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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Dube - East Asia and the West (Tuesday)

Movement in East Asia
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7/26/2016 10:11:44 PM

jschilp
jschilp
Posts: 24
Subject: Disney Japan
I've never been a big Disney person - in fact, I despise their greed and price gouging practices that exclude many who simply cannot afford it - and this article certainly didn't help. The exclusion of Korea from their history is a slap in the face and the way they depict certain other pieces of history, WWII for instance, leaves a lot to be desired. I understand the need to keep an amusement park light but the 30 seconds of darkness when the issue comes up is odd. It's worse than the non-mention of Korea. It's basically like the corporation and the country shutting their eyes to the truth - that they did some pretty ugly things to China - their benefactor - and Korea who they seem afraid to mention.
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7/26/2016 10:15:21 PM

jschilp
jschilp
Posts: 24
Subject: Food presentation
Our guest speaker Sam (I think) was fantastic this morning. So much knowledge I never had any idea of. I've enjoyed Japanese cuisine for so long and am grateful to learn so much of the history. The soy sauce & rice that I had just assumed were always staples of their diet not seems so naive of me. Now when I take my wife for our anniversary to get sushi, I'll understand the food, culture, and history so much more that it'll make the experience deeper.
Thank you!!!
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7/26/2016 10:20:00 PM

jschilp
jschilp
Posts: 24
Subject: Afternoon session
Being an avid fan of Henry David Thoreau, I knew the great impact of literature of India on the transcendentalists and how similar many of his ideas are to the Tao but I never made a connection to our Founding Fathers and Asia. Ben Franklin being my favorite of the bunch, I'm even more impressed now that I know he poured over whatever he could of the philosophies of the East. I just wish there was more appreciation and praise for the values that came from there.
As far as incorporating these ideas into my classroom, I'm going to draw more connections from Confucius and Lao Tzu to Jefferson and Franklin. I'll share this with the history teacher next door to me & see if he can blend it into his curriculum as well when he gets to that part of American history.
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7/26/2016 10:30:43 PM

jschilp
jschilp
Posts: 24
Subject: Strange Customs
BIG fan of this piece! The writing is so fluid and casual I feel like he's talking to me. I'm bringing this to my students to give them a taste of what conversational writing should be. His opening piece on Oakland is brilliant and full of imagery & sensory detail. It's exactly what I want my students to be able to accomplish. If I can get more of his work, I'd appreciate it!
Ok, so after reading the footnote by the congressman who wrote in reaction to Zhang's visit, it's interesting to note the differences in attitude between these two men. One who appreciates the world at large and the other who looks down on anything not American. I guess, in response to a post I read by one of our classmates, that's where you can see the start of the loathing of China. To think this politician could possibly scoff at the thousands of years of ebb & flow of civilization & the contributions to humanity at large is appalling, especially since it came at a time when America was reeling from the effects of the Civil War, Lincoln's assassination, and the terrible way former slaves were treated once freed. It seems politicians love to gloss over the messes & negatives back then as much as now...
edited by jschilp on 7/26/2016
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7/26/2016 11:43:05 PM

nminassian
nminassian
Posts: 23
Subject: The Chinese soldiers who fought in the American civil war
The article was written by Stuart Heaver, and I'm so glad I read it. Even 150 years later not everyone knows about Chinese soldiers role in Battle of Gettysburg. It is unfair to pick and choose of how much history our students will learn. Only after reading this article I learned about Corporal Joseph Pierce's history. The same situation was in Armenian history textbooks. I grew up glorifying Lenin, and not even once the name of Stalin was mentioned... Who gets to decide what will be typed in those books? Do they have a right to hold back the truth from a whole generation?
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7/26/2016 11:53:51 PM

nminassian
nminassian
Posts: 23
Subject: Disneyland in Japan
I don't like Disneyland. I think its an extremely expensive and totally fake place... In my opinion Japan has so many unique experiences to offer, that adopting Disneyland idea was totally unnecessary.
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7/27/2016 12:28:08 AM

