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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Dube - seminar introduction (Mon., 7/25)

Movement in East Asia
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7/30/2016 4:01:31 PM

aschleicher
aschleicher
Posts: 44
Subject: Videos
The videos portrayed Chinese migration as an eventual problem that causes conflict with local populations. Even the title were concerning: "Colony," "Empire," and the others which posed questions as to whether Africa could feed China, but not the other way around. During the interviews with local residents, their main concern was that Chinese families come to the country, and then Chinese-owned business set up shop and begin offering cheap goods to the local population. The videos showed how the movement of people across borders can lead to immigration conflict in all nations, not just in Europe or the U.S.

The NHK video on Japanese investment in Africa, especially the Mozambique area and the export of soybeans to Japan. The Japanese government is financing the building of a port for shipping trade. There is some competition with China, and the interview stated Japanese government should "maximize national interests." There was also a video on the specific trade and investment between Japan and Rwanda, which offered examples as to what companies are developing in the African region.

Overall, I thought that the videos painted an uncomfortable portrait of assistance to Africa as a money-making venture in which some local citizens felt that there was a new colonization.
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8/2/2016 5:16:12 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Afro-Chinese Population
  • In reading Jenni Marsh’s article on the rise of Afro-Chinese citizens I had a lot of aha moments as I thought about the things I saw and heard when I went to China last summer. During my stay in Beijing, I had the opportunity to check out the night life, and one of the most unexpected things I saw was that there were a lot of Nigerians in the clubs we went to. One the people in our group studied and lived in China for some years, and she told us that a lot of the night clubs in China are owned and operated by Nigerians. In reading Marsh’s article, I was able to get more concrete understanding on the changing social landscape of China, and I was saddened to see that some prejudices seem to be universal. I was particularly struck at the account of the African sex worker who said black women are not desired, and this sounds like something I have heard here in the US. In thinking of how I might use this article in my classroom, I noticed a lot of parallels when it came to topics of immigration, legal status and the separation of families. It made me wonder what my students’ thoughts are in regards to what is happening in China.

edited by nramon on 8/2/2016
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8/2/2016 5:16:49 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Chinese business ventures in Africa
  • Howard French’s piece on China’s business ventures in Africa bring up a lot of issues in regards to how Africans and Chinese are affected by trade legislation. I was most struck by the following observation by a Mozambican “I quickly discovered that not all Chinese people are your friends. The Chinese folks here, or at least a portion of them, a big portion of them, are really bad characters. They are looking for a way to get hold of your money.” In thinking about China’s past as a country that was exploited by the imperial powers, I wonder how this historic past might affect how China does business with other countries. Just like in any society, I am sure there are socially conscious people that are aware of the injustices that come with the economic interactions between China and Africa, and I am curious about what the discourse sounds like and what they might be doing to mobilize towards social justice.

edited by nramon on 8/2/2016
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8/3/2016 3:29:12 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Immigration in Japan
  • Reiji Yoshida’s piece on immigration as a possible solution for Japan’s aging and shrinking population brought up a lot of great points that offer a good case of observation for the US. This topic is a very divisive point in US society and according to the article, it seems to somewhat of a divisive point in Japan as well. Some of the perspectives that are pro-immigration were very refreshing. For instance, a reporter in the Foreign press center noted the reciprocity in migration as he noted that the Japanese have migrated while retaining a strong Japanese identity, and he notes that Japan should be open to foreigner as other countries have allowed Japanese citizens in their country. There also seems to be a recognition on the economic benefits of immigration, and although these points have also been made in the US, they have not been as widely accepted here. It seems that given Japan’s demographic patterns, they will have to do something to address the looming issues that come with a shrinking/aging population, and it seems that immigration might be the answer. If this is the case, it will be interesting to see what policies will be implemented and what effects these will have on Japanese society.

edited by nramon on 8/3/2016
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8/3/2016 3:30:04 PM

nramon
nramon
Posts: 90
Subject: Immigration is Though for Japan
  • I was very intrigued by a lot of the points brought up by Noah Smith’s article on citizenship in Japan. Japan has very different policies in regards to citizenship than does the US, and in my mind it made a lot of sense why the US would adopt birthright citizenship. However, unlike the US, Japan did not depend on waves of immigrants to establish itself as a nation. In thinking about this policy, I couldn’t help but think of a waiter I met while I was in Japan. He was Mexican, and his wife was Japanese. They had recently moved to Japan and had no children. In thinking about Japan’s citizenship policies and how foreigner parents pass on their foreigner status even to their children who are born in Japan, and I am curious about what would be the citizenship status of the children of this couple. Their mother is a Japanese citizen but it seems that their father will always be considered a foreigner. Would the children inherit their father’s status as a foreigner or would they be considered Japanese citizens because their mother is a Japanese citizen?

edited by nramon on 8/3/2016
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8/8/2016 11:13:23 AM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Japan's Immigration
I really liked this article about Japan’s immigration problem. There were some interesting issues brought up in the article in regard to Japan’s declining population, especially for a working class, that I was unaware of. It was interesting to read about the labor shortage and the views of immigrants and what jobs immigrants are likely to take. Generally immigrants may take the unskilled positions and less desired jobs that the Japanese are less likely to take. I think that there are many comparison points to countries around the world in regard to views of immigration and the jobs available for immigrants. I think that it is true that sometimes the biggest reason for immigrants taking unskilled jobs is due not just to factors of availability, but probably the biggest deterrent is the language barrier. This would be a great article for using as a comparison to other countries around the world in addressing views and patterns of immigration past and present.
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8/13/2016 4:29:51 PM

hdao
hdao
Posts: 28
Subject: Afro-Chinese marriages boom in Guangzhou: but will it be 'til death do us part'?
Chinese relocate all over the world and import Chinese culture where ever they go, but the Chinese government have some of the most draconian immigration laws, especially towards those who they perceive as lower class of people, namely individuals from African countries. It's simply another case of "us" and "them," because it isn't as though there are 13 million undocumented immigrants like we have in America. From all the benefit China is receiving through its relationship with the African nations, it would behoove China to draw up an immigration policy that would facilitate the marriage between Africans and Chinese, if it wants to mutually prosper and develop. This article could be used to discuss the internal barriers to growth, peace and prosperity. When we look at development, and at China in specific, is development a zero sum game and what can we do to make it sustainable?
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8/14/2016 6:00:29 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1917
Subject:
I think you'll find these internal migration stories and photos interesting. China's factory workers head home: http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-chinese-migrants/
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8/31/2016 10:01:20 AM

ndaza
ndaza
Posts: 20
Subject: Chinese discovered America in 1421
Interesting article that can be used in a Spanish class when teaching cross curriculum.: www.lagranepoca.com:1421 cuando los chinos descubrieron America
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8/31/2016 6:17:34 PM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject: Marco Polo
It is very interesting that their is a possibility the Marco Polo never explored China. If this is true all of our history books are incorrect. One thing that I would try to teach students is how to research what is being explained in the history books published by our states. I would like my students to be critical of what is being taught to them in history class. This would go a long way to help our students develop critical thinking skills. If we can help them develop these skills they will be on their way to acquiring job skills that employers are looking for in employees.
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