations have now participated in local party politics albeit in a one party system. Also interesting observations of the negative influences of the large business trusts exiting at the time. He also noted that the founding fathers were a small group of individuals that had imposed their vision and created a government that would continue on after them implementing their vision for the future. Telling that the observations of Liang were read by Mao and gave him a vision of a future for China with the possibility of looking outside of China for governmental options that had not been previously considered and were foreign. Liang also saw what he believed was a progression towards a stronger central government. China seems comfortable with a strong central government in a way that instinctively makes Americans feel uncomfortable. An authoritarian central government in China seems even today to be a guarantor of stability and continued prosperity whereas in America it is seen as a continual threat to personal freedom and its potential opportunities afforded to the individual. Interesting observations.
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7/26/2016 7:05:04 PM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: Banwa Mickey
Great article that can be used to get students to read a perspective about something that they are very familiar with (Disneyland) and its interpretation by Japan as it constructs its version of Disneyland. One could find similar articles about Disneyland China and EuroDisney in Paris. Great idea to organize that park in a way that lets the visitor feel as it they are growing with the nation (United States) from East to West i.e. stopping in New Orleans square for some civilization before moving on to Pioneerland and then completing with achieving your dreams in Futureland. One could make an analogy between this layout and a 5th grade social studies curriculum on US history.
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7/26/2016 7:16:11 PM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: Diary of a voyage abroad
Interesting observations of one of Japans first envoys to the United States in 1860 soon after Commodore Perry's arrival in Japan. Interesting observations about the attendance of women and lack of formal protocol. Observations that there appears to be a lack of class stratification from his point of view. He seems to implicitly state that he knows there is a great interest in Japan. Americans seem genuinely interested in the exotic nature of the culture.I
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7/26/2016 7:51:49 PM


Guest
Subject:
I feel like I don't really know U.S. or Civil War after reading the article by Stuart Heaven. I taught this topic last year, and there was no mention in the book or any other texts that I used with my students. One thing I did know was about Chinese and the Gold Rush, but had absolutely no idea that Chinese men had served in the war between the statesame and that th hey faced discrimination just like former slavestudent soldiers. This was definitely an eye opener for me. I want to research this topic further more.
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7/26/2016 7:57:34 PM

juanae
juanae
Posts: 57
Subject:
Profesor Dube's presentation , was really interesting. I had no idea that influence of Asia on Mexico's fashion. The Japanese's Virginia of Guadalupe frame was revealing regarding the movement of Asian'so goods and ideas.
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7/26/2016 8:12:15 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject: From the autobiography of Yukichi...
Yukichi Fukuzawa's description of his introduction to America was vivid and an easy read. I was struck by how hospitable and accommodating the American hosts were in trying not to force their guests to be a certain way or adapt too quickly to American customs, including food. There was a thoughtfulness described that I feel our culture sometimes lacks today. However, there was also an assumption made, I believe, by the Americans that Yukichi (and presumably his Samurai peers) were simpletons and uneducated. The "fish out of water" analogy so clearly applies; it would be easy to segue this into a lesson for middle or high school students to try to think of a time when they felt similar to Yukichi I would assume. Primary sources are great!
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7/26/2016 9:29:05 PM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: What surprised me at the most.
I always wondered why Americans adore Japanese culture and goods despite the traumatic relationship during the WWII. After Pf. Dube's lecture in the afternoon, I could see how deeply Asian culture had rooted in the Western societies including the US, especially Japanese culture. When I heard what Benjamin Franklin said about China and how obsessed he was with China, a question came up. When did the West begin looking down on Asia? I vividly remember what Weber said about the "Asian Value" in his book, 'Protestantism....'. Also, how about racism towards Asians? When did they begin to look at Asia as backwards states?
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7/26/2016 9:51:23 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject:
I also want to learn more about Mexico's role in the history of the Pacific Rim. So interesting!
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