nminassian
nminassian
Posts: 23
Subject: chinese millennials
I found the information about Chinese younger generation very interesting. As a teacher I can see how their (Asian students') hard work and constantly being pressured to be successful, proves to make them excellent students. To some point I agree that kids have to be pushed by their parents. Most of the time it is better to have children in some kind of educational/learning center than letting them play video games 24/7, watch TV, or get in trouble in the streets.
I greatly enjoyed today's debate (socialist vs. capitalist, extreme poor vs. extreme rich, etc.) Every topic was very informative, exciting and will be discussed in my classroom. Being able to compare Columbus's view of the world to Jesuits' map, and learning about Matteo Ricci was interesting as well.
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7/27/2016 1:55:22 AM

yreynoso
yreynoso
Posts: 23
Subject: Article: Chinese Soldiers who Fought in the American Civil War by Stuart Heaver
It saddens me to learn that many brave Chinese young men were fighting in the Civil war and were not acknowledged properly in history. When teaching about historical events such as the Battle of Gettysburg, I will make sure my students will find information about the more than "50 Chinese combatants" who participated in the Gettysburg battle, and who according to historians, these individuals were "rewarded with exclusion and racial discriminated after the war ended". In addition to that, they were not compensated and had to accept miserable wages in order to survive.
A great project for my students will be the creation of biographical posters where students will display historical data about Joseph Pierce, Thomas Sylvanus, Ah Yee Way, John Tommy, an many others Chinese individuals who participated in the Civil war and performed heroic actions as young soldiers. Students will investigate, research, and present relevant information that will promote historical and civic awareness about this period in history.
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7/27/2016 8:47:13 AM

yreynoso
yreynoso
Posts: 23
Subject: Chinese in the Civil War
I agree with the fact that Chinese individuals were neglected from the list of American heroes. Although the article mentions that some were recognized where the war ended, later on were completely left out and discriminated against by the American people and even their military peers. The government did not do much for them when they needed to reintegrate to society. I wonder why the history does not show justice for these men who fought so hard fro a country that now despise them.
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7/27/2016 4:56:23 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Subject: china's tax system
One place to begin is Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taxation_in_China

The accounting firm PwC has this guide to taxation in China: http://www.pwccn.com/webmedia/doc/635671281131435071_cn_tax_facts_figures_2015.pdf
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7/27/2016 6:47:20 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject: Chinese history(5000 years?)
Dear Clay,

Per our conversation, I look up the topic in Chinese sources. If the origin of Chinese history is based on Huangdi, then it should be around 3500 years. The 5000 years figure that I have been taught turns out to trace back to the sanxingdui(三星堆) artifacts, which I have never heard of until now. Thanks for bringing this to my attention.
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7/30/2016 12:13:28 PM

mmadruga
mmadruga
Posts: 23
Subject:
The game of weiqi (围棋), perhaps the coolest and easiest of classroom applications. I will learn this game, buy a board, and expose the strategies to my learners. I love thinking games. Chess/Go Club?
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7/30/2016 12:33:25 PM

mmadruga
mmadruga
Posts: 23
Subject: Disneyland
I agree Disneyland is fake, reflecting the social values of instant gratification at any cost. It is sad that society is trending on a narcissistic hedonistic path; with no regard for the past or the future. However, it appears the the millennials are the hope for the future as they as they are more globally connect than past generations.
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8/3/2016 3:04:17 PM

njimenez
njimenez
Posts: 58
Subject: Response to East Asia & The West Trade
During the lecture it was not surprising that the Chinese did not trust any outsiders. Therefore, to own anything from that country was seen as a luxury items. When the class was speaking about other countries being fascinated with China and making knockoffs items, I immediately thought of how many knockoff items are made today. I was looking at the blue and white porcelain made by Garcia Hurtado and it made me considered a lesson on Chinaware porcelain knockoff. I was thinking of possibly having students create their own chinaware by using disposable plates and watercolor paint and markers. I was thinking as a hook we can talk about all the knockoffs we purchase today. Maybe look at how many trendy items are copied and made to look like the real thing in today’s society. Then we can talk about how Chinaware was originally made and many began to get inspired and create their own designs based on knockoffs. Artists in general are always getting inspired by each other I thought this would be a good lesson to consider. Students would also gain a bit of history by having to learn about the trade of China.
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8/3/2016 3:33:59 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Asian trade and Latin America
  • Professor Dube brought a lot of points that I would like bring in to my Spanish class. For example, he mentioned that during the Ming Dynasty, silver extracted from Mexican mines. I am very interested to make connections between Asia and Latin America and Spain, and it seems international trade and economics seem to be a good jump off point. As I was looking at the porcelain in the slides, I noticed that a lot of it is similar to talavera, a porcelain ware that is produced in central Mexico, most notably in Mexico City and Puebla. It would be a great research project for my students to investigate how porcelain made its way to Mexico and how pottery designs from China influenced talavera styles.

