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8/16/2008 3:25:23 PM

jlalas
jlalas
Posts: 33
Subject: Re: Sports -- generating interest in Asia
Today, the sport of mixed martial arts or "MMA" is getting more and more popular. Just 10 years, the "Ulimate Fighting Championship" was seen as barbaric and violent. Although today some still see it as such, it has become more mainstreamed as you will see it on DVD's, sports bars, and even on MTV. In fact MTV has had multiple seasons of reality shows in which men train and compete for a chance to fight in the Ultimate Fighting's main arena known as the "Octagon".

In Japan, the UFC's equivalent is PRIDE fighting. Although recently bought out by UFC, PRIDE was a huge deal because of its more international pool of fighters. One of the best fighters to come out of PRIDE was Japan's KAZUSHI SAKURABA. You can teach an entire lesson on Judo and Japanese submissions as a way of introducing students to Japanese martial arts culture. Sakuraba was one of the few fighters to beat Quentin Rampage Jackson, the man who is the UFC's current light heavy weight champion!!
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8/16/2008 11:41:39 PM

jlalas
jlalas
Posts: 33
Subject: Japanese Olympic Swim team
The Japanese Olympic swim team, the 4 man relay race was leading the pack after the first two swimmers, but finished third overall behind the United States and Australia.

One of the swimmers is Kitajima Kosuke, who is a four time GOLD MEDALIST in the 100 and 200 meter breast stroke!

All we hear about is Phelps, because we are in America....when I lived in japan in 2004, Kosuke was the superstar. Not everyone can win 7 gold medals like Phelps, but i mean TWO gold medals in one olympic year sounds like a pretty big thing to me. He is yet another athelete that kids could learn more about!!
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8/18/2008 3:41:38 PM

mceballos
mceballos
Posts: 33
Subject: Re: Dong Fangzhuo, from China, Scores!
To those who feel that sports have come a long way in other parts of the world. We must look at how this has or has not been influenced by the government.
Let's look at Baseball: Takashi Saito (japan)
Basketball: Yao Ming (china)
Track & Field :Liu Xiang (china)
Golf Shi Hyun Ahn (korea)
Etc.: you name it...
These athletes have their own stories to tell. Look at the latest from Yao and Liu from China. They share some interesting details about their country.

--
Mr. Ceballos High School Teacher
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9/13/2008 2:04:12 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Subject: 1964 olympics
The 2008 Olympics in Beijing certainly attracted the interest of students. I think we should seize upon this to discuss what the 1964 Tokyo games and the 1988 Seoul games meant for those countries.

Here's a good article on the importance of the 1964 games for Japan. It's part of a Japan Society collection of resources. It was written by Paul Droubie of Manhattan College.

http://aboutjapan.japansociety.org/content.cfm/japans_rebirth_at_the_1964_tokyo_summer
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7/19/2012 6:08:10 PM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Subject: baseball and taiwan (and japan)
Visiting night markets in Taipei, one is struck by the number of US major league baseball jerseys for sale.

Over the past decade a number of players from Taiwan have made it to the "big leagues." The first was CHEN Chin-feng 陳 金鋒, an outfielder who played for the Dodgers starting in 2002. Chen is an aborigine, a member of the Siraya group. Another player from Taiwan to join the Dodgers was KUO Hong-chih 郭泓志. Kuo played well enough in 2010 to make it to the all-star game. By far the most successful player from Taiwan thus far, however, is WANG Chien-min 王建民. Wang now pitches for the Washington Nationals, but he anchored the New York Yankees rotation in 2006 and 2007, winning 19 games each season.

You may soon be reading about LIN Tzu-wei 林子偉. Last month Lin signed with the Boston Red Sox for over $2 million. Lin’s 18 and just graduated from high school. The New York Yankees wanted the young shortstop two years ago and offered $350,000. Taiwan’s baseball association blocked the deal, threatening to ban Lin from ever playing or coaching in Taiwan if he signed before graduating from high school.

