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Home » Lesson Plans » Documentary Filmmaking - Video 1 - Asia

Please share lesson plans you have developed and links to those available elsewhere.
1/21/2017 11:07:23 PM

rcharles
rcharles
Posts: 35
Subject: Documentary Filmmaking - Video 1 - Asia
VIDEO PRODUCTION 2 – DOCUMENTARY FILMMAKING

Rationale: Students will broaden their social and cultural awareness by exploring media depictions, representations and identity. Students will identify how the professional elements of documentary filmmaking are used to create effective non-fiction human experiences by viewing a series of documentaries and journalistic programs centered around Asian culture over the course of two weeks. This unit is will be integral in helping students understand the differences between sympathy and empathy and how understanding that difference will allow students to effectively value the inclusion of the human experience (increasing the quality of the film) equally important to the quantifiable data and evidence necessary to complete the project.

Skill and Content Objectives [font=" lato="" light","serif"]CCSS.ELA-Literacy.rh.11-12.7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.[/font]

POINT OF VIEW

Lesson 1 – Understanding the Role of Documentaries
Role #1 - CHALLENGE belief systems in order to CHANGE point of view. Students will explore how the filmmaker’s point of view can influence the audience’s point of view.

Pre Screening Exercise
Write two paragraphs (1) for and (2) against the existence the pursuit of money and power.
Students have to challenge their own biases on capitalism to provide an argument on both sides.

Watch Iron Moon [screened in class]
[Worksheet #1] - Describe how this documentary uses beliefs/values (on the subject of wealth) to challenge perception and change point of view?

Discussion
Evidence – Proof: what we hear and see as evidence.

Experts – Who are they? How do they influence the audience? Are they qualified? Who were not included?

Purpose – What is the goal of this documentary? What does it want to accomplish?

Appeal – How does the video appeal to your emotions? Logic? How was it visually appealing?

Target Audience – Who was the video made for? If you change the target audience, how would it change the video?

VALIDITY OF TESTIMONY - A

Lesson 2 – Testimony part 1

Evaluating the validity of testimony and the faultiness of memory.

Watch In Hafu: The Mixed-Race Experience in Japan, director Megumi Nishikura [screened in class]

[Worksheet #2] Students evaluate the reliability of memory and critically analyzing the motivations of the interviewees.

Discussion
Evidence – Proof: what we hear and see as evidence.

Experts – Who are they? How do they influence the audience? Are they qualified? Who were not included?

Purpose – What is the goal of this documentary? What does it want to accomplish?


Target Audience – Who was the video made for? If you change the target audience, how would it change the video?

In the video, what may be some reasons the people chose to do the show.

In the video, the interviewers based their claims on their memory of the events and how they believed they experienced them. What’s wrong with relying on memory?

In the video, what forms of persuasion did the video use to convince you of the events?

VALIDITY OF TESTIMONY - B

Lesson 3 – Testimony part 2 (The Value of Memory/Testimony)

Evaluating the value of testimony and the impact of emotional memory. The differences between Sympathy and Empathy: sympathy is feeling compassion, sorrow, or pity for the hardships that another person encounters, while empathy is putting yourself in the shoes of another. Students will explore how documentaries activate empathy to appeal to audiences with reenactments, emotional testimonies through the function of memory.
[Worksheet #3, 4 & 5]

Students will write a paragraph detailing their 1st memory and discuss the challenges of the exercise.

Students will complete a roll play memory exercise reenacting the details of Rebecca Chan’s account [SEE ATTACHED] with the use of visuals and audio.

Students will read her actual account and compare and contrast the exercise to her memory. We will then discuss the value of her memory.

Discussion Part A will center around these questions:
Do you think Rebecca Chan’s memory is faulty? Why or why not?
Do you think your first memory is faulty? Why or why not?
What value does memory have in documentaries if memories can be faulty?
What value does your memory have to you and why might that be important to an audience?

Discussion Part B The differences between Sympathy and Empathy. Sympathy is feeling compassion, sorrow, or pity for the hardships that another person encounters, while empathy is putting yourself in the shoes of another.
How does testimony and memory create empathy?
Did you sympathize with Rebecca Chan or empathize with her, and why?
How does testimony and memory create empathy during emotional interviews?
How would it make you feel for people to question the integrity of your first memory, and why?
How does testimony and memory create empathy with re-enactments?


Evidence of Achievement
[font=Times]After forming groups, students will create a presentation pitch of their documentary topic to dissect the appeal (emotional vs. logical), type of experts and evidence that may be used, as well as the purpose (who is their target audience and what do they want the viewer to do/understand) before filming begins. 10 points extra credit will be award if students incorporate an Asian element into their topic and/or material presented in the documentary.[/font]
edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017
edited by rcharles on 1/21/2017

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