edited by nramon on 8/3/2016
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8/3/2016 3:49:07 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Response to GMora Chinese soldiers during the Civil War
  • I was also surprised to learn about the role of Chinese soldiers and it really highlights the disparity of what is included and what is left out in our textbooks. When I teach the Mexican-American war, I always include the San Patricio brigade. This was a brigade of Irish soldiers who defected to the Mexican side because of the discrimination they faced on the US side. I think it would be fascinating to include the accounts of these two ethnic groups and many more who participated in American wars as a way to study prejudice in American society throughout time.

edited by nramon on 8/3/2016
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8/3/2016 3:58:26 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Response to MHagiwara on Bwana Mickey
I am also fascinated by how the Japanese take many imports from other countries and make them uniquely their own. The same can be said about how Americans take Japanese culture and make it their own. For instance, when thinking about sushi, we created the California Roll and added or own twist to fit the palate of Americans. While I was in Japan this summer, I had the opportunity to go to a baseball game and I am so glad I did because it was fascinating to see how baseball has taken on a life of its own in a very Japanese way. After experiencing the very coordinated cheers, and the more active role spectators take when watching the game, I came to the conclusion that going to Japanese baseball games is far more entertaining than going to baseball games here in the US and also a very special cultural experience that reflects the values and practices of Japan.
edited by nramon on 8/3/2016
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8/3/2016 4:17:47 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Response to RMcgill
  • I think you raise a lot of important questions that a lot of people must have on the rapidly changing economic landscape and power of China. Perhaps it might be helpful to adopt a more expansive view of China’s economic history in order to better contextualize the why and how of China’s recent developments. As Americans, I feel like we often fall into patterns of looking at China from a Cold War perspective and we think of Chairman Mao as a very crucial, which I will not argue with, he is. However, in placing so much emphasis on Mao’s China, I think we run the risk of forgetting to think of the rest of China’s history. Mao is but one figure in what is a very expansive history that spans thousands of years. In the past, China has had very capitalistic patterns and it is very important to keep this in mind. It would probably also be very helpful to think of communism as both a political and economic system. Are both mutually exclusive? In looking at China, it seems they are not since politically they are a communist country, but not so much economically.

edited by nramon on 8/3/2016
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8/11/2016 5:13:37 PM

juanae
juanae
Posts: 57
Subject:
I'm currently working on my 3 curriculum lessons. So far my favorite is the topic on CHinese on the Civil War. Yesterday, I was talking to one of my colleagues at Muir MS, and they had not hear about it before. I can't wait for next semester, so I can present my lesson to my students.
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8/30/2016 10:19:41 PM

victoriachan
victoriachan
Posts: 27
Subject: Chinese people in the Civil War
The article brought up the fact that the dominant narrative about the Chinese diaspora in the U.S. is often focused on the western states, specifically California. Most people in California know about how Chinese people settled in San Francisco after going through Angel Island and had been motivated to come because of the California Gold Rush. As a result, it’s surprising to find out that there were Chinese people on the East Coast during the Civil War, let alone find out that Chinese people fought in the war. I had never even thought of it as a possibility. But after reading the article, I can see how the seafarers in the article potentially kidnapped or bought these children and brought them over to the East Coast.

However, it is saddening to find out that because there weren’t a large number of Chinese people fighting in the Civil War, many people disregard the figures. Moreover, they faced discrimination and xenophobia despite having fought in the Civil War. I am curious about the reasons for why they decided to fight in the war; or perhaps they were coerced into it. I imagine they did it because they viewed the U.S. as their home and should therefore be protected, but I would like some more concrete details to support this thought.
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