Much has been written about Japanese baseball (You Gotta Have Wa is a great book) and there’s even a feature film on it (Mr. Baseball, featuring Tom Selleck as the “fish out of water” American playing in Japan). Unfortunately, there’s not much written about the history of baseball in Taiwan.

There are many errors, for example, in the announcer’s opening comments at the 2009 Little League World Series (see YouTube video below). Some are mistakes about Taiwan’s history, but for us here the key one is how baseball came to the island. It was brought to Taiwan by Japanese during the long period (1895-1945) when Taiwan was a Japanese colony (the announcer mistakenly has baseball arriving in Japan after 1945 and then being transmitted to China and finally Taiwan) .

Taiwan, as many teachers know, has enjoyed great success in Little League. Teams from Taiwan has won 17 Little League Championships and a team from Gueishan Elementary School in Taoyuan County has just qualified for the August 2012 World Series in Williamsport, PA.

Taiwan’s government has a useful “100 years of baseball in Taiwan” timeline at: http://www.taiwan.gov.tw/lp.asp?ctNode=1784&CtUnit=516&BaseDSD=7&mp=14. One finds that schools, government departments, and businesses all sponsored teams. At one point during World War II, the top hitter in Japan’s major leagues was WUChang-cheng (1942).

The point of all this is to illustrate how student interest in sports could be exploited to engage them in discussions of Asia, of the intertwining of cultures, and of the business of sports.

For example, what rituals do American players observe before starting a game? You and your students may find this video of how one Taiwanese little league team gets fired up of interest:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0C-pC-VMTo

***
2009 Little League World Series opening (ESPN via YouTube)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rrbPa8HRSpU

With the Olympics again upon us – do your students respond to efforts to use sports to bring up other subjects?

Have students raised questions about "LINsanity" moving away from New York as Jeremy Lin signs with the Houston Rockets. (BTW - Lin is a Californian whose parents are from Taiwan.)

http://online.wsj.com/article/AP86c0073eb3844c83985cffb01068c8ee.html
edited by Clay Dube on 7/20/2012
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1/12/2013 4:20:57 PM

eleyva
eleyva
Posts: 31
Subject:
Most kids don't realize the long history of sports in nations such as Japan and China. Western sports have usually been spread by American servicemen, trade, and now international media. It's interesting to note, for example, that the world's home run king is not Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, or even Barry Bonds, but Sadaharu Oh, a player from the Japanese baseball league who was the product of a Chinese father and Japanese mother. Mr. Oh played from 1959-1980 and had an amazing career with "[font=Verdana, Arial, sans-serif]868 home runs, 2786 hits, and 2390 walks. He led the league in home runs 15 times and was elected MVP nine times." His 868 career home runs are over 100 more than the questionable totals by Barry Bonds, the recognized (although deserving of an asterisk), MLB leader in HRs.[/font]



http://www.baseball-reference.com/bullpen/Sadaharu_Oh




E. Leyva
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7/24/2013 9:09:47 PM

lstribling
lstribling
Posts: 31
Subject:
Ok. THis post is old, but anyone who writes about United is ok by me. Park no longer plays for United. He was playing for QPR, in a rather disappointing season. He was for a long time an engine. He never stopped running. United's newest asian player is a Japanese striker, well actually probably best as a playmaker, Shinji Kagawa. He was probably played out of position last season, but was still pretty great. He was injured for most of the year.
One of the big issues in the soccer world is the role of asian tours as part of the soccer preseason. There are of course giant fan bases throughout all of asia, and team go and play exhibition games against local teams or all star teams. Mostly the teams play their "kids" (young players who are looking to impress). They often sit the stars that people come to see. These games are huge profit centers for the visiting european teams.
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8/1/2013 6:44:14 AM

sho
sho
Posts: 30
Subject:
I have an idea for students in my Chinese class: to research on Chinese American athletes whom they know about. For example, Yao Ming, Jeremy Lin, etc. Also, in recent years some NBA players went to China to play for the CBA, a counterpart of the NBA.

