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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Hoskins - The Vietnamese Faith (Thur)

Movement in East Asia
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7/28/2016 6:39:08 PM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: Inclusion and fusion
The new religions which rose from the late 19th century to the 20th century are very interesting and different than traditional religions. They seem more inclusive and open-minded. For me, Caodaism looks still strange, yet it makes me more curious about it. I am personally interested in Garden Grove area, and I might meet who are Caodaists in my classroom.
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7/28/2016 6:42:20 PM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: Don't feel bad about it
I grew up in Korea and barely moved to the States, but I have been surprised by Pf. Jung-Kim's lecture about Korean Wave. I still don't know why K-XXX are popular in Asia. I think we tend not to pay attention to what we are used to see.
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7/28/2016 8:22:20 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject:
At first, I was surprise by the low percentage of people who indicated themselves as Buddhist until Prof. Hoskins explained how the data was recorded. As a little kid in Vietnam, I have seen DaoDai temples and thought they were the same as other Buddhist temples, just more colorful. This is the first time I have heard of both of these religion. It just goes to show how ignorant I've been. This has been an enlightening week!
edited by hlien on 7/28/2016
edited by hlien on 7/28/2016
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7/28/2016 9:22:15 PM

gtyau
gtyau
Posts: 20
Subject: Philosophy vs. Religion
Tagging on, I feel that the potential for debate/discussion/research/presentation with regards to religion and philosophy is somewhat limitless for all students really. Especially in light of what we learned about indigenous Vietnamese religion today. Dao Mao and Caodai each present so much to share and discuss, especially Caodai with its reverence for Victor Hugo and how it seems to try and incorporate a bit of everything! There's a part of me that feels like it was purely a reactionary ideology for the purposes of survival. I can almost imagine once you are part of a Caodai temple, you finally get access to the "real" church behind a false paneled wall, like a speakeasy during prohibition (I mean that with no disrespect). I say that because of how oppressive it must feel to be part of a culture that is perpetually in civil war or occupied by a foreign government, or both, for so long. The diaspora of Vietnamese who are practicing Caodai is incredible; it seems more popular outside of Vietnam for sure, but I wonder how many underground Caodai temples there are in Vietnam (hidden in side Catholic Churches perhaps). While it's far fetched, it's totally fun to think about. Victor Hugo...wow!
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7/28/2016 9:52:53 PM

nminassian
nminassian
Posts: 23
Subject: Vietnamese religions
I liked Proffesor Hoskins' presentation because it was extremely colorful, different from anything I know, and to some point little silly. I had no idea that the Vietnamese religion is such a bouquet of variety of cultures, colors, rituals. Although their costumes, decorations, and rituals look very interesting, I don't think I would ever ask them to predict my future. The whole process looked more like a festival entertainment than a religion. In my classroom the most I probably would do is creating paper decorations of lotus flower, or a serpent.
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7/29/2016 9:37:56 PM

cgonzalez
cgonzalez
Posts: 59
Subject:
The second part of Dr. Meeks presentation really showed how religion can be transformed from one place to another. As we saw vietnamese religion tried to encompass many religions to recruit more members or to not leave anyone out...

I also noticed how in California the Vietnamese religion focused more on attaining "things" like a husband or a computer. It seemed to me that they focused more on these things due to the influence of the materialist culture in the USA. It would be interesting to compare and contrast the how they practiced the religion here in states as compared to that in Vietnam
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7/30/2016 10:02:01 AM

ysun
ysun
Posts: 21
Subject: Caodai
It is interesting to know about Caodai. I have so many friends that are Vietnamese; they always told me they are Buddhism. I knew their practice was different with the Buddhist in Taiwan, but I didn’t know maybe it may have something else to cause this difference.
edited by ysun on 7/30/2016
edited by ysun on 7/30/2016
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7/30/2016 10:17:03 AM

ysun
ysun
Posts: 21
Subject: Knowing Caodai
I was not clicked with this Caodaism to Taiwanese‘s yi-kwan-dao when I heard that from Dr. Hoskins. (She mentioned it) After a few days to figure out what I had learned from her… I finally realized, yes, it is so similar to the people in Taiwan who practice yi-kwan-dao.
Yi-Kwan-Dao means they combined different religions into one. They don’t eat meat, they obey many rules… I was invited to one of their event once, but I was not able to make it. If I went, I guess I am able to understand this much better.
One thing I learned from my yi-kwan-dao friends, they were all so nice and honesty. That make me have so many positive energy grow from these friends.
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7/31/2016 4:17:40 PM

aschleicher
aschleicher
Posts: 44
Subject: Seminar #8 Evaluation
Professor Janet Hoskins gave a presentation on the "indigenous" religions of Vietnam and how those religions moved to the U.S., the historical background, and the growing popularity of the religions in California. Statistics make it difficult to truly understand religion in Vietnam, especially the numbers related to indigenous religion mainly because of political correctness. Religion is identified on the Vietnamese ID card, and there are people who leave it blank, or put Buddhist even though they are not practicing Buddhists. Professor Hoskins says that the Communist Party in Vietnam currently allows religions to exist. Professor Hoskins academic focus is on the faith of Caodaism and Dao Mau.

