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Home » High School Ideas » pre-2011 high school ideas

Please use this forum to share ideas, materials, and methods for teaching about Asia that are appropriate for high school classes. Please also note the social studies, literature, and other discipline-specific threads in the "Asia in My Classroom" forum.
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7/21/2007 11:57:14 AM

gjones
gjones
Posts: 51
Subject: Possible Asian Unit Introduction
Another lesson that one can do is through the use of small learning teams. I would use this or something very similar to INTRODUCE a unit on Asia. I would break the class up into groups of four or five, and usually these are groups that have worked together before.
1. Simply have the students raise their hands and tell you the names of the Asian cultures- Japanese, Chinese, Korean etc. Write them on the board.
3. Once they are broken into teams, go around with a hat. The names of the various Asian cultures are written on slips of paper. Each team selects one (eliminates stupid arguments and time wasted).
4. Each group's mission is to simply list in 5 minutes as many things as they can about that particular culture. Have them be as specific as possible. Also, before they get to this point, address the difference between a fact and an opinion or stereotype (I neglected to do this one time and it really backfired on me and caused a lot more work in the end). Tell them to think about all areas of life- location, food, entertainment, history, music, sports etc.
5. When they are done have them read their lists to the class. You will be amazed at how little they know, how easily they confuse the cultures etc...
Address some of the misconceptions. You will find this an excellent way to hook your students and it is an excellent springboard into your unit.[Edit by="gjones on Jul 21, 11:58:00 AM"][/Edit]
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5/13/2008 4:34:22 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Subject: chinese in france during world war one
Students are often surprised to learn about the role of Asians and Africans in the First World War. Here are two articles, both of which include stereotypes and one of which includes racist labels, about the Chinese in France during World War One. Both articles include photos of Chinese laborers.

http://www.greatwardifferent.com/Great_War/Chinese_Laborers/Chinese_Laborers_01.htm
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5/19/2008 2:56:52 PM

mceballos
mceballos
Posts: 33
Subject: Re: High School Ideas - Webquests
Our school has an umbrella curriculum that is similar to your idea. Our school uses PBL (project base learning) in which they make their learning a part of a "real-world" scenario. I am making an original webquest with East Asia topics/concerns. One idea is to help them determine whether the hierarchy of the aristocrates in China was influenced by their geography with respect to The Great Wall, the yellow river, the Himalayas, and the Pacific Ocean. I still have everything on the drawing board. It would be great to send National Geographic several final project for evaluation.

--
Mr. Ceballos High School Teacher
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5/30/2008 11:03:03 PM

spavelkagregg
spavelkagregg
Posts: 71
Subject: The Toad Bridegroom (A Korean Folk Tale) and others
As we launch into the final sweep of days this school year, mythology is where the class is dwelling. Completely out of sequence, we finished Shakespeare's well loved and over trodden love story, Romeo and Juliet, just in time to tuck in the background to the various allusions and other literary devices on the bard's figurative landscape. Along that road, due to the heritage projects at the beginning of the year, many students have been bringing up correlations to other folk tales within their own cultural bloodlines. The Toad Bridegroom, a Korean Folk Tale, is one such tale. Like the Greeks, the good mortals were protected by the gods and the ones who disobeyed the gods were punished etc. The inspirational impetus is truly uncertain at times; however, the connections are clear, valid, and validating. Good resources for those teaching English to the younger set - high school freshman.


The Toad Bridegroom (A Korean Folk Tale)

The earliest form of religion practiced by Korea’s ancient peoples was based on old folk traditions rooted in the occult-like worship of shamans. The earliest identifiable inhabitants of the Korean peninsula were the Altaic-speaking Tungus people, who migrated to Korea in about 3000 B.C. and solidified the mythological worship of the three sam sin gods. These gods included the most popular and almighty god of heaven and two others-the god of Earth and the god of ancestors.

According to Tungus beliefs, in 2333 B.C., the shaman-king Tagun, a direct descendant of the god of heaven, founded Korea. Tangun went on to encourage the widespread worship of the god of heaven from the great altar he established near what is today the city of Seoul.

The Tungus worshiped these three important mythical gods and countless lesser gods. On Earth and in the natural world, the Tungus found new and interesting gods or godly creations in the forms of animals, plants, and landscapes. Shamanic teachings and values were directed against the spread of evil spirits. The gods guided and protected those who were gracious and good. Many of the Tungus people’s fundamental beliefs are still honored and followed by the Koreans today.

This selection is a retelling of the ancient Korean tale of the big toad that wants to be loved and accepted for who he is-not for what he looks like. This theme goes along with the theme of love based on looks in Romeo and Juliet. Another folk tale from Korea even hits closer to the Shakespearean tragic tale.


Image:barrysclipart.com
She was buried near the place where the flower was found. After a while, another flower appeared in the same place as the first one.



Endless Love

A Traditional Korean Folktale

An original tale written by
Ji-Young Lee from Korea

This is a tale of undying love between a young couple who won the struggle to be together.

Long ago, there was a village named 'Sa-rang' in Korea. The village had two flowers that cried when a couple passed nearby. These flowers never died.

A long time ago there was a couple, Soo-il and Soon-ae, living in Sa-rang. They loved each other so much that they wanted to get married, but Soon-ae's father, who was very rich, never allowed her to marry Soo-il, who was very poor.

A few days later, her father lied to her. He told her that Soo-il got married to another girl and pushed her to marry a rich guy named Jung-bae. She was very sad because she believed her father and agreed to marry Jung-bae.

But, Soon-ae' and Jung-bae were not happy because they did not love each other. He hung out with friends, met other girls, and seldom came back home. They would not stay together long.

One day, Soon-ae heard a strange, continuous sound from outside the window, so she slowly went to the window and opened it up. When she looked down, there was Soo-il. Her heart started beating faster, and she made up her mind to go to him. She jumped down from her room, which was on the second floor, and then she felt a big pain and fainted.

When Soon-ae was able to open her eyes, she saw the people she loved. There were members of her family and Soo-il. They all looked at her with concern, but at that moment she discovered that she could not move at all. She knew her father had lied to her, and she cried every day. Soo-il came to see her every day, but her father would not let him see her.

Soo-il decided to secretly take her to a small town in the country where nobody could find them. In that town. he cut trees and sold them to make a living, while Sa-rang slowly recovered and was able to move again.

One day when Soo-il was coming back home after cutting trees, he saw a rose on the edge of a cliff. Because Soon-ae liked roses, he tried to pick the rose. Unfortunately, he slid and fell over the cliff.

While she was waiting for him as usual, some people living in the town came to her with his possessions. Immediately, she went to the place where his possessions were found even though she could not walk well.

However, when she got there, she could not find his body, only a strange flower. After that, she never ate or drank and never talked to anybody. She only thought about Soo-il, who could never return to her.

A couple of days later, she closed her eyes for ever and ever. She was buried near the place where the flower was found. After a while, her grave disappeared, and another flower appeared in the same place as the first one.

and yet one more...


While Kongi was doing the house chores, a frog appeared in front of her. It did all the house chores for her.




Kongi and Potgi,

A Korean Cinderella Story

Retold by Youngil-Seo from Korea

This is a Korean "Cinderella-type" story. A beautiful young girl is mistreated by her ugly step-mother and her ugly step-sister.

A long, long time ago, there were two sisters. The older sister's name was Kongi and the younger sister's name was Potgi. Kongi had a stepmother. The stepmother and Potgi disliked Kongi because she was so beautiful and kind; she was a lovely person.

Potgi was very ugly; she was also a greedy and selfish person. The stepmother and Potgi always made Kongi do house chores, but she never complained about that.

One day, a rich, young man held a party to look for a girl to be his bride. All of the young girls were invited to the party, but Kongi couldn't go because the stepmother ordered her to stay home and do house chores and told her not to go there.

While Kongi was doing the house chores, a frog appeared in front of her. The frog did all the house chores for her, so despite the stepmother's orders, she attended the party.

As soon as the young man saw her, he fell in love with her. He wanted to know more about her, but she left the party because she had to get back home before her stepmother came back home.

Leaving the party hurriedly, she lost her rubber shoe. When it came off and she lost it, they young man picked it up. He was able to find the beautiful Kongi because of her rubber shoe. They got married and lived happily ever after.

Explanation of this story
Beauty can be very important in life. :P
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5/31/2008 8:27:12 PM

jchristensen
jchristensen
Posts: 46
Subject: Re: High School Ideas - Intro to Footbinding
Have you read "The Good Earth" by Pearl Buck?

In it, the son is incensed that he must marry a woman with large feet! It reinforces his status as a peasant.
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5/31/2008 8:35:03 PM

jchristensen
jchristensen
Posts: 46
Subject: Footbinding
Two books that I recommend are:

"Snow Flower and the Secret Fan: A Novel" by Lisa See

"Splendid Slippers:A Thousand Years of an Erotic Tradition" by Beverley Jackson


We had an excellent lecturer discuss the tradition. It amazed us that it was perpetuated by the women of the family; it was not subjugation by the patriarch.
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6/26/2008 10:01:46 AM

mceballos
mceballos
Posts: 33
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
I taught poetry to the ninth graders and used the haiku and tanka expressive
techniques. It was interesting that they found the words 'haiku' and 'tanka' having little meaning to these peotic styles. Once the class recieved ample examples to model from; however, the most influencial was bringing acutual Chinese tree and the like into the classroom or taking them to any Chinese botanical garden. It was an interesting yet amazing
outcome of student work.

--
Mr. Ceballos High School Teacher
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6/29/2008 12:25:32 PM

jchavez
jchavez
Posts: 34
Subject: Re: High School Ideas - Intro to Footbinding
The Good Earth was the novel for last year's Academic Decathlon competition; I remember the students being confused about the importance of foot size.
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6/29/2008 12:26:56 PM

jchavez
jchavez
Posts: 34
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
We were able to visit a Japanese garden and work on imagery and poetry; the students really liked it.
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6/29/2008 2:32:29 PM

jchristensen
jchristensen
Posts: 46
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
The Japanese Garden on Woodley in Van Nuys is an option for schools in the San Fernando Valley. It is beautiful and the docents I observed were well informed.



http://www.thejapanesegarden.com/Garden/Pages/home.html
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7/18/2008 8:58:19 AM

nblade
nblade
Posts: 32
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
If you are willing to spend a few bucks on some pretty good powerpoints you can go to teachersdiscovery.com and download them. English teachers as well as history teachers can go to the site and check them out. I downloaded a Vietnam War ppt. that included video clips from such movies as Forrest Gump, Good Morning Vietnam, Apocalypse Now, and Full Metal Jacket. I teach U.S. History so I found this helpful. The ppt's are, however, a little pricey.
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7/20/2008 7:38:01 AM

anicolai
anicolai
Posts: 34
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
There is a lot of actual historical film available on youtube that can be shown in class. If you are not sure about your internet connection at the moment of truth you can save the youtube videos with something like orbit and play them back at your convenience with a flv player, also easily found and downloadable. I was able to show video of Mao's long March and his meeting with Nixon with the classroom digital projector from my laptop without too much fuss. I ended up using these videos a lot because it held the students' attention pretty well.
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7/20/2008 8:09:05 PM

anicolai
anicolai
Posts: 34
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
I visited the Hsi Lai Temple in Hacienda Heights. It's about 60 miles from the valley. but the temple is enormous (on 15 aces), comprised of architecture from the Ming & Qing dynasties. Apparently founded by Hsing Yun the temple is for the Fo Guang Shan (Buddha's Light Mountain) Buddhist Order. According to their website, it is a Mahayana Chinese Buddhism monastic order. They have outreach programs, classes in meditation, book publishing, a book store, tea shop, and a museum with lots of art and an actual Shakyamuni relic (they say). The place is a wonderful exhibit of all kinds of interesting facets of Buddhism, not the least of which is its effort to bring Buddhism into the contemporary world. They told me that schools come all the time and are given tours. I just think this is fascinating. If only it weren't so far. Still I think it would be worth it to take a class on a field trip.
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7/21/2008 10:27:59 AM

kirion
kirion
Posts: 43
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
to: mceballos,
I think that it is very good idea to bring something related to the theme. You mentioned bringing a Chinese tree, and taking the students to a Chinese Botanical Garden.
I have a suggestion: since Haiku and Tanka belong to Japanese literature, you could take the students to a Japanese Garden. While Japanese and Chinese gardens sometimes look alike, they are very different; both have unique elements and styles.
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7/21/2008 5:12:48 PM

anicolai
anicolai
Posts: 34
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
Today I finally got around to visiting the Japanese Gardens next to the water recycling plant on Woodley between Burbank & Victory. A docent took us on a tour and we got to look at a lot of pretty views. He told us it's among the top 10 in the country. They have a teahouse and a gift shop. They also have special events if you check the website. They have school tours all the time. His little presentation took about 90 minutes. Lots of information about the theory of Japanese gardens (different shades of green, for example). It's something I think our students could appreciate, especially since the bus ride is not so lengthy. It could be combined with the tour of the water reclamation plant to double as a science lesson.
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7/22/2008 10:03:45 AM

ddiaz
ddiaz
Posts: 31
Subject: Re: High School Ideas- "Infinite Shades of Gray"
During my first year of teaching I went on a field trip to the Japanese American Museum in Los Angeles. While there I picked up a videos that was made by Toyo Miyake called "Infinite Shades of Gray". The video is short (about 30 minutes) but the footage is terrific. Miyake "smuggled" into Manzanar a camera that allowed him to capture the daily lives of Japanese prisoners. The film is really a mini biography, but it is worth showing students due to the great photos he captured in the camps. If you're around LA visit the museum and pick up a copy.

--
Danny
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7/26/2008 7:27:49 PM

nblade
nblade
Posts: 32
Subject: Re: chinese in france during world war one
Clay,
Excellent website!! I teach WWI and extensively cover the Western Front. To be honest I did not realize how much the Chinese were involved on the Western Front. I clicked on the link that you gave and started reading and I couldn't stop. I will definitely be checking this site out when I cover WWI this coming school year and be sure to include the contributions that the Chinese gave to the war effort.
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7/28/2008 11:20:50 AM

llowe
llowe
Posts: 32
Subject: Re: High School Ideas- "Infinite Shades of Gray"
I had no idea such a thing even existed! I wish I'd known about that when I taugh Manzanar last year. Do you know if it is sold online anywhere?
-Laura
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7/28/2008 11:24:28 AM

llowe
llowe
Posts: 32
Subject: Re: The Toad Bridegroom (A Korean Folk Tale) and others
In your heritage project, do you require them to come up with folktales that reflect their family's ethnic background? That's an interesting thought.
-Laura
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7/28/2008 9:22:15 PM

vchiu
vchiu
Posts: 35
Subject: Re: High School Ideas
We talked about Confucianism in class. The idea about ancestor worship is one of the central theme for Confucianism. My parents still practice ancestor worship.

They put variety of fruits and food on a silk embroidered table cloth with ancestor's name board and pictures. They burn the incense and pour wine for them. Then they "ke tou" kneel down and bow to them three times while saying their prayers. I am a christian and it is against my religion to bow to another being. However, I think it will be O.k. to show a short video clip of how people carry out that ritual to the central idea of Confucianism.
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