--
Simon Ho
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8/15/2013 12:17:34 AM

Clay Dube
Clay Dube
Administrator
Posts: 1911
Subject:
The Little League championships are upon us. Teams from Taiwan used to dominate the contest. That's no longer the case. What changed?
http://thediplomat.com/asia-life/2013/08/what-happened-to-taiwans-little-league-champs/
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8/26/2013 3:02:19 PM

sthroop
sthroop
Posts: 38
Subject: Japanese Baseball Game
I have attended several different sporting events in Asia, including a soccer match in Indoonesia, and a sumo match in Japan. One sporting event that I still would love to see is baseball in Japan. The culture around baseball in Japan is phenomenal and I would love to compare it to American baseball games.
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6/8/2014 11:16:26 PM


Guest
Subject:
Can we compare team names across cultures?
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12/2/2014 7:37:29 PM

egonzalez
egonzalez
Posts: 32
Subject:
I found a great article that highlights the biggest Asian sports stars. An article in The Diplomat titled 10 Biggest Asian Sports Stars, http://thediplomat.com/2014/08/10-biggest-asian-sports-stars/ makes the case that Asian athletes now span all over the globe playing in different sports. Number one on the list is Manny Pacquiao, boxing icon. Number two on the list is Masahiro Tanaka, who plays for the New York Yankees. Number three on the list is Li Na, the most decorated Asian tennis player. The list is impressive because it spans so many sports, from basketball and cricket.
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1/6/2015 10:22:57 AM

lguthrie
lguthrie
Posts: 41
Subject: Third attempt to post. Sports and students - an inquiry
Over the last decade, I have used the book: In the Year of the Boar and Jackie Robinson to introduce my students to Asian culture, history as well as to the history of immigration to the United States. This is especially important for the children of immigrants or for new English Learners, it speaks to their experiences and allows a venue for bringing familial ties into the instructional program. The importance of sports, a la, How Baseball Saved Us, has been demonstrated over and over again for the various "minority" groups within the fabric of American society.
Students are placed in cooperative groups of four and are asked to "Think like an anthropologist" in the spirit of Kaplan's gifted and talented techniques. As a class, we cull through all the questions and decided upon the twenty best questions. Then students are charged with interviewing a family member, relative or acquaintance who must be twenty or more years older than they. They then take the information and create a brochure using Pages, they must have pictures, captions and citations. We will then conduct a contest among a different class to select the best product. These publishing their information is the ultimate goal.
Finally, in their cooperative groups, they must go to three different sport websites and find noteworthy events to post to a timeline. They decide upon the theme of the timeline, e.g. Great Moments in Japanese Sports, or Asians Take the Field (examples of past projects) The best timeline is mounted around the classroom in time for Back to School Night. Once again making their work public.
LBGuthrie
King M.S.
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1/6/2015 10:54:43 AM

lguthrie
lguthrie
Posts: 41
Subject:
I am posting this via Lguthrie's site since I have once again been kick of the site and can not post anything.

Did you know that it was a Japanese American who broke the color barrier in National Basketball the same year that Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier in National Baseball. It was in 1947 that Wataru "Wat" Misaka was picked up by the New York Nicks for the 1947-1948 season. He was a 5'7" point guard. Amazing, that he was picked up in 1947 only 2 years after WWII and the incarceration of Japanese and Japanese Americans. You can find a DVD on "Wat" at the Japanese American National Museum gift store.
Jchomori
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1/15/2015 5:18:40 PM

rgochez
rgochez
Posts: 30
Subject: Boxing's Far East invasion
It seems like Macau is quickly becoming the Las Vegas of China and not just for the casinos but for championship boxing matches! This is in large part to olympic gold medalist Zou Shiming and to Manny Pacquiao who has had a couple of fights there now. Boxing would love to open up the market in China, but then again that's every industry.

http://espn.go.com/boxing/story/_/id/11931224/pacquiao-algieri-proof-china-growing-boxing-market
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1/15/2015 9:28:11 PM

zrichardson
zrichardson
Posts: 66
Subject: Sports -- generating interest in Asia
I agree with the concept of integrating martial arts as a viable alternative to aimlessly running around the PE track, and allow the student the opportunity to sample a variety of martial arts to see the one they will chose. Beyond the physical fitness and self discipline benefits. The social skills involved with sportsmanship and self defense rules are a valuable social capital for our students. They engage in age appropriate social interactions with their peers free of misguided animosity. Martial arts in any form allow for release of negative energy and infuses the brain with naturally produce endorphins.

--
Zrichardson
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1/20/2015 7:17:56 PM

kventuroso
kventuroso
Posts: 70
Subject:
I teach fifth grade, I think it would be awesome to include, but I am not sure I could teach it. Are there volunteer teachers or organizations that work in schools?
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1/20/2015 7:26:25 PM

kventuroso
kventuroso
Posts: 70
Subject:
My students are big fans of basketball and I think this is an awesome idea especially because the stories we presently read about Asian Americans, do not pique the interest of boys. We encourage students to connect with the readings and using biographies to compare the stories of Asian athletes on local teams. [font=merriweatherregular, Baskerville, Garamond, Cambria, Georgia, serif]But the point guard has many believers and will likely pick up more Asian-American fans when he comes to the Lakers, predicted Joz Wang, editor-in-chief of[/font][font=merriweatherregular, Baskerville, Garamond, Cambria, Georgia, serif] [/font]8Asians.com[font=merriweatherregular, Baskerville, Garamond, Cambria, Georgia, serif]. L.A. County, alone, has nearly 1.5 million residents of Asian descent. [/font]“There’s a huge fan base here,” said Wang, who is Taiwanese-American. “Literally people like me — not huge fans of the NBA, or even huge fans of basketball but fans of Jeremy Lin.”
Lakers General Manager Mitch Kupchak in a statement Sunday called Lin "a solid player who will make us a better team" who would receive a lot of support.
“In addition to what he’ll bring us on the court, we think Jeremy will be warmly embraced by our fans and our community," Kupchak said. http://www.scpr.org/blogs/multiamerican/2014/07/13/17000/linsanity-los-angeles-asian-americans-lakers/
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1/22/2015 12:28:26 AM

zrichardson
zrichardson
Posts: 66
Subject: Award-winning journalists Dan Washburn and Karl Taro Greenfeld discuss Washburn's new book, The Forbidden Game: Golf and the Chinese Dream
23. I attended this event at USC and I expected an author writing about a foreign country-China without having had the local experience of co-existing with the people, Washburn had written the book about. Instead I was surprised to discover the depth of his research and profound knowledge, the command and respect for the Chinese peoples’ customs. I appreciated the easy to read writing style, fill with honesty, awe of the regions he was able to visit while in China, his candor when I ask him, “what, qualify you to write this book? Or are you another armchair anthropologist with an imperialist perspective?” Washburn related that he had extensive knowledge about the geographic areas he wrote about in his book. He mentioned that, during his travels he befriended everyday people that were friendly and were willing to openly share the routines of their daily lives. The author mention he was constantly moving in the golf circuit and had plenty of opportunities to travel and experience a wide range of regional customs, such as eating and drinking with the locals. I felt satisfy that the author had done his research and I recommend his book about-The Forbidden Game: Golf and the Chinese Dream- it is entertaining worth reading.

--
Zrichardson
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1/28/2015 8:49:57 PM

rgochez
rgochez
Posts: 30
Subject: The Importance of Nisei Baseball in Japanese Internment Camps
I thought this would be a good way for history teachers to get their students even more interested in Japanese internments camps by teaching them about the role that baseball played during that awful time period for Nisei. This is one indicator of just how American these young men really were. The irony, they spent their time playing the American pass time while being interned inside of the United States.

http://www.sportscollectorsdigest.com/featured/the-importance-of-nisei-baseball-in-japanese-internment-camps
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