Caodaism brings European religion and Asian religion together into one. Caodaism is practiced in California and the faithful are growing in numbers in the Southern California region. Dao Mau is also growing in popularity in the Southern California area, and it is more focused female divinities and its specific rituals are becoming more developed. The diaspora of the Vietnamese people allows for traditional local religions to spread, and to maintain a "connectedness" with the homeland on behalf of spiritual followers. It is not therefore, and export, but the religion connects the diaspora to their indigenous roots. An interesting take on Asian religious practices and how those practices move to other countries. This study could be part of a religion unit with specific focus on the movement of indigenous religions and the connection to the greater Los Angeles region.
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8/1/2016 9:46:49 PM

gmora
gmora
Posts: 23
Subject: Indegenous Faiths
I found Professor Hoskins presentation on indegenous religions interesting. Its seems there is a similarity between indegenours vietnamese beliefs and santaria. For example, both involve a priest or priestess who can call on spirits, both pay tribute through the creation of alters, and both seem to have small group worship (as opposed to larger congregation of catholic/christian churches.) Lastly both stem from indegenous cultures that have been transplanted great distances.
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8/12/2016 11:33:14 AM

jschilp
jschilp
Posts: 24
Subject:
This one was perhaps the most surprising. These "garage religions" (funny term) are quite involved and deep. The practitioners are quite devout and I was impressed that the "churches" are handed down to very specific individuals and those up & coming priests are ready for it. I was impressed with the way they took on the spirits that they were working through, like the women who smoked cigarettes to show they are males & other actions they took up to express age & social status.
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8/13/2016 4:51:16 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: Syncretism
Hoskins exploration of the "syncretism" of the cao dai religion is fascinating and really speaks to the the Vietnamese emphasis on pragmatism. One sits quietly in the face of the validity of all perspectives, understanding that knowledge itself is a construct and that so-called truth is infinitely more subtle. Yet faced with the reality of every day disjointed experiences, forces the practitioner to come up with practical rituals and symbols to address the psychological dilemmas that comes with modern existence. I would use this piece to inform my lesson planning around the rich symbolisms and themes found in eastern religions and traditions of a literary unit.
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8/17/2016 11:21:13 PM

jmallard
jmallard
Posts: 22
Subject: God is a jealous God
The Bible clearly states in Exodus 34:14 "For thou shalt worship no other god: for the LORD, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God." The perversion of all the different ideologies isn't new, but so many different allowances of beliefs rolled into one is definitely a unique organized religion. I think this could be a great lesson in the upper grades on a study of a variety of religions that the Cai dai embraces. Students could compare and contrast two the three of the religions that Cai dai embraces and do a presentation on their findings.
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8/25/2016 2:31:06 PM

rbrady
rbrady
Posts: 39
Subject:
Great lessons for High School as an example of the creation of a modern religion and its spreading from Vietnam to others areas. Students would be able to research and present on the nationalistic tendencies of the religion during the french colonial period coupled with influences from Masonic, Catholic, Buddhist, and Islamic traditions. The use of hybrid and new symbols and rituals could also be of interest. This is an interesting modern often overlooked example of how religions are created morphed and can travel globally.
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8/29/2016 7:29:40 PM

victoriachan
victoriachan
Posts: 27
Subject: Vietnam's Indigenous Religion: Caodai
I thought it was interesting that in Caodai, the LGBTQ community seems to be more accepted than in some of the other cultures/religions that are practiced in the U.S. In Caodai, a man can have female spirits inside him and a woman can be a vessel for a male spirit. It’s a much more nuanced way to think about gender/sexuality, especially since there’s so much homophobia in the U.S.
Parts of the elaborate rituals are reminiscent of Chinese culture, such as the dragon being present during ceremonies. It would make sense why anyone who is not familiar with Vietnamese culture might confuse the Caodai religion with Buddhism and label it as such.

Also, I see a parallel between how in both Vietnam and China, there have been times were religion was considered a waste of time by the government. Instead, the governments in both countries wanted to emphasize building the nation. Nonetheless, I do appreciate how Caodai has survived and continues to be practiced in both Vietnam and the U.S. despite this history.
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8/29/2016 7:52:02 PM

hlien
hlien
Posts: 20
Subject: Caodai
I find this to be an interesting fusion of the west and the east religions in Vietnam. In many ways, I find this to be a religion of convenience rather than a pure religion based on a certain ideological belief. It is like saying we are not sure who to worship, so let's just include everyone. But then on the other hand, one may see it as a religion of tolerance in which all are welcome and that there are many paths to the ultimate truth.
What I find the most intriguing is the order in which the Gods/Goddess are arranged. I am curious to know as to how each figure comes to be placed in the position in which it is currently resides and whether there is any significance in such position.
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8/31/2016 9:32:04 PM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject: Vietnamese Faith
I am not sure how I would use this in the classroom. Maybe comparing and contrasting different religions. Showing the similarities and differences of Asia religions.
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9/1/2016 12:14:39 PM

njimenez
njimenez
Posts: 58
Subject: Response to The Vietnamese Faith
Thank you for this presentation this was the first time I have ever even heard of this religion. Since I do not really understand it that well I don’t think that I would ever teach it in my classroom but it was interesting to see the videos. I might however, use the videos shown in class and the article provided as a resource to show diversity in religions in Asia. I like reading “What Are Vietnam’s Indigenous Religions”, helped me understand the religion better.

Profile of the Vietnamese spirt: http://dornsife.usc.edu/transnational-religion/spirit-profiles/" target="_blank" rel="nofollow">http://dornsife.usc.edu/transnational-religion/spirit-profiles/

Relationship of Syncretism vs. Diaspora: http://dornsife.usc.edu/transnational-religion

Mother Goddess Religion: http://dornsife.usc.edu/transnational-religion/mother-goddess-religion/

Military Hero: http://dornsife.usc.edu/transnational-religion/tran-hung-dao/. Helps women with fertility. Heals reproductive organs.
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9/2/2016 3:32:41 PM

kluna
kluna
Posts: 82
Subject:
@Cindy

I think sometimes our cultures are so blended in our own heads that we confuse what we see! My parents are from two very different regions in Mexico, and I know this has happened to me a few times. One thing I would like to do in my classroom is studying how people pay homage to their ancestors that have passed. I hope I can include Caodai in my classroom.
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