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Home » 2016 Summer Seminar » Yan - Globalization and Individuals in China (Wed)

Movement in East Asia
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7/25/2016 9:28:39 AM

cgao
cgao
Administrator
Posts: 150
Subject: Yan - Globalization and Individuals in China (Wed)
Please download and read the attached documents.

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7/27/2016 8:53:51 AM

cgonzalez
cgonzalez
Posts: 59
Subject: Chinese Path to Individualization
This article made me realize how modern societies were able to make the individual separate itself from it's ancestors. We we used to value our ancestors way more in pre-modern times, being very respectful not only the elderly but also the onces before us because they held most of the knowledge that the society had. In china it went from individual ancestor to individual-Communist party, which meant that the individual is now not relying on knowledge from their ancestors but rather it relies on the the knowledge of the party....which i believe makes you work really hard for the stability of the country rather than working really hard for the stability of their community.
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7/27/2016 10:17:59 AM

skroop
skroop
Posts: 96
Subject: Article: Food Safety
I was not too surprised to hear about the food safety issues in China as this is a problem literally everywhere in our world today. It is shocking however, to consider the people who knowingly put poisonous or harmful additives and dyes in their food sources in order to turn a profit.
This following video is a small portion of a news clip I had come across regarding the additives to prawns/shrimp. It was disgusting and upsetting to watch. This video below is only 2 minutes in length and not in English as I had difficulty finding the original--but you can get the point in watching. After watching I thought this is a problem in Asia not “our” issue, but consider the fact that the US ships in 90% of its shrimp from Asia.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LDBMgyeiPes&spfreload=10
http://hotcopper.com.au/threads/prawns-injected-with-silicon-gel-dangerous-food.2789361/
In addition, here is an article on the gel injected shrimp. http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/1934980-in-china-the-curious-case-of-the-gel-injected-shrimp/
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7/27/2016 1:28:42 PM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: Descending Familism
More and more I am hearing about the topic this article addresses. Not only in China, but in many other Asian countries, family values and structures are changing. The old Confucian mindset of listening to one's elders and filial piety is falling apart and making way for idealistic and selfish individuals who are focused on their own success. Even the elder generation has accepted this new wave of thinking; "My elderly informants were fully aware of this difference, and many described the behav- ior of their adult children as “caring and supportive but not obedient” (Yan, 245). Although I understand the need for family's to change and adapt to the times, I don't believe that filial piety should be sacrificed-I feel there can be a balance. This is something I mention in my classes; I speak about how as we grow up and go our separate ways (e.g., college), but that we must not forget to honor and respect those before us who got us to that point. Yan mentions the example of Teacher Liu's family where his son and daughter in law essentially forced them out, which speaks to this changing social norm. It saddens me to think that society is changing so much but hope that this will not result in a complete destruction of familism.
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7/27/2016 1:35:03 PM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject: Article on food safety
I find that the study that found the elites are able to use guanxi to have healthy foods grown for themselves when the rest of the population does not have access to healthy food is not conducive to helping their country. I am sure people in the US who have wealth are able to buy healthy food that is more expensive but I do not believe that a grower would only produce for a small number of people. This would not be profitable.
edited by mcervantes on 7/27/2016
edited by mcervantes on 7/28/2016
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7/27/2016 1:51:59 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
In Taiwan, after a female gets married, she will change her last name into her husband's. But in mainland China, females keep their last names no matter they are married or not.
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7/27/2016 2:03:04 PM

jschilp
jschilp
Posts: 24
Subject: The Individual in Chinese Society
I'm a big fan of the idea of "The Chinese individual as a process of becoming rather than as a structure of being." Even after decades, we are still becoming, we are growing and changing. I can't stress enough to myself and my students that we must always grow and change as we learn more and listen more. We can never stop learning. When we do, we die. Even as a teacher moving into my 21st year in the classroom, I feel like I am still becoming a teacher by refining my techniques and challenging myself to do things I've never done before. I know I'm becoming a husband and father throughout my marriage and throughout my children's lives. Everything we go through helps me become a better human in the various roles I play. Love this idea.
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7/27/2016 2:07:32 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
In western country, people dress strangers by their genders, for example Mr., Ms, or Mrs.. But In china, people address each other ( not only strangers) by their job titles, such as professor x, doctor x, chairman x, manager x, and teacher x. As a Mandarin teacher, I am not only teaching the language, but also explaining the culture behind the language.
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7/27/2016 2:18:12 PM

kluna
kluna
Posts: 82
Subject:
I had never learned about these traditional Chinese ideas of becoming. According to Professor Yan, individuals are defined by their social relations and their fulfillment of social expectations. I have also never heard anyone Chinese discuss abortion, but it is rational that under these beliefs, a fetus would not be considered a human. I would really like to pose the question to my students to have them consider what makes a human “self?” Generally speaking, a fetus is considered a human by American standards (the debate usually comes in the developmental stage of the fetus). But it is interesting to consider if any actions should play into becoming a human and leaving your mark on earth. My students are mostly Latino, which makes them more conservative and pro-life, but I would like to hear their thoughts on the need to fulfill social duties.
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7/27/2016 2:29:48 PM

rmcgill
rmcgill
Posts: 7
Subject:
What has been the effect on the elderly in rural collectives as a result of younger generations migrating into urban areas?
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7/27/2016 2:31:27 PM

EunjeeKang
EunjeeKang
Posts: 21
Subject: Millennials?
As other developing countries in the world, China, I believe, is experiencing generation gaps and struggles between younger and older generations. What I want to know is how different and similar are Chinese Millennials compared to American Millennials? Also, how do they deal with the ideological collision since they are now exposed to democratic ideas and culture?
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7/27/2016 2:34:41 PM

jmallard
jmallard
Posts: 22
Subject:
http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/11/asia/china-orphanage-children/

There's pros and cons to the Chinese social expectations in terms of social justice. I love the concept of earning your privileges through hard work and the honor that grandparents and great- parents have in part of becoming 100% a person, but in terms of other factors that can become a barrier to completing the requirements such as a person with birth defects or disabilities, it becomes more challenging for them to take their place in this society or meet the social duties requirements.

I am concerned about the high rate of children that are being abandoned due to their perceived doom to be a successful member of society. According to the article it stated, "the number of abandoned children has dropped steadily in the last decade, but the numbers remain disturbingly high. Today, almost all of China's unwanted children have disabilities. Dozens of new cases of abandoned children are reported each day."

Is it possible for there to be some provisions or some sense of empathy for the children born with physical disabilities or mental disabilities that are discovered later?

For my class, I would have them to brainstorm what are some social duties they feel should be required for themselves?
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7/27/2016 2:39:53 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
There are 15 million children are left behind at home living with their grandparents. It has brought many social issues. In order to have the children stay with their parents who are working at cities, the government has past a law to allow those children to attend local schools where their parents are working disregarding their Hukou ( legal household registration).
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7/27/2016 2:40:13 PM

mcervantes
mcervantes
Posts: 23
Subject:
This Chinese culture that believes that females will not allow parents to be able to become ancestors nor become 100% of a person is very sad to me. Even though without females the blood line could not continue females are not considered to be important is very disheartening. If females were to revolt I wonder what would happen in China. I am hopeful that I will hear some positive information about females in the Second part of the lecture.
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7/27/2016 2:42:51 PM

yyan
yyan
Posts: 20
Subject:
I believe that Hukou system will eventually disappear in China sooner or later.
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7/27/2016 2:44:46 PM

gmora
gmora
Posts: 23
Subject: Concept of the Individual
I was familiar with confucian values and ancestor worship but I feel Professor Yan really provided an insider perspective of Chinese cultural practices. Having Professor Yan explain the development of the self, as practiced within Chinese culture, helps bring more depth and complexity to my understanding to some of the internal struggles individuals of Chinese origin face.

I would consider a continuity and change activity based on the transformation of confucianism (confucicanism, neo-confucianism, modern confucianism).
edited by gmora on 8/1/2016
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7/27/2016 2:54:25 PM

mhagiwara
mhagiwara
Posts: 32
Subject: I vs We
I found the "I vs We" discussion fascinating because past generations in many east Asian countries focused on the "We" mentality. An individual's actions usually represented a collective group and so, I feel, people were careful not to offend anyone else or partake in actions that would make the "We" look bad. Over time, in China as we have read and heard, there has been a switch to focusing more on the individual and developing one's self. This discovery of the self, borrowing from western ideals, has resulted in an acceptance and tolerance of those things that were once viewed as being vices. When teaching students about progress and self-development, I think it would be acceptable to use China as an example of a changing modern society.
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7/27/2016 3:03:37 PM

nminassian
nminassian
Posts: 23
Subject: The individual in Chinese society
I found Mr. Yan's presentation very informative. It was fascinating to learn that in order to become a full person one has to go through certain stages: getting married, producing a male child, make sure to have your offspring gets married, and produces a male descendant. It was sad to hear that even though a person could have been a homosexual,they were forced to put their individual needs aside, get married to straight woman and produce a child in sake of helping their fathers to become a full person. I wonder how my students will respond learning this information.Today's generation is 180 Degree opposite to this... It would of made the American culture/life a little bit better if the younger generation wasn't so self centered and was focused on family/community unit.
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7/27/2016 3:09:54 PM

kluna
kluna
Posts: 82
Subject:
I am very interested in the effects of migration on children once they are left behind. In a Latin American seminar that I attended, we learned about the social emotional effects of parental migration. Some of the main issues that children experienced were a feeling of abandonment, drug abuse, poverty, etc. And when children were reunited with their parents, they often have difficulty overcoming the feelings of abandonment, because they lacked communication and connection with their parents while they were away. I didn’t know about the rural to urban migration in China, but I would imagine that they have similar end results. In an article published by the China Labour Bulletin, it seems like there are similar issues with these Chinese children. I wonder what the Chinese government is doing to address these issues, if anything?
Link: http://www.clb.org.hk/content/migrant-workers-and-their-children
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7/27/2016 3:11:27 PM

cindyn
cindyn
Posts: 33
Subject: Marriage in China
Professor Yan's lecture on the "individual in traditional Chinese" society provided answers to questions I have been contemplating for a while now . The two parts that really resonants with me was the "great self" and the "full person". Being born into a traditional Asian family, my parents have always lecture their children about the importance of family and self-sacrifice for the greater good, which usually ties back to the family again. Being an Asian female, my parents have pushed the idea of marriage my whole life. It got worse after I graduated college and now has become a routine subject in our conservations. I always thought my parents had nothing better to do than to nag me about marriage and about continuing the family's name. Professor Yan has given me insight to my parents mentality and perspective. Chinese culture has a large influence on my family's traditions and beliefs. This idea of becoming a "full person" maybe something my parents are thinking about subconsciously?
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