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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Hoskins - The Vietnamese Faith (Thur)

Movement in East Asia
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7/22/2016 1:08:03 PM

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 152
Subject: Caodai: The Creation and Spread of a Vietnamese Faith
Please download and read the attached documents.

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7/27/2016 10:38:11 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: Caodai
Caidai, to me, is a kind of eclecticism that's seen in so many aspects of Vietnamese life. Looking forward to the presentation from Janet Hoskins...and I'll try to be early. Going to leave by 7 this time
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7/28/2016 5:56:38 AM

mmadruga
mmadruga
Posts: 23
Subject:
Caodism is extremely interesting! The religion of tolerance and inclusion trumps the standard typical religious belief that "if you are not with us, then you are against us". I am sure that some are not happy that Jesus and Mohammed are located on the 3rd level below Confucius and Buddha, but at least there included. Absorb rather that reject, peace rather than war. Most wars start on Sunday?
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7/28/2016 8:41:09 AM

gmora
gmora
Posts: 23
Subject: Cadai
This is the first time I am hearing about Cadai. I think that it is very interesting the way this religion blends its foundational religious practices with Western practices. The historical context of foreign imperialism is also important and should not be left out of the conversation. The religion was created as an attempt, by Vietnamese, to ensure the preservation of their cultural practices while making accomodations due Western pressure. However, all religions experience syncretism in order to have the initial buy in by the local populace. Islam, Catholicism, Christianity, Buddhism, Hinduism are not pure religions and all have influences from regional/local belief systems.

In a lesson plan, students could analyze syncretic elements of Asian religions. It would also be important to understand the context of the syncretism.
edited by gmora on 8/1/2016
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7/28/2016 9:10:13 AM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject: An unjealous God
Very interesting reading about Caodaism coming from Vietnam. Interesting incorporation of the french colonial catholic mission to local religion traditions and needs of the time. I wonder how this take on Christianity will continue to grow out from the Vietnamese diaspora in California and other areas where those from Vietnam have settled.
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7/28/2016 12:07:40 PM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Indigenous Religions in Vietnam: Caodaism
I cannot say that I had any clue what Caodaism was prior to reading the article written by Janet Hoskins. From my understanding of the article, the religion is honoring both European and Asian religious practices. It seems to be a mixing of and mutual respect for Roman Catholicism and Asian religions such as, Taoism, Buddhism, and Confucianism. It is interesting that the religion gained popularity as an anti-colonial movement, but still gives respect to European religious practices. More shocking to me was that there was about 20-25% of the population that converted to this religious practice in South Vietnam during the period of 1930-1975.

Questions:
I am very confused by this religion. Is Caodaism a modern religion? Why did it gain popularity in a modern time period?
If some of these religions that Caodaism builds on are not missionary religions how can people who practice Caodaism desire to spread the religion globally? Also...does this religion seem to contradict itself in its beliefs or do all these contradicting beliefs work together somehow?
edited by skroop on 7/28/2016
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7/28/2016 1:20:43 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: Dr. Hoskins
I agree with Dr. Hoskins, the official governement statistics on religion does not reflect the actual practice of Vietnamese people. As Dr. Hoskins said, their affiliations will typically become more evident during life changing events e.g. death.
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7/28/2016 1:38:09 PM

cindyn
cindyn
Posts: 33
Subject: Caodaism
Being Vietnamese-American, I thought I knew a good amount about the Vietnamese culture and community. I was sorely wrong. Caodai has never even crossed my radar even though I am Vietnamese and live in the largest community of Vietnamese outside of Vietnam. I guess you can say I practice Caodai at home because my family pays homage to our ancestors and we frequent the Buddhist temples???
After seeing visuals of Caodai temples, I have seen many of these temples in Vietnam but I always thought those we just Buddhist temples. I think I can use my own confusion about religion with my students. I want to be able to compare things my students know and things they would never even considered.
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7/28/2016 1:44:54 PM

cgonzalez
cgonzalez
Posts: 59
Subject: Caodaism
This religion is so welcoming and not trying to start problems with other religions. I really thing that their belief of worshiping the left eye was an interesting fact, which focus on morality and ethics, as opposed to the right eye, which focus on the intelligence and rationale of the individual. That seems to make sense with the religion given that they are so pacifist. It would be very interesting to compare and contrast this religion with Buddahism in the classroom.
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7/28/2016 1:46:47 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
First time heard of Caodaism. It is good to know that Sun Yat-sen was one of the three prophet of it. The statues of Caodaism look like those from Daoism.
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7/28/2016 1:52:55 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1921
Subject: a 2004 look at vietnam, including caodai
I've only visited Vietnam once, in 2004. I subsequently put together the attached presentation for my UCLA students. The visit included a trip to the Caodai home temple. Janet's presentation is far more detailed and recent. She's an expert. Still, perhaps you'll find this more general look of use. The last several slides were from the Caodai visit.
edited by Clay Dube on 7/28/2016

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7/28/2016 1:56:21 PM

mmadruga
mmadruga
Posts: 23
Subject:
last night was the first time that I was exposed to Caodaism. I really like how it is an inclusive religion. Integrating the sacred people of other religions, and including people like poets and political leaders including George Washington?
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7/28/2016 2:14:16 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
It is quite interesting to find that Caodaism combines Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Catholicism. The seven figures in the picture the professor showed to us consists of 6 Chinese figures and 1 western figure. As I have some students from Vietnam, I think it would be a good idea to use this picture as an opening for the unit of introduction to Chinese religions.
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7/28/2016 2:20:58 PM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: Debate
I feel that a good high school debate/discussion to have regarding Caodai would be the question, "Is Caodai a religion just as Christianity and Islam is considered a religion?" When discussing a religion like Christianity and/or Islam one can argue their legitimacy, for lack of a better word, through figures like Jesus Christ and the Prophet Muhummad and their roles in the development of their respective religions. However, when discussing Caodai you have a variety of saints and figures like Sun Yat Sen, Victor Hugo, Julius Cesar, and of course Jesus Christ and Muhammad. With proper scaffolding and explanations of the history of this Vietnamese religion, a student-led discussion (Philosophical Chairs/Socratic Seminar) could be a great way to culminate the lesson.
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7/28/2016 2:33:23 PM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Reflection: Vietnamese Faith
In the beginning of Janet Hoskins presentation on Vietnam’s religions, I felt the changes in percentages for Caodaism was surprising. According to the article on Vietnam’s Indigenous Religions, Caodaism was practiced by 20%-25% of the population leading up to 1975, in 2009 that number was 1% of the population, and in 2014 that number went back up closer to 5%. What accounts for this more recent change? I get that communism has since 1975 pushed Caodaism out of the country to some degree in closing temples.
Are the practices of counting the number of people who practice these religions accurate, or are mistakes being made? I can understand the idea that many people may choose not to answer the question in regards to religion when putting this on a government issued ID due to reasons of discrimination in finding a job.


Also I really enjoyed the pictures of the Caodai temples. The symbolism in the colors and imagery used in the decoration of the temples is something that I would like to know more about.
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7/28/2016 2:48:28 PM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: Religious Persecution
Professor Hoskins' lecture about Caodai made me question how practitioners of the religion were being treated by society in Vietnam and I came upon a very interesting article about religious persecution by the Vietnamese government not only on those of the Caodai faith, but all faiths within Vietnam.

http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/598710-religious-persecution-in-vietnam-government-spies-forced-renunciations-of-faith/
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7/28/2016 2:55:27 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
I like your idea! To be honest, it is hard for me to consider Caodaism as a religion.
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7/28/2016 3:01:41 PM

cindyn
cindyn
Posts: 33
Subject: Caodaism in Garden Grove
Caodai is a mixture of multiple religions and beliefs. In one of the slides, there was a carving of religious figures and many of those figures I recognize from Chinese movies. I wonder if there is a community of Caodaists in China and how it similar or different to the Vietnamese version. There was a part of the lecture that I was confused by, "Is there are almost no members of the communist party who are Caodaists"? After this lecture, I going to try and visit the Caodai temple in Orange County to learn more of this religion and it's close to my house.
I think an interesting assignment for students would be to visit/research a religion that they dont have any previous knowledge about and then have them present it to the class.
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7/28/2016 3:50:00 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: Dao Mau
Prof. Hoskins gives an outstanding explanation and analysis of the two very obscured religious practices in Vietnam, Cao Dai and "mother goddess" worship. Her narrative of the videos she shot was fascinating and informative. Equally interesting was that the videos were shot in Southern California. I was surprised to find out that Dao Mau rituals were occuring, in Orange County. Prof. Hoskins offers great resource to teach about personal identity and life aspirations.
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7/28/2016 5:30:27 PM

mmadruga
mmadruga
Posts: 23
Subject:
Who really knows what another individual believes and/or does not believe? If someone does believe, that belief could change. Dr. Meeks articulated that the individual self is dynamic, and constantly fluctuating. The tolerance of Caodaism gives the follower options to adjust as ones beliefs change, whereas most other religions adhere to a strict set of doctrines. Professor Hoskins presentation was enlightening for me, and I plan on visiting a temple soon.
edited by mmadruga on 7/28